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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Attached are some photo's of the shot gun, all I know about it is that my father got it from his grandfather, and never properly took care of it. I'm wondering if its anything of value and if I should have it professionally restored or what. Thanks for any help (i hope the images work).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It sure is. I'm not sure where my great grandfather got it from. In the first photo there are some markings. They are hard to make out, and I've been cleaning it but I think thats as clear as they'll ever be.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Any idea if it has any value? And could one restore the mechanical parts? or what should I do with it? Also would it be Westley Richards & Co Ltd. or is there anyway to tell the gunmaker? so I could look up the serial
 

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If it were made by Westley Richards or another major British maker it would be so-marked.

It was probably made by members of the "Birmingham Trade" guild, and is a utility grade gun.

I don't see any visible parts missing but the forend iron has stuck to the barrel and pulled the screws out of the forend wood. You might try soaking awhile with penetrating oil around the point where the barrel lug is protruding through the forend iron, and then see if it will pry loose.

It's value is only as an heirloom and decorator, $100 or less.
 

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Present condition & value $50-100. Professionally restored, spend $500-1000 or more. Restored value $150-200 but looking nice. If the heirloom factor outweighs the $ cost, it could be worth it.
 

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Once you get the forend iron unstuck from the barrel, you can reattach it to the wood by partially filling the screw holes with toothpick-like slivers of hardwood along with a good slathering of wood glue--this will give the screws something to bite on. Two or three per hole should do it. Then reattach while the glue is still wet (be careful not to overtighten the screws, just snug them up a bit).Then let it dry for a day or two before reattaching. You can get a new tenon (or whatever they call it) from Dixiegunworks. I wouldn't do anymore to it than that
 

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This relic has virtually no interest to firearms enthusiasts, but it may be of some interest to an interior decorator. One of them may pay you $75 or so for use as a wall decoration.
 

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I have to agree with everybody else, its too far gone to restore unless it has some serious sentimental value to you.
 

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I have an ancient W&C Scott damascus 30" side-lever hammer gun that pretty much matches your's in design, stock shape, checkering pattern and so forth. The maker's markings are on the upper rib, and the serial number on the tail end of the trigger guard tang. The shotgun's in a hard case buried under a ton of stuff in the bedroom closet or I would've posted a picture for comparison. Paid about $125 for the Scott in an Kellogg, Idaho antique shop about five years ago.
 

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I had an old side by side years back that had W. Richards marked on it. Turned out to be a cheap Belgian knock-off of a Wesley Richards. Many of these were sold back around the turn of the last century. They were cheap gun even back then. They were sold through various hardware and department stores. Even restored, these guns have little to no value as collector pieces. Oil it and clean it, makes a neat wall hanger.

those who beat their guns into plowshares, will plow for those who didn't
 
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