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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a real nice Brit 303 shoots real good but my brass is scored and bulged I took a pic but its kidda hard to see what you all think it is and can I fix it
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
All of the brass what's a good way to check the chamber
 

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Not real familar with the 303 if bolt action remove bolt and try to look into the firing chamber. If you have any plastic tools or any items to probe into the chamber with out scratching the chamber to feel for imperfections. Im not a pro mind you and real new to reloading. Just giving out ideas I would do. Good luck.
 

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I'm guessing that this is happening when firing the round. My suspicion would be that the bolt is not closing on the cartridge tight and when it fires the cartridge is slamming back a small distance onto the face of the bolt. Open the bolt, insert a cartridge fully into the barrel, lay a piece of paper on the back of the cartridge and close the bolt. Open the bolt and see if you can notice any indentation on the paper. If you don't see any, take a lead pencil and using the side of the lead gently color the paper and see if you get an outline of the base of the cartridge (like making a gravestone rubbing).

If with the cartridge fully seated you get no impression at all on the paper, add a second piece and try again. The bolt should be up against the cartridge when it fires. You should see clearly that this is so on a piece of paper between the bolt and the cartridge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Got to get some more ammo in the morning
When trying the paper thing with the fired brass it fits real tight it presses a few of the stamps from the back of the brass in to the paper
 

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Hmm.. The only other options I can think of are the brass itself or the actual bullets - a batch that is substandard maybe. Am I correct that this has only just started happening and previously everything was normal? When you get the next box of ammo, get a different brand if possible and let us know what happens. Cartridge casings should not be getting a bulge like that from firing.
 

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Is your .303 a No.1 MkIII or MkIII* with a WW1 date on the receiver? Also, do the bolt and receiver numbers match? Reason I'd asked about No.1s and the date of manufacture is because chamber dimensions found on many Lee Enfields of the period were oversize to (a) deal with mud and dirt of the trenches and still be able to function, and (b) be able to fire cartridges that left munitions factories grossly out of spec. If you have access to Cerrosafe chamber casting metal, you can make a chamber cast and compare the dimension to factory specs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
2 different boxes of ammo all did the same the brass don't like to seat fully do to the bulge so it might be pressing in to it when i chamber it when I get some more ammo in the morning I will try it
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
It's a number 1 mark III* numbers match and 1942 date
 

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2 different boxes of ammo all did the same the brass don't like to seat fully do to the bulge so it might be pressing in to it when i chamber it when I get some more ammo in the morning I will try it
I used to have a .303 years ago, there was never any bulge on the cartridge casings when I bought ammo. It the ammo you're getting already has a bulge, it shouldn't.
 

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This post is completely different than what I originally posted. Looking at that case, and seeing that it has not been run thru a sizer die, I think you have a case of a strecthed action and excessive headspace. I'd take the rifle in and have it headspaced before you use it again, if I were you.

It is normal for .303s to show a ring near the case head, about 1/4" from the case rim. A slight ring on an unsized case is common, and normally I'd advise just useing a neck sizer die set and not full-length sizeing so you can get 2 or 3 reloadings from your cases.

In your case I suspect that the issue is not the ordinary oversize Enfield chamber. Might be, but I'd have that one looked at and head spaced.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Think I figured it out I there was some odd silver gunk in the chamber I'm cleaning it out ATM will let ya all know if it fixes it
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The chamber is scored real bad once cleaned it out I thing some one tryed to recoat it or some thing looks like a new barrel is the only way to fix it might just make it a 308 any one know how to remove the barrel on this
 

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If you are talking about re-chambering to .308 Winchester, that won't work because the bore on a .303 is much larger. If you are talking re-barreling, you could get another barrel from Numrich Gun Parts, but it will likely cost at least $150 to have someone do the job. I don't think you are a gunsmith, and saying that you likely wouldn't have the tools necessary to do the job yourself.

Couple unique things about your rifle. The .303 is a pretty fat case, and it has a peculiar bore diameter, so that pretty much rules out re-chambering. There is a way of correcting for excessive headspace by changing out the bolt head - they made different size bolt heads for that reason.

Guess you'll have to shell out money to fix that rifle either way. Just got to figure out if it's worth doing it. Good luck - Jim
 

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The .303 BR Enfield No. 4 MK1 rifles (and No. 5 variants) have replacement Bolt Heads to adjust for headspace. The Bolt Heads are numbered 0 thru 3 and differ in size by 0.003 inch for each size. Be absolutely sure your is correct for your chamber.
 

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The chamber is scored real bad once cleaned it out I thing some one tryed to recoat it or some thing looks like a new barrel is the only way to fix it might just make it a 308 any one know how to remove the barrel on this
take it to a gunsmith,, 303 barrels are normally very hard to remove,, takes special tools,, your old barrel depending on how bad the old chamber is can be shortened a bit and have a the chamber recut, have done this with several old 303 that were damaged,, just have a competent gunsmith look at it and do the work. if u dont have the proper tools or know how, can destroy the gun if it is salvagable or damage yourself and those around you if not done properly !!! replacement original or new barrels are available,, try "www.gunpartscorp.com"
 

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The case bulge is normal and depends on the diameter of the chamber and the diameter of the case. The majority of American made .303 British cases run on the small side on diameter and will show a bulge when fired.

Both .303 cartridges below were fired in the same Enfield rifle, the Prvi case is a larger diameter and has thicker case walls than the HXP case.



What worries me is the fact that you are leaving a mark on a piece of paper you put behind the case, military surplus ammunition sometimes has rims as thick as .063 and minimum headspace is .064. American made cases normally have a rim thickness of approximately .058 and this makes me think someone changed the bolt head and your headspace is set under minimum headspace.

I have set Enfield rifle headspace under minimum and as long as your shooting American made cases with thin rims you are OK. BUT some milsurp ammo may not chamber so keep that in mind.

Below a No.4 Mk.2 fitted with two bolt heads that I use as my main Enfield shooter.



Below from a 1946 Australian book on the Lithgow No.1 Mk.III Enfield rifle.





You can not convert the No.1 Mk.III action to .308 even with a new barrel, the action was not designed for modern high pressure cartridges.

I would leave the rifle alone if it has not been modified and is still 100% military configuration, and just shoot it the way it is.

You will be money ahead to buy a Savage Axis or Stevens 200 and have a rifle made from modern steel that hasn't been tampered with or is half way worn out before you get it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
After looking around I just put it back to together just won't reload for it gun shoots to good to mess up I get 1 in groups at 100 yards with it I think it just did not get taken care of before I got it took me for ever to get that gray crap out of the chamber it's not bulging as bad any more but still scored up a bit only payed 125 for it so its a cheap little gun just costs an arm and a leg to shoot thanks for all the help oo and the mark on the paper was from the bulged brass did not like to re chamber it dose not do it will unfied brass
 

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What make, brand ammo is giving you the bulged cases? If you plan to reload I would use Prvi Partizan brass as it is made to military specs.

Someone may have had a case head separation and used a sharp object to remove the case and gouged your chamber.
 
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