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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
Yeah the sharpfinger - I think that is it (I have CRSS). I had one years ago and lost it carring game out the woods and really missed it after that. I'm not sure if they still make it or not. I spied one laying in the bottom of an old display case at an old backwoods country store a few months ago so quickly grabbed it up. It still had the 1980s price tag of 20$ on it. I was a happy camper.

It is again my favorite skinning knife - if I can get my lazy backside out the house and go hunting I may get to use it. Its supposed to be bellow 40 here for the next week so this evening and tomorrow will be my window of opportunity.

If you are in a warmer region, check around your area to see if a business or similar near you has a meet locker you can store your kill in for a week or so - it helps to age it a bit before freezing it. 40 degs is all thats needed. You can also use an old fridge to store quartered game in to age it - check for used ones that can be picked up for near nothing. It still better to hang it upside down if possible though so the fluids drain better.
I once worked with a young man who’s father was a meat cutter for Kroger’s, who ran a side business cutting up deer during the season…had a helluva set up, nice house in town on a hill, big deck in back over the bottom story, meat hooks under the deck all around, freezers/coolers all over the bottom story/garages, deer hung all over even when all the freezers/coolers were filled.

(BTW, where I found out while you WILL get back the exact poundage you should get after weighing it in and figuring the percentage of meat you SHOULD get back…all the similar meat parts get thrown into big containers and while you WILL get back the right amount of steaks, backstraps, roasts, ground, etc., some of it MAY be from your 125 pound tender doe but some may be from that old buck that rode around in the back of a pickup in the sunshine for a week or so for bragging rights until it was “processed…”😉)

But one year we had unseasonably warm (80 degrees😳) weather forecast for the next week and I got my buck Sunday night and had to go out of town and wouldn’t be back to deal with it until Friday night…

The meat cutters advice…leave the skin ON to keep the flies off. Wash out the cavity well, then tie a large bag of ice inside the cavity tightly with string or rope and let it hang, shaded, should last a week. When you skin it and cut it up he said you MAY see a thin layer of meat that is discolored on the outside, cut that off and discard or feed it to your dogs.

It works!😉. Lost very little discolored meat, more than half of the ice was still ice after 5 days of 80 degree weather, most of the meat was nicely cooled and it tasted as good as any😉
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
They still make them but they're made in China now and made out of stainless steel. They're nowhere near the quality of the old U.S. made carbon steel knives and the current price of 18.95 reflects that.
It’s amazing how many guality US knife makers make most of their low
price knives in China😡

I look closely, I’m a Buck guy, but it better say made in USA or made in Idaho or I won’t even look at it.

While many Buck, Gerber, Kershaw, etc are made in USA you’d still better look at the package…if made in USA it will be in large print, but you have to look for the tiny print that says “China.”🤨
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
They still make them but they're made in China now and made out of stainless steel. They're nowhere near the quality of the old U.S. made carbon steel knives and the current price of 18.95 reflects that.
And another thing…serrated blades🤨

Does ANYBODY remember any US knife makers making serrated blades BEFORE the “cheap” Japanese or Chinese “bread knives” came on the scene in the 60s or 70s?

I’ve always believed there is NO advantage of a serrated blade over a good blade PROPERLY SHARPENED.

YES a serrated blade will always “cut better” than a dull blade…and YES an average person does NOT know how to or is too LAZY to sharpen or to LEARN how to sharpen a good conventional blade…

…my theory is serrated blades are the Chinese way of saying…”Look! We can make cheap knives sharp!”😡
 

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Ginsu knives anyone? Cut up aluminum cans??

Who knows where the idea first came from - sharks teeth, flint knives? Doing a google search you find some examples going way back in history but surfacing here in the late 1800s at a World's Fair and again around 1919. But you are probably right about the Japanese and then Chinese invasion.

I've only bought two, three maybe. The first was a Gerber Gator partially serrated. I didn't know any better but I actually liked it for cutting through a deer's brisket. Only recently have I learned how to sharpen them. A cheap Remington partially serrated folder with a long blade became my orange peeler at lunch times and stayed in the car for years till I gave it away. And once I bought an old Robinson carver with beautiful rosewood scales which had mini serrations just because I had a few of their other knives. They were a well known US knife mfg back in the old days. I have a 12" butcher knife (gave it to my daughter for melons and hard squash) and a 10" chef knife I use daily both of carbon steel which with daily steeling can stay sharp for a very long time. So far I haven't found a use for the one with mini serrations which must have been made in the years when stainless steel became popular close to when they went out of business.

If you ever visit the Spyderco forum you will find many who really appreciated serrations and even buy blades that are fully serrated. Those who think they may have to cut seat belts really appreciate them so you see many First Responders carrying them. I've never done the test myself but iirr they do outperform plain edges for that task. Really though, if I were ever to have to cut something that a serrated blade did well at, I think my own knives that are kept scary sharp will do the job. I just barely touched the palm of my hand yesterday fooling with one of my folders and they are not forgiving at all. Today I was wishing I had some of that antibiotic cream with the pain additive to take the sting out of it. One of those cuts where the knife hardly touches you but a sharp one plays "gotcha" every time.
 

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I really like the Sharpfinger. Not surprised so many others on this thread like it as well. It has plenty of backbone, and holds a good edge. I also carry an old case folding knife in case (unintentional pun) I lose the belt knife.

A lot of Newfoundland moose/caribou guides take their animals apart with an Opinel folder. The knife costs about 15 bucks (another unintentional pun), and take an incredible edge.

I'm of the opinion that many of us use knives that are probably bigger than they need to be. As for butchering, a bone saw, boning knife and butchers knife. I also like a filet knife for removing silver skin.
 

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For me it is an opined #5 pocket knife and a rapala bird sheath knife. That’s all I need until I get it home to cut it up. Then I use a Henkel boning knife and old hickory butcher knife for cutting steaks and roasts. I use a rapala filet knife for removing silver skin. Yes you are a knife looney but no more so than a lot of us. There is something pleasing about a good looking sharp knife. The opined pocket knife has been a revelation for me as I have had an intense dislike for everything French sine I served in Europe. My granddaughter gave it to me last Christmas and it has become my EDC. I have only sharpened it 3 times since getting it and I use it for cutting everything from string to wire. Great little knife. Pains me to say it but I highly recommend it.
 

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Just my belt knife when deer hunting. 3 7/8 inch drop point fixed blade. Do keep a Buck 110 in the truck, and have my small folder in my pocket all the time.
 
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