The Firearms Forum banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,532 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok folks. I have a 1865 Frank Wesson Type 2 Tip-up .44 Caliber Henry Flat that's been passed down to me from my Great, Great Grandfather. I have been on a quest to have this thing shooting again and possibly restored to a point.

I know, I know, don't restore a antique firearm like that..... Well, this will never leave my family, it'll be passed to my son one day. With that said the monitary value is of no concenquence to me. I'd really like it shooting again.

Currently i've been searching for a trigger guard for it. Here is a picture, notice the one on it is cracked and it looks like a home repair was made on it at one time but didn't hold up. If anyone knows anyone that could lead me to one it would be much appreciated.

Thanks for looking guys.
[URL=http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/515/p1010318h.jpg/]
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,425 Posts
That's a tough one. You might be best to take the picture of what it's supposed to look like and go to a metal shop (similar to the guy we have around here) and have him custom make you one. Take it off and make a trace of it is a good idea also. I'd bet our local metalsmith would do one for around $100 or less - depends on what metal you'd want to use.

Other than that, you can only really hope to keep hitting up the auction sites that list parts and keep looking...

Alternately, you could have it braised by a metalsmith since it looks to be brass. You could probably get a very professional repair done to it reasonably that would make it hardly noticeable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,532 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I thought about just having it remade Will. That's probably what's going to have to happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
213 Posts
A good tig welder could fix it right up or have it recast in steel or iron but you could cast it your self if your a DYI making one with aluminum is really easy I made every thing I use to cast stuff for 15 bucks and I make rail spacers and such really easy if you want to go down that road pm and will will tell ya how to make the mold and foundry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,182 Posts
determine the metal type, then remove and have a person skilled in that type of metal working repair it.

IE.. brazing for brass.. tig/mig/arc weld for steels.. etc.. etc.

silver solders for some other alloys..

alloy solder for zincs and aluminums.. etc.. pot metals.. etc..
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,425 Posts
I'm with soundguy on this firefighter which is why I suggested it. You'd be MUCH better off having a professional repair job done to it than making a new trigger guard. Two reasons for this are 1). It would keep the original look of the rifle and 2). It would preserve the value better since it would still be the original trigger guard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,608 Posts
It looks brass to me and someone soldered it or tried to.
If it is brass (cast) and that's guess on my part do to picture.
Brazing it is not a big deal for someone good with torch. A some filing and polishing and you will need a magnifying glass to detect the repair.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,302 Posts
I agree--repairing the originial is the way to go. An experienced gunsmith or welder should be able to identify the metal and fix it at not much cost, leaving enough metal to allow grindind down to origninal contour. There is nothing wrong with fixing up an old gun--but refinishing the stock and reblueing will diminish the value. Personally, I'd fix that crack in the stock, fix the triggerguard and maybe color in the repair with some cold blue--nothing wrong with letting it show its age.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25 Posts
I worked for many years as a welder/fabricator and currently I occasionally do welding for a couple of local gunsmiths. I think that it would be an easy repair. After it is welded and reshaped, a touch of muriatic acid to "age" the repair with a Qtip and it would be hard to see where it was welded.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
5,425 Posts
firefighter - I think you have a consensus - just have it fixed :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,099 Posts
Buffalochip's is the best. Poorest ideas are repair by someone not experienced in restoration/repair of old guns. Better left as-is than an obvious repair attempt.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top