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I think I will get another book for my library today. I currently have Speer #14 and Lee 2nd. I was thinking of not getting the Hornady one in case I get a press from them and get the book for free. But lately I have come to the conclusion I will get a Dillon instead so the Hornady book is back on the list.

what other book are out there for a reloader of handgun, rifle, and/or shotshell?
 

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Hornady is a good one to own. You don't need to own a press from them, or buy their products to use it. I have a Nosler, a Hornady, and a AA book. The AA book only lists loads with their powders, but AA powders are my choice for hand gun loads. I don't buy Nosler bullets, and I don't know if they make a press or not, don't think they do. I use a Lee turret press, and the Nosler, and Hornady manuals work just fine, because the loads they list include many different bullet, powder, primer, and brass makers.
 

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I think every reloader should have Lyman's book. The latest versions of Speer and Hornady list only the bullets they make. Lyman lists most all of the popular bullets. If you get the Hornady manual I would get the 7th edition. That was the last Hornady edition to list bullets they don't make.
 

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I agree, another good choice.
 

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I bought a new LNL and it didn't come with a book. Was it supposed to?
 

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I like to suggest the Hornady reloading manual because it shows you how the cartridge works and how the reloading processes get the cartridge back to specs. It has good illustration to show that and more. It is a good learning book for reloading.

I use mostly spherical powders with my Dillion as they meter best through the Dillon powder measure. So I use the Hodgdon powders and reloading manual the most. I have other manuals like the Speer, Sierra, Lyman, and others and I do comparisons of loads with the Hodgdon manual. I have many editions of each but try to use only the latest edition as they may vary from year to year as the manufacturers update the load data for safety and because of better pressure test equipment they have acquired in the interim.

If you do get a Dillon you too may want to use spherical powders from Hodgdon and Winchester. You can also use the short-cut extruded powders from Hodgdon. There are Hodgdon/Winchester powders all across the burn rate chart to cover any possible cartridge. They are one of the most readily available powders.

LDBennett
 

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I use my hornaday book the most, I also have 49th lyman, and the speer 3. My next book will be the nosler. I shoot lots of their bullets I may as well get their guide.
 

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get em all.

lyman 49th is a great one.

sierra.. etc. get a book from every powder and projectile maker there is, that you use.
 

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IMO, only, put the Lee book on the shelf and get a Lyman 49th. While I like the "how to" section of the Lee book, I find the load data lacking. No starting load velocities. No primer info. No OAL per bullet data. Limited bullet/load data (160 gr. bullet in 30-30? Only 2 powders/same manufacturer, listed for 147 gr. bullets in 30-06 [very popular bullet size]. Only Hodgon powders listed for .44 Magnum 250 gr lead bullets [very popular bullet size], and many more). Not a Lee hater, but the data section in the Lee manual , for me, is a last resort...

If you're gonna shoot Hornady bullets, get a Hornady manual. And the same for Sierra, Nosler, Speer. etc.
 

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Get the Lyman and the Hornady then go with any you can find from the powder manufactures.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
so I need to look into Hornady and Sierra after I get the Lyman 49th tonight.
 

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I pretty much follow LD's sentiments on which manuals are must-have for beginning reloaders. Hornady and Lyman are the first two I recommend as they both do a good job describing the nuts and bolts of what's happening during both the reloading process but also during the cartridge firing cycle.
Any other manuals for brands of components you might be using would be my next choice but those two are the first ones I recommend.

Also...if you are planning on shooting Barnes bullets, be sure to get a copy of their manual instead of using "generic" data for regular jacketed style bullets. The numbers are very different as is how the pressure, velocity, and bullets react to a given load.
I don't want to scare you away from using Barnes, just offering the warning to use only their data with their bullets. (This applies to any of the other non-toxic "solid material" style bullets on the market these days too)
 

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IMO, only, put the Lee book on the shelf and get a Lyman 49th. While I like the "how to" section of the Lee book, I find the load data lacking. No starting load velocities. No primer info. No OAL per bullet data. Limited bullet/load data (160 gr. bullet in 30-30? Only 2 powders/same manufacturer, listed for 147 gr. bullets in 30-06 [very popular bullet size]. Only Hodgon powders listed for .44 Magnum 250 gr lead bullets [very popular bullet size], and many more). Not a Lee hater, but the data section in the Lee manual , for me, is a last resort...

If you're gonna shoot Hornady bullets, get a Hornady manual. And the same for Sierra, Nosler, Speer. etc.

Ditto ! Just saved me alot of typing ;):D
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

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If you're gonna shoot Hornady bullets, get a Hornady manual. And the same for Sierra, Nosler, Speer. etc.

Good advice right there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I kind of like the lyman book. It shows the twist rate along with the part numbers for projectiles they used. that's the kind of detail I am into.
 

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You need more than one manual, eventually. I must have a dozen. Some are repeats, of course, of various editions. I have just about everyone's manual.

LDBennett
 
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