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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently inherited a beautiful old gun from my father in law. It is a double barrel side by side. It has "D. Egg pall mall london" engraved between the barrels and has a gold sheild on the bottom of the stock. If anyone coukd give me more info on this gun as far as how old it is and a possible value that'd be great.
 

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Pall Mall, other than being the name of an American brand of cigarette, was one of the gun shop districts in London along with Bond St. and James St. Durs Egg is an old English maker of best guns ranking with Purdey, Boss, W.J. Jeffrey and Harris & Henry Holland among others. Without seeing proof marks the best I can do is guess a date of from the 1870's to maybe the 1890's. There should be proof marks on the water table and on the barrel flats. To find them remove the forearm and remove the barrels from the action. Good, legible pictures of all proofs will tell much. By the late 1890's the Anson & Deeley box lock along with the Purdey double underbites had pretty well written the end of the old side lever, Jones underlever, Roux and Lefaucheux actions.

Any firearm with the name Egg is desirable. How desirable I'm sorry I can't say but I believe as far as old double guns are concerned an original, authentic Egg would have fairly significant value. Whether that significance is $1,500 or $15,000 I don't know. What I do know is you have inherited a fine old piece from a very respected maker and one to be proud of. Congratulations sir.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Pall Mall, other than being the name of an American brand of cigarette, was one of the gun shop districts in London along with Bond St. and James St. Durs Egg is an old English maker of best guns ranking with Purdey, Boss, W.J. Jeffrey and Harris & Henry Holland among others. Without seeing proof marks the best I can do is guess a date of from the 1870's to maybe the 1890's. There should be proof marks on the water table and on the barrel flats. To find them remove the forearm and remove the barrels from the action. Good, legible pictures of all proofs will tell much. By the late 1890's the Anson & Deeley box lock along with the Purdey double underbites had pretty well written the end of the old side lever, Jones underlever, Roux and Lefaucheux actions.

Any firearm with the name Egg is desirable. How desirable I'm sorry I can't say but I believe as far as old double guns are concerned an original, authentic Egg would have fairly significant value. Whether that significance is $1,500 or $15,000 I don't know. What I do know is you have inherited a fine old piece from a very respected maker and one to be proud of. Congratulations sir.
Does this help?
 

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It might help others more familiar with British proofs than me. Best I can tell you from those proofs is it's pre-1904 but we pretty much knew that. I do believe they're Birmingham proofs but am subject to correction. The 13 is the actual bore size but don't worry about that, it is a 12 bore and probably has 2 1/2 inch chambers.
 
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His son took over the business and ran it under the Durs Egg name as did one of his grandsons, the shop on Pall Mall was in business as 'Durs Egg' up into the 1870's.
 
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
His son took over the business and ran it under the Durs Egg name as did one of his grandsons, the shop on Pall Mall was in business as 'Durs Egg' up into the 1870's.
OK. So how does that suggest the gun wasn't made by Durs?
 

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Because Durs went blind in 1822 and died in 1831, he'd of been dead for nearly forty years before this shotgun was made, had Durs made it, it would be a flintlock.
 

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Because center fire cartridges had yet to be invented when Durs was still alive and still capable of making guns.

Just because my truck says Ford on the grill does not mean Henry Ford made it, it just means it was made by a company he founded that still bears his name.

The company, 'Durs Egg, Pall Mall' was still trading under the business name 'Durs Egg, Pall Mall' until the mid 1870's.

So yes, your gun was made by Durs Egg, the business establishment, not by Durs Egg the famous gunsmith.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
How do you know the date of when the gun was made?
I just found this. This is the exact gun I have. Made in 1830.
Because center fire cartridges had yet to be invented when Durs was still alive and still capable of making guns.

Just because my truck says Ford on the grill does not mean Henry Ford made it, it just means it was made by a company he founded that still bears his name.

The company, 'Durs Egg, Pall Mall' was still trading under the business name 'Durs Egg, Pall Mall' until the mid 1870's.

So yes, your gun was made by Durs Egg, the business establishment, not by Durs Egg the famous gunsmith.
So do you know around what year it was made? I'd really like to find that out?
 

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If the gun in the thumbnail is the one you mean as "The exact gun I have", no it isn't. The one you linked to is a muzzleloader, yours is a cartridge firing gun. Pinfire cartridges were developed in the 1830's by Lefaucheux in France but yours is definitely not a pinfire. Yours shoots centerfire shotshells nearly identical to those of today. Griz is 100% correct.

I don't know when the Durs Egg concern closed its doors but if it was in the 1870's as Griz mentions in a previous post yours had to be made around that time. I don't believe any earlier. Without a personal examination by someone completely familiar with the British firearms industry of that era and probably Durs Egg in particular an exact date probably can't be known unless there is other proof marks. The side lever was fairly new in the 1870's so that decade might be as close as you're going to get.

Henry Holland, founder of what became Holland and Holland, John Rigby, Wesley Richards, Purdey, John Rigby, Johann Outschar, the Merkel brothers, Oliver Winchester, Eliphalet Remington, Roy Weatherby and Bill Ruger have been dead for years, most for over 100 years, and you can still purchase firearms made by their company. Difference being most, if not all, of those companies are no longer owned by their progeny. In the mid to late 1800 nearly all the European and British concerns were still owned by their offspring or the spouses of their offspring.
 

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Hey Sharps4590, I have a Garrett Sharps carbine chambered in 45-70. It is in excellent condition and has been shot very little, maybe one box of 45 70 ammo. Are you familiar with that particular piece ? I've been thinking about having it re-chambered to 45 90 caliber. If you have an opinion of such a conversion I'd like to hear your thoughts. Thanks Big Coulee
 

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Big, this should probably have gone in a different thread so I'll PM you.
 
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