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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The extent of my use of Boiled Linseed Oil in the past has been in minor cleaning and treating surplus rifle stocks. Typically I use a 50/50 BLO/Mineral Spirits mix, and apply with a piece of of 000 steel wool and a wipe down just to remove goo and give a little sheen.

I recently bought an M1 Carbine that needed the handguard replaced. I found one from Boyd’s for $15, but it was new and unfinished. I want to match it (as much as possible)to the color of my gun which was cleaned using the above method. It still has the deep red finish, but without the greasy/gummy sticky feel to it.

What is the best method to get the new handguard to match the old beat up stock color?
 
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Garandaholic
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Quickly? There are dyes that people dissolve into the linseed to make that old finish color appear more quickly.
Really? Nothing. That red is OLD linseed oil. That's what it looks like after decades and like so many natural patinas, it's hard to duplicate.
You may never get there starting with boiled linseed oil. Million threads on this topic, but raw linseed oil, rubbed in HARD, many times over, then wait....that's where it came from.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
After three hand rubbed coats It has about the same darkness to the wood, but it has a brown matte finish. If I could get it to get a little shine to it, the match would be more acceptable.
 
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After three hand rubbed coats It has about the same darkness to the wood, but it has a brown matte finish. If I could get it to get a little shine to it, the match would be more acceptable.
A rubbed oil finish should really be more of a matte finish.
The brown will oxidize into that nice red...in time :)
 

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How close do you want it? IMO, it needs "aging".

Mix in a little (VERY LITTLE) (oil base) dark stain with some dirt. I don't know where to find the dirt, but maybe your wife can give you some suggestions.

Alternate rubbing the dirty finish in with some occasional "distressing" such as is done in furniture factories.

Make up a "distressing tool" by bending some big nails into a length of chain, and give it a couple hard whacks and rub some more finish before giving it another couple of hard whacks.

When you think it looks about right, build a small wood fire (or coal even better) in a barrel and let the smoke bathe it until the fire goes out.

Then take it out, rub it some more with the dirty oil finish, and hopefully it will look closer to the lower.

Good luck!
 

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Garandaholic
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Color match so far. I think it might need another coat or two and call it done. It looks a little different outside than it does inside.
View attachment 217540
Looks good.
The great thing about a Garand or carbine is miss-matched is much closer to their natural state than a spiffy new looking one is.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Well, I can’t ever be satisfied. I didn’t like the fit on the rifle. It looked like a new door on an old car, and sharp edges hung over the stock, so I sanded the hand guard to fit the stock, and then took it to the driveway and dropped it a few times in the gravels, whacked it once or twice on the horse trailer, and scraped it a few times with my fingernails. It sounds like I did a lot, but it only made a few small marks that I think will help it blend with the stock when I’m finished. I then put another “first coat” of BLO on the hand guard.
 

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Garandaholic
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Well, I can’t ever be satisfied. I didn’t like the fit on the rifle. It looked like a new door on an old car, and sharp edges hung over the stock, so I sanded the hand guard to fit the stock, and then took it to the driveway and dropped it a few times in the gravels, whacked it once or twice on the horse trailer, and scraped it a few times with my fingernails. It sounds like I did a lot, but it only made a few small marks that I think will kelp it blend with the stock when I’m finished. I then put another “first coat” of BLO on the hand guard.
LOL, nice. I wish I suggested this earlier...
If you go here
http://forums.thecmp.org/
I guarantee you can find a worn handguard that someone took off.
No place better for Garand/carbine info.
 

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What Designer said. Only looks like your way was more fun. You could use a soldering gun or iron to color it in a few places. I haven't tried that yet but plan to some day. I use paste shoe polish to get the color sometimes. Brown and Cordova or Oxblood depending on the brand.
 

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That looks great.
 

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you and Barney should go into Rifle stock restore business, Betty and Wilma can do the books.
When the Flinstones first came out Barney was a furniture reprocessor.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
you and Barney should go into Rifle stock restore business, Betty and Wilma can do the books.
When the Flinstones first came out Barney was a furniture reprocessor.
We would, but Bam Bam keeps breaking them.
 
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