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Hi guys, Im new to reloading, in fact I havent even set up my machine yet. I got my Hornady digital scale yesterday and decided to calibrate it, used the supplied 100gr weight and it was off a bit. I then put a 95gr Remington bullet on and several bullets read 95.4, 95.6, 95.9, 96.0 etc. Is this typical or is my scale off or what. I only paid 30 bucks for this scale but it got good reviews so I figured it would be ok.
 
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1. They are remington bullets. They are known to be the low end of bullets. I have seen them have a spread like this. I myself would never shoot Remington bullet. Not a big deal a bullet is a bullet. Just don't load them to max loads and you will be OK. I would buy a box of Sierra or Hornady bullets in the same weight and check the scale with them. I have never had either with bullets outside of .1 grain of their specified weight.

2. The scale might also be slightly off. Make sure there are no cell phones, cordless phones, electric motors, flo lights, extension cords, or power lines around the scale. Also make sure it is in an area with NO air movement.
 

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Most of my reloading is for range use with bulk fmj or lswc bullets and I find that variance in weight between individual bullets to be the norm. I did purchase, a long time back, a set of "weight checks" to keep an eye on my scale. I don't remember what I paid for them back then but a check today shows them being a little on the pricey side for what you get. If you have a machinist friend maybe he could make you some using his shop equipment.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/493216/rcbs-standard-scale-check-weights-605-grains
 

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Hi guys, Im new to reloading, in fact I havent even set up my machine yet. I got my Hornady digital scale yesterday and decided to calibrate it, used the supplied 100gr weight and it was off a bit. I then put a 95gr Remington bullet on and several bullets read 95.4, 95.6, 95.9, 96.0 etc. Is this typical or is my scale off or what. I only paid 30 bucks for this scale but it got good reviews so I figured it would be ok.
If the weight continued to increase as you described it is an issue, if you meant that there was a general variation that range is OK. One thing I may add is to turn the scale on 30 minutes before calibrating. If you dont, there is some variation that occurs.
 

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Most of my reloading is for range use with bulk fmj or lswc bullets and I find that variance in weight between individual bullets to be the norm. I did purchase, a long time back, a set of "weight checks" to keep an eye on my scale. I don't remember what I paid for them back then but a check today shows them being a little on the pricey side for what you get. If you have a machinist friend maybe he could make you some using his shop equipment.

http://www.midwayusa.com/product/493216/rcbs-standard-scale-check-weights-605-grains
Apparently, it came with a check weight.

Hi guys, Im new to reloading, in fact I havent even set up my machine yet. I got my Hornady digital scale yesterday and decided to calibrate it, used the supplied 100gr weight and it was off a bit. I then put a 95gr Remington bullet on and several bullets read 95.4, 95.6, 95.9, 96.0 etc. Is this typical or is my scale off or what. I only paid 30 bucks for this scale but it got good reviews so I figured it would be ok.

You will se a variation in every bullet. I don't care who makes them.
 

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They are remington bullets. They are known to be the low end of bullets. I have seen them have a spread like this. I myself would never shoot Remington bullet.




I wish I could count on both hands of how many hogs and deer that I've killed using Rem. Core-Lokt bullets.
 

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Read the calibration instructions very carefully and follow them completely to calibrate the scale and you should be OK on that. As already stated, you are not going to find any two bullets to be exactly the same weight and that doesn't really matter if they are off a grain or two. The closest I have personally found were Berger .224 bullets, those didn't vary 1/10 of a grain for about 20 that I weighed.
 

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I have that same scale and they are very accurate. You cannot turn it on to warm it up because it shuts down automatically. When I calibrate my scale I will test it with several premeasured cartridges and it is always dead on after two years of use. As far as the bullet weight beinbg off that is normal and ok.
 

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How do you like the Berger in 224? What gr?Tom T
I like them just fine, 62 grain is all I have tried!

My SOTA upper with what is supposed to be a 1/9 twist will tumble a 68/69 grain bullet so I was wanting to try some 62 grain bullets to see how they worked. The only 62 grain bullet that my LGS had were Berger so I bought a box of them. They worked absolutely fine and were very accurate with 24.0 grains of CFE-223 powder.

I do not know why the 68/69 grainers tumble in the SOTA upper. They shot just fine in the Bushmaster with 1/9 twist. I have not given up on the 68/69, I will play around with different powders and weights of powders to find something that works. I would like to stay with the CFE-223, but will use something different if they keep tumbling with CFE.

BTW, I don't have a problem with 55 grain bullets either and I have thousands of them.
 
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