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I was recently handed down my grandfathers black powder pistol. I was very close to him and firearms were a hobby we shared and now i have this really cool piece of him to hold onto. The thing is, it is in rough shape. It was tortured for years by 7 year old me and all my little cousins playing cowboys and cops and robbers. So i would love to get this repaired if it is at all possible. Also i have absolutely no idea what make, model or caliber it is. I have uploaded some photos of the markings and things i found on the pistol. I am curious about the ships engraved on the cylinder and the markings on the lip of the cylinder "ENGAGED 16 May 1843." It just seems unique and it has always had my curiosity. I can't find the name of the manufacturer anywhere, just some markings on the bottom of the grip. So I'm reaching out for some help finding someone that can possibly fix this and tell me about what it is. If you need more information just let me know and I'll get it to you.
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It's an Italian made copy of a pistol that never really existed. It's supposed to be a Confederate made clone of the 1851 .36 Colt Navy, thus the brass frame instead of the iron frames Colt 1851's actually had, the Confederate made clones didn't have the Colt's Naval battle scene roll engraved on the cylinder and many had round barrels rather than the octagon barrels Colt used. Yours also appears to have the larger .44 caliber rebated cylinder used on the 1860 .44 army. None of the 1851Colts, Colt made or Confederate made, were ever made in .44 caliber and the 1860 army models didn't have the Naval battle scene.
There are parts available for the .36 Navy Colts repros but Pietta and Uberti are the only companies still making Colt cap n ball revolvers and not all parts are a direct fit for the older copies made by other companies, some hand fitting of the parts will most likely be needed. Pretty much any qualified gunsmith in your area can do the repairs and fitting of any replacement parts. Or you can contact @goofy, he does darned good restoration work.

Edit- I see Trapp beat me to the punch while I was typing.
 

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Looking at the guns and proof marks it is an Italian copy of a Colt 1851 Naval Revolver in either .44 or .36 caliber made in 1978 (The AD code in the rectangle is the year.) imported by FIE (stands for Firearms Import Export).

The PR (I think) might indicate either "PATRO di Palama Roberto - Verdello 1976" or "Pierino Ruschetta" - or might not. ;)

The date inscribed on the cylinder probably refers to the Naval Battle of Campeche - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Battle_of_Campeche

Hope that helps,

-Ron
 

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Looking at the guns and proof marks it is an Italian copy of a Colt 1851 Naval Revolver in either .44 or .36 caliber made in 1978 (The AD code in the rectangle is the year.) imported by FIE (stands for Firearms Import Export).

The PR (I think) might indicate either "PATRO di Palama Roberto - Verdello 1976" or "Pierino Ruschetta" - or might not. ;)

The date inscribed on the cylinder probably refers to the Naval Battle of Campeche - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Naval_Battle_of_Campeche

Hope that helps,

-Ron
Scrap, it's a .44 caliber, .36 caliber pistols don't have rebated cylinders.
 

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I was recently handed down my grandfathers black powder pistol. I was very close to him and firearms were a hobby we shared and now i have this really cool piece of him to hold onto. The thing is, it is in rough shape. It was tortured for years by 7 year old me and all my little cousins playing cowboys and cops and robbers. So i would love to get this repaired if it is at all possible. Also i have absolutely no idea what make, model or caliber it is. I have uploaded some photos of the markings and things i found on the pistol. I am curious about the ships engraved on the cylinder and the markings on the lip of the cylinder "ENGAGED 16 May 1843." It just seems unique and it has always had my curiosity. I can't find the name of the manufacturer anywhere, just some markings on the bottom of the grip. So I'm reaching out for some help finding someone that can possibly fix this and tell me about what it is. If you need more information just let me know and I'll get it to you. View attachment 222846 View attachment 222848 View attachment 222850 View attachment 222852 View attachment 222854 View attachment 222856 View attachment 222858 View attachment 222860
First thanks for the referrals.
Yes this gun can be restored. From what I can tell from the pictures most of the pitting can be removed but not all of it.(Or you will lose some engraving).
If you are interested in having it done PM me as we do not talk on the open forum about work/prices and so on.
Mike
 

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This revolver looks great considering it survived the grandchildren! Your grandfather sounds like he was a really COOL grandfather! If it were mine, I'd have the 'damage' repaired to make it once again functional - but still leave most of the 'battle scars'.

I have my grandfather's ("Pop") 67A Winchester single shot .22. The stock has some dings and scratches, and the bluing is a tad thin - but I'll never refinish it. The scratches and dings are from his grandkids (and great-grandkids) learning how to shoot. Pop passed away in 1962 and many years later I took MY 10 year old grandson down to my range and let him shoot that old .22 for his first time. He didn't know I heard him after he took a long shot and hit the target - but I heard him softly say "Thanks, Pop!". No - that rifle will never be refinished.
 

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I know where you are coming from with this gun. The cost could exceed the value but that is a secondary consideration. It has a great story behind it.
I am not into the value of BP guns so I do not know and it has not been said what this gun is worth.
But I do know how much it would cost to restore so if someone who knows BP guns can put a value to this gun I can say if the cost is worth doing.
Although I do ALLOT of restore that cost more then the gun is worth but because of the "History" and the family pass down it becomes worth it.
What would you say this gun is worth?.
Mike
 

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You all are awesome. This was great to wake up to. I'm so glad I found this forum! But thank you so much for the information and the recommendations for repair. I will be in touch and we can figure out this repair. Thank you all again.
 

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Mike, Cabelas has a listing for a brand new 1851 .44 cal Confederate Navy revolver for $199.99.

Granted, it isn't Bojangles grand dad's pistol they are selling.

Some things like family history you just can't put a dollar amount on.
 

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I talked to @MrBojangles yesterday he is going to send me the gun this week.
The one thing that came up was he wants new nipples for it. I have no idea about BP stuff. Can someone tell me where to get them?. Size/ Threads and so on.
And when they are installed do you put anything on the threads? Like I have to do on my BP rifle.
All the parts it might need I already found but will not know what it needs intill it is in my hands.
It is good timing because I am just now finishing up steel on a batch so I can add it to this batch.
Mike
 

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Mike it is most likely to be a metric thread on the nipples, 6mm x .75. Most black powder supply houses will have them. be sure to specify revolver nipples, rifle/pistol nipples are taller. You may need a nipple wrench but you can make one out of an old 1/4 inch drive deep well socket by grinding or milling a slot in it to fit the flats on the nipple. Be prepared to have to use a drill and easy out, sometimes they are quite stubborn if the gun hasn't been disassembled and cleaned in a long time. A little drop of gun oil on the threads on installing them is all you need.
 
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