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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just picked up the new rifle ( 300 win mag ) and was running reloads thru. I noticed 3 rounds that would not let the bolt lock down. I noticed on the shells upon further inspection that when I crimped the bullet I did to much and the shoulder was pushed in. Just a very little bit. And that made the dia. Of the shell a bit bigger. My question is would that be the problem or is it something else. I did not notice it on the shells that cycled good. That's why I'm asking. Ill post a pic if need be.
 

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same thing can happen if you try to apply a roll crimp, more than a hair, on a projectile that has no cannelure. you can put in a hair for some added tension.. but anymore and it bulges the case neck just past the mouth and will make them hard / impossible to chamber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
So I take it that is the problem. Ill have to pick up the lee crimp then. I roll crimped it just a tad too much and the shoulder bulges out. Thanks fellas. What's so special about the lee. How does it do it.
 

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So I take it that is the problem. Ill have to pick up the lee crimp then. I roll crimped it just a tad too much and the shoulder bulges out. Thanks fellas. What's so special about the lee. How does it do it.
rifle fcd squeezes the neck tot he projectile. vs roll crimping.

if you have no cannelure.. anything more than a hair and i do mean a hair of roll crimp will bulge them.

resize your bulged cases and re-use them..
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My bullets have cannulures but a few shells were smaller than max trim so the cannulures didn't match up. Kinda like having no cannulure. Thanks
 

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The problem is your brass is not the same length.

If you set your crimp using a long shell, on shorter shells you get not enough, or even NO crimp.

If you set your crimp using a short shell, if you have a long one you bulge the shoulder.

You have three solutions.

1 - do not crimp your shells. This is fine for a medium-recoiling bolt action with a box magazine. Tube magazine, because of the spring pushing against the bullet nose, needs to be crimped. Semi-autos, because of the violence involved in their loading, need to be crimped. Heavy recoiling gun, especially large caliber one, need to be crimped, so that the recoil does not make the bullet walk deeper into the case, increasing pressures and possibly causing a disaster.

2 - make sure ALL your shells are the exact same length. They don't have to all be minimum length. They don't have to all be maximum length. But they DO have to be THE SAME length.

3 - get a Lee Factory Crimp Die.
 

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you forgot

4 trim all cases to a set length.. set your crimp there.

if you have a handfull of shells that are short. run them by hand at the end of your run.. longest first. incrementally adjusting die and manually pulling nad looking each time.

obviously this works best on a single stage press.
 

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Don't crimp. Try a few without a crimp. I don't crimp bolt or single shot ammo...
i used to not crimp till dropping a box of shells but end down while on the way to do ladder testing.

i had 3 out of 20 with projectiles move. 1 dropped completely into the case onto the powder charge... 2 others set back enough tht i feared a pressure issue.. from then on.. everything gets some sort of crimp... even if a mild one for non cannelured projectiles. currently i'm (slowly) collecting lee fcd's for all my rifle caliber i shoot ...
 

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I hate LEE stuff EXCEPT for the LEE RIFLE Factory Crimp Die (FCD). The differences between it and a regular roll crimp are:

Roll crimps are where the end of the case mouth run into a edge inside the seating or separate roll crimp die. The press pushes the roll crimp on through the brass vertically (through the shoulder). If you get too much crimp or if all the trim lengths don't match you can collapse the shoulder enough so that the finished cartridge may not fit into the chamber.

The LEE RIFLE FCR uses a collet to crimp horizontally. The collet touches the shell holder and the force to close the collet is not the cartridge case but the press itself through the shell holder and ram.

The cases do NOT have to be all trimmed to the same length and you don't even need a cannalure to crimp into. The neck is pushed in horizontally in several places around the case neck. But over do it and you can collapse (dent) the bullet wall so follow the instructions.

NOTE: The Pistol version LEE FCD does not use a collet at all but is nothing more than a regular crimper, either roll or taper, with a sizing ring on the base of the die that makes sure an over crimp is sized back to within specs. I dislike that LEE calls it a FCD when it is really nothing more than a glorified regular crimp die and doesn't even work the same as the RIFLE version FCD. It confuses users.

LDBennett
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I think with all the answers ill try them all. But a lee crimp die sounds like a very good investment. Ill try them all but the crimp die sounds like a excellent solution. Are they caliber specific or can I use the .300 win mag on a .308, 7mm etc.? Thanks everyone, I thought that was the problem but I'm still new and getting different perspectives really helps. I went back and looked and saw rough marks and scratches on the shoulder so that kinda told me that was the hang up.
 

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I had a similar problem with a savage bolt gun in .223

about 2 out of 10 of my reloads would not let the bolt lock all of the way down
I think my problem was that the Lee Pro 1000 I was using was not fully resizing every case.
The Pro 1000 has a cam lock style tool head and mine has a small amount of play in it even when you fully stroke it.

When I started using my Dillon to load for the same gun, I have have not had a single round that the bolt would not close on since then
I do not factory crimp my 223 rounds
 

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They are caliber specific.
 

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Crimping is over rated. The only cases that need crimped are straight walled cases and heavy recoiling cannons which the 300 mag is neither of. My opinion is save your money for something of importance.
 

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They are cartridge specific. You can't even use the same one for all your 0.308" diameter bullets. You have to get a different one for your .30-30, your .308, your .300 Win Mag, etc.

Just clarfying, Alpo.
Yeah. Brain fade. That's what I meant. :eek:
 

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Semi-auto gun ammo should be crimped too as well a hunting loads. Any ammo that gets rough handling whether in the gun or in your pocket needs a crimp. My target gun ammo is usually not crimped. But ammo that rides in a magazine, removable or not, for a heavy recoiler like 300 mag should be crimped too. Any ammo that rides end to end in a tubular magazine, like in a lever gun, needs a crimp.

LDBennett
 
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