The Firearms Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Although I am not a collector of antique guns, I always wanted to buy a Brown Bess of the American revolution.
I need advice on a purchase I might make in the near future.

There is a 2nd model British Brown Bess for sale for $4500 it is in good condition, and works, but the lock has been replaced, the seller says it's a period replacement.
The replacement lock is dated 1779 by Wilson.
What do you think I should do, walk away, keep lookin ?
Thanks.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,111 Posts
The price is at the low end from what I've seen lately, but that's not a bad thing. As far as shooting it, well, I have an original Bess and I wouldn't fire it with modern powder, there is a huge difference in power and you could damage a fine old musket.
I'd also look closely at the lock, they absolutely replaced unservicable locks, but there are Wilson reproduction locks out there, look for acceptance marks that look the right "age". You have to do your research and I hope this turns out to be something you will enjoy
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The price is at the low end from what I've seen lately, but that's not a bad thing. As far as shooting it, well, I have an original Bess and I wouldn't fire it with modern powder, there is a huge difference in power and you could damage a fine old musket.
I'd also look closely at the lock, they absolutely replaced unservicable locks, but there are Wilson reproduction locks out there, look for acceptance marks that look the right "age". You have to do your research and I hope this turns out to be something you will enjoy
Thanks, I'll keep that in mind,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,378 Posts
I wouldn't be shooting an original musket from that era - period. The metal was questionable for safety when they were made, and 300 years in age doesn't make them any safer. If it decides to blow apart - you have just ruined an irreplaceable piece of history. I am sure mankind will forever be in your debt for doing so (if you aren't maimed or killed in the process).

If you want to shoot a Brown Bess, why NOT buy a modern made, quality replica? It would be far less costly, Far stronger than a 300 year old relic. It will shoot and operate exactly the same as an original. You do realize that the military smooth bore muskets were completely inaccurate (that was the reason for "Volley Fire" - so that the odds of somebody on the receiving end of that fire could actually be hit by someone's shot)?

If you do manage to find and purchase an original musket, please bear in mind that they are not making any original 300 year old muskets these days.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I wouldn't be shooting an original musket from that era - period. The metal was questionable for safety when they were made, and 300 years in age doesn't make them any safer. If it decides to blow apart - you have just ruined an irreplaceable piece of history. I am sure mankind will forever be in your debt for doing so (if you aren't maimed or killed in the process).

If you want to shoot a Brown Bess, why NOT buy a modern made, quality replica? It would be far less costly, Far stronger than a 300 year old relic. It will shoot and operate exactly the same as an original. You do realize that the military smooth bore muskets were completely inaccurate (that was the reason for "Volley Fire" - so that the odds of somebody on the receiving end of that fire could actually be hit by someone's shot)?

If you do manage to find and purchase an original musket, please bear in mind that they are not making any original 300 year old muskets these days.
Thanks for the advice.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top