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I'm new to this group and wanted to learn more about this Browning my grandfather left me. based on the serial number (3714), it looks like it was made in 1952. the shotgun is in pretty good shape. Looking for any advice on establishing the value of this model and possibly the best way to sell this. I'll be moving to Costa Rica next year and won't be able to take any of my weapons with me.




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ASuperposed is a fine shotgun.Pictures are still downloading so we’ll have to wait to give a value. I can say that we can certainly help you find a home for your guns.
 

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I can’t give you a price but that is a beautiful specimen. It sucks that you would ever have to part with it. Is there nobody else in your family that would be interested in taking it? At least that way, Grandpa’s shotgun could stay with his family.
 

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Nice looking Superposed. I'm not sure of it's value, but I'm pretty sure the sub gauges bring more than 12 gauge guns cause there are fewer of them. Loved to have it myself, but no way i can afford it. I have a feeling it's going to be worth between $1500 to 2000.00 dollars. But hopefully some of our experts will be able to give you a more accurate value on it.
 

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I'm only asking about the shotgun. Not sure why you would be concerned about me moving to CR.
Take it easy. He was just making a joke. While you landed here for specific info there are a bunch of us regulars, you know, the ones you want help from, that are friends and we have fun. Guess you’re the more serious type.
 

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I have a feeling it's going to be worth between $1500 to 2000.00 dollars
I think you are a little high on this. Can't tell the grade from these pictures or condition.
 
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I think you are a little high on this. Can't tell the grade from these pictures or condition.
You could be right. It's been a few years since i looked at the value of these. If i remember it seemed like the 12 gauges were going around 1k and up depending on the grade. And the sub gauges were always a little more.
 

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It's been a while since I looked into the value of used Superposed but there was always one question that came up. I think it may have pertained to the older ones. Something about finish or how oil affected the wood. I can't remember but it seemed to lower the value a little. I could only guess also.
 

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It's been a while since I looked into the value of used Superposed but there was always one question that came up. I think it may have pertained to the older ones. Something about finish or how oil affected the wood. I can't remember but it seemed to lower the value a little. I could only guess also.
I think you are referring to the Salt Wood problem that occurred in the mid 60's to a few in the early 70s. Browning tried to dry their wood blanks by using salt. It worked to some extent but the lower stacked blanks ended up with a Brine solution which when then stocks were assembled to the receivers the metal would start to rust after a while. From the OPs pics he does not appear to have this problem.
 

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I think you are referring to the Salt Wood problem that occurred in the mid 60's to a few in the early 70s. Browning tried to dry their wood blanks by using salt. It worked to some extent but the lower stacked blanks ended up with a Brine solution which when then stocks were assembled to the receivers the metal would start to rust after a while. From the OPs pics he does not appear to have this problem.
Excellent explanation. I always wondered what they were talking about and now it makes sense. I think Dad's Skeet/Skeet was bought in the mid to late 60s and also does not show any evidence of that.
 

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I'm only asking about the shotgun. Not sure why you would be concerned about me moving to CR.
Sir, with all due respect, you're the one who mentioned it. What, pray tell, does your upcoming move have to do with the value of the shotgun?
 

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A Belgian Superposed in 20ga, even a Field Grade in that condition will bring $2300 - $2600.
Davecz, open the gun, on the left side of the chamber area will be Choke markings, asterisks and slashes. Can you post a good clear closeup of those? Another of the top lever with the action closed?
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I can’t give you a price but that is a beautiful specimen. It sucks that you would ever have to part with it. Is there nobody else in your family that would be interested in taking it? At least that way, Grandpa’s shotgun could stay with his family.
Thanks Willie. I hate not being able to take it with me. I don't have any family left who could hold on to it. I do have a close friend who I trust. he cold hold onto it for me. I'm hoping to get an idea on the value as I sort this out. thanks again.
 

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Those are the pics I asked for. Joe asked about salt wood stocks, those were on guns made from 1966-1972. 67-69 were the worst.
Top barrel is choked Modified, the bottom barrel is choked Improved Cylinder, a little harder to find, and a great Quail gun. Most common are Modified bottom, and Full top. Top lever on a Superposed when new, is offset to the right. With wear, they move to the left, and a good indicator for the amount of use. At dead center, it's time to start thinking about a rebuild. Left of center is worn out.
The safety is also the barrel selector, moving it left to right selects which barrel fires first. Generally, you want to fire the bottom barrel first, because it has less recoil, and allows for a faster follow up shot. Choke in the bottom barrel is more open for closer shots, and the top tighter to reach out to get the one you missed the first time. It has selective ejectors, meaning you only fire one barrel, it will eject that shell, and only extract the other.
With the Costa Rica permit approval, you can take the gun with you. Hunting is illegal there, but shooting sports are popular.
 
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