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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got a old riverside double sxs and after a lot of research I found that it was missing the ejector on the forearm. So I installed the ejector on my forearm and now the forearm won't go back on the receiver. It just won't go back together. It's hitting in all kinds of places. I know it's right ejector, but I just can't get it back together....any ideas????
 

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are the hammers cocked?
 

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Just popped the forend off my 16 guage Model 315. The ejector is a very, very sloppy fit, easily moved at least 1/16" to either side of center position, and just about the same distance fore-aft from its cradled position in the forend iron. The part is original to this shotgun, and from appearance of the ejector screw's face has never been removed. Might this offer you a clue?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Mine is quite sloppy when screwed in as well. Is the ejector screw screwed in from the outside? Or do you have to unscrew the wood from the forend iron and screw the screw through the the inside of the forend iron before screwing the forend wood back on?
 

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Or do you have to unscrew the wood from the forend iron and screw the screw through the the inside of the forend iron before screwing the forend wood back on?
Exactly as you'd noted above. Wood comes off, screw goes in from the inside of the iron before the wood goes back on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well that's how mine is.....it seems when I try to snap the forearm in place, the forend's spring opening seems to hit the rear of the spring stop that's on the barrel....it's like it almost goes in smoot but then just stops right before it snaps in place
 

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Well that's how mine is.....it seems when I try to snap the forearm in place, the forend's spring opening seems to hit the rear of the spring stop that's on the barrel....it's like it almost goes in smoot but then just stops right before it snaps in place
Am sitting here with the 315 on the desk trying to see what would duplicate that situation. If the forend's spring opening is contacting the rear of the barrel stud/spring stop, that'd imply the ejector is holding the forend forward just far enough that the spring opening won't close over the barrel stud. If you can determine how far forward that is - and it won't be much, you might consider taking just a bit off the curved portion of the ejector that rides in the corresponding curved cutout of the forend iron. If you remove the wood it'll be easier to determine how much is needed, and in all probability it will be much less than you anticipated.
 

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p.s. to previous: I presume the forend snapped into place properly before the replacement ejector was installed?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I c, I was trying not to mess with that back curve of the ejector...if I must I must. Do u recommend a dremmel? Or is that overkill do u think? Best way to keep the curve?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
p.s. to previous: I presume the forend snapped into place properly before the replacement ejector was installed?
Well it was originally missing its ejector. So the forend snapped in place fine....a question, if you take the barrel off, and snap the forend in place, does Ur extractor stick out as if it's extracting a shell?
 

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I c, I was trying not to mess with that back curve of the ejector...if I must I must. Do u recommend a dremmel? Or is that overkill do u think? Best way to keep the curve?
If the glitch is on that back curve of the ejector, and if the forend snapped into place before that's probably where it is, then I'd suggest going at it very, very slowly with a fine file rather than a Dremel. For what it's worth, when filing curved surfaces of relatively small parts such as the ejector, I always favored locking the file in my bench vise, then using both hands to draw the piece across the file. This is just the opposite of putting the part in the vise and going at it with the file. but I always found it easier to maintain dead level filing - as opposed to accidentally canting off to one side - by holding the part in both hands and drawing it across the file. I suspect parts such as the ejector were largely hand fitted back in the day, so if you've a new/old replacement ejector I think that's what you're in for. Just my humble opinion, but while Dremels are great tools I think the potential of removing too much material is there, and once gone it's gone. Go slowly, remove and test fit, repeat as necessary etc. Sorry, but that's about all I can offer you.

Regarding barrel off and forend snapped on: no, extractors remain seated flush in barrel, though if I have to fiddle a bit to get it in place it will touch the extractor, but once the forend's snapped down I can push the extractor flush.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I c, I will try that way with the file. My ejector is pushed out when I snap the forend in place without the receiver and it won't go back in...I'm pretty sure this still is the back curve of the ejector doing this. I will try and post, hopefully successful, results. Thanks for all the help.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Hey thanks for all the help mac. I can't reply to Ur pm cuz I have only posted 7 times, so I m gona repost that in here with what I would have replied.
nmckenzie said:
Had a thought regarding the ejector pushing the forend too far forward, so removed the forend wood from my 16 guage to see if the ejector's screw might have a role in the problem. On my 315 it's evident the slotted screw head's in contact with the wood, not enough to cause any probems, but enough to leave a very faint impression in the wood. If the ejector screw of your 315 had a thicker (measuring front to back) head than the original, it might be contacting the wood and pushing the ejector backwards, which would push the forend forwards when trying to snap it into place. Just for the heck of it, see if there's a significant indentation in the forend wood caused by the ejector screw's slotted head. If so, the solution might be as simple as just a bit of inletting on the forend wood so the screw head doesn't hit. Just a thought.

Mac
I actually did fix it and it was that I needed to trim of an amount of material off the back of the ejector. What I actually endedup doing was takinge the forend off and take the ejector out. Then snap the barrel to the receiver and I dropped the ejector in place where it would go if u had the forend snapped in place. U could see the back of the ejector protruding out and above the receiver, it basically didn't sit flush and I realized it would have to in order to close and fire correctly. So I kept rounding the back and trying until it sat flush....I have never put a shell in it before, I had a box of 12 ga lying around and twon't fit, too big. So its not a 12ga. I also had some 20ga layin around so I threw one of those in the barrel...it's very loose and the shell extractor does extract it when I open it, it just kinda misses....so would that make it a 16ga?
 
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