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I've used them in my 16's for about 10 years in a non-nitro proofed drilling and a non-nitro proofed combination gun. If you're using black powder, a "square" load for whichever gauge you're shooting with the traditional wad column should give you at least decent results right out of the gate.

If you're wanting to use smokeless, I am of no help whatsoever.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I size them then prime, put my clay dot in, then I put a over shot card in then a plastic wad in,then shot, then a over shot card and glue the card in, Elmer's glue, done.
 

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I've still got some of Dad's old red hard plastic Alcan hulls. I've never reloaded them but a wad card is how you finish them up. I used to make shot shells for my M2 carbine for killing rats on guard duty. I'd drop a bit of wax over the lower powder charge and then another wad of wax over the shot charge. I suppose I could have made some hard carboard wads if I'd tried hard enough to come up with something. No manual for that stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
I've still got some of Dad's old red hard plastic Alcan hulls. I've never reloaded them but a wad card is how you finish them up. I used to make shot shells for my M2 carbine for killing rats on guard duty. I'd drop a bit of wax over the lower powder charge and then another wad of wax over the shot charge. I suppose I could have made some hard carboard wads if I'd tried hard enough to come up with something. No manual for that stuff.
For my old Iver Johnson 44-40 shotgun I take the 44-40 shell put the power in then the plastic shot tube for a 44 with shot in and crimp, works great, the 44-40 is the predasesser to the 410 shotgun. I can't buy ammo for it, so I have to make it.
 

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Evidently I misunderstood the question. Sized, primed, 70 grs. of Schuetzen Ffg, over powder card, fiber wad, 1 oz. of shot, OSC then covered with waterglass. I tried every glue but epoxy and super glue and none would hold up to recoil in drillings or combination guns. Waterglass does and, it also happens to be historically correct.
 

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How do you prevent your waterglass from setting up in the jar?

I bought a quart jar at the drugstore. Only size they had. I poured an ounce or so into a Dixie bathroom cup and put the lid back on. I worked out of that Dixie cup until what was in there solidified. Then I threw the cup away and poured another ounce or so out of the jar into a fresh cup.

Third or fourth time I went back to that jar to get a new ounce or so into a cup, the top couple of inches in the jar was solid.
 

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I've still got some of Dad's old red hard plastic Alcan hulls. I've never reloaded them but a wad card is how you finish them up. I used to make shot shells for my M2 carbine for killing rats on guard duty. I'd drop a bit of wax over the lower powder charge and then another wad of wax over the shot charge. I suppose I could have made some hard carboard wads if I'd tried hard enough to come up with something. No manual for that stuff.
Lol.. i have a few thousand old Alcan fiber and cork wads and a couple thousand Alcan nitro and overshot cards.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I still have the 157 primers for the old shot shells, I am using them by putting a plastic straw over the primer and installing in the newer shot shells, that take the 209's, I think I have abound 850 left.
 

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Alpo, it solidified that fast? From your post do I understand this happened in....an hour or so?
I don't know why unless it was open or had a loose cap. I can only assume air got to it over a period of time....I guess. The plastic bottle of about 12 ounces, I think, that I bought 3-4 years ago is still liquid. I was told to shake it up every few days because it will separate and solidify. Then invert the container, then next time you shake it, turn it the other way....which I haven't done for a couple weeks so I better go do it. I know it's still liquid because it sets on my loading bench so I don't forget to shake it up and flip the bottle....most of the time.
 

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soonerfan66 here is some early 1900s paper shotshells. Note the primers.
That's pretty cool ! I have thought about picking up a paper shotgun shell to put on the shelf but keep getting sidetracked . I remember reading that the major drawback of the paper shotgun shells was if they drew moister they tended to swell some then were hard to load .
 

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Depends on how they were stored. They were slightly wax coated but if left in high-ish heat the wax deteriorated. I have 4 or 5 boxes from my late father-in-law that are approaching 60 years old and they're like new. I have a bit over 1/2 a box of Winchester, 16 bore, 2 1/2 in. paper hulled shells from the 30's and while the box is about gone, the shells are fine. Dad and I sure loaded a lot of them when I was a kid and they always worked fine. They only went out because plastic is....cheap....and paper was cheaper than brass.

Oh, I went downstairs and my waterglass is fine. I shook it up good and turned over the bottle.
 
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Were I was reading about them swelling some and being hard to load or eject was in France during WW1 in the trenches . Field conditions guess is the wording was looking for . I saw some paper cartridges from 1860s that looked like were good enough to go shoot then and there . Not quite the same thing but your right how stuff is stored makes all the difference .
 
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