Carrying in a salt water environment. Need suggestions

Discussion in 'Technical Questions & Information' started by hkruss, May 7, 2009.

  1. hkruss

    hkruss Active Member

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    Being five minutes from Mobile bay, I am thinking about buying a sit-on kayak to take advantage of the great fishing to be had here. I want to carry a pistol for "just in case", but I am concerned over the possible effects of saltwater on the gun. My friends who kayak tell me that I will get wet, despite my best efforts. I thought about keeping the pistol in a big ziplock bag, but in our very humid climate, I worry about condensation building up in the bag thereby possibly affecting the pistol. Plus, if I get actual saltwater down in the gun, I worry about it getting on metal parts that I can't access through normal cleaning and lubrication.
    Any suggestions?
     
  2. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    I hate to say it, because I despise the gun, but - Glock.
     

  3. PPK 32

    PPK 32 Active Member

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    Saw an article on the "World's first all poly revolver" was in guns and ammo. I think it was made by Ruger. Its specific purpose is for adverse conditions such as this, may want to check it out.
     
  4. bcj1755

    bcj1755 New Member

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    Or a Walther P99:p;)
     
  5. Alpo

    Alpo Well-Known Member

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    I don't know. I've heard bad things about the P99. Ain't never heard anything bad about Glock, I just don't like 'em.
     
  6. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Well it depends. Having been kyaking in the States last year I can tell you, its real wet. Gun wise a stainless is the obvious choice, but they can rust, as can the internals. The only real answer is to clean and dry the gun very thoroughly after the days over.

    As an aside, if very serious, when we preped weapons for wet and damp conditions we gold plated internal parts to resist corrosion. I know, but its true.
     
  7. olmossbak

    olmossbak New Member

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    Growing up in UA(as opposed to LA) the first thing I learned to do was sweat. Therefore, I carry in a salt water environment all the time. Have you considered Ezzox? I just learned about it and it seems to be a very good product.

    Prior to that I would take the gun down, spray it with WD40 then rinse it with Naphtha to remove the WD40 and let it dry. Try using an old time shaving brush to apply the oil and wipe off excess. With Ezzox this WD40 and rinse may not be necessary. I say may not as I haven't been using it long enough to verify.

    I also sold my Glock 23 but kept the H&K USPc

    To the poor ignorant yankees, LA is lower Alabama. Ain't no part of Alabama referred to as 'northern'.:D
     
  8. 00BUSA

    00BUSA New Member

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    This ignorant yankee was lost.
     
  9. hkruss

    hkruss Active Member

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    Thanks for the replies so far.

    The pistol I would be carrying is my baby Glock 27.

    This leads me to what may be one of the dumber questions you've ever seen. WHAT IF... after a day on the water, when I get home, I break the gun down and thoroughly wash it down with fresh water? Then dry off and lubricate the barrel, slide, recoil spring etc...
    Then, leaving those parts off, turn the pistol upside down to drain and use a blow dryer to finish drying out the innards of the gun, of course lubricating afterwards. Do you think the fresh water flush could harm anything as long as I made sure to dry it thoroughly afterwards? I was thinking that surely Glocks have been torture tested by submersion in water then firing. Kind of the same thing, only, I would be drying and lubricating after flushing.
    Thought of another question. You Sailors and Marines who fired weapons while aboard ships... did ya'll take any extra steps in cleaning to prevent saltwater damage? Just thinking that if you were in a tropical saltwater environment, there must have been some level of salt mixed in with the humid air.

    Just remembered something DeltaSoultaker told me about how he would actually take his M-4 into the shower, so if that didn't hurt it, then maybe......?

    Your thoughts?
     
  10. bcj1755

    bcj1755 New Member

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    You must have heard about the .40 version. I have the 9mm for about 2 1/2 years and have fired about 680-700 rounds throught it and have never had the first problem with it. It eats anything I feed it. Avoid the S&W version like the Plauge!!!! The 9mm is 100% German and is outstanding in its reliability, at least for me. As for Glocks, they do have their share of problems, like any mechanical device, but they are reliable also. They just do not fit my hands at all.
     
  11. Gene Seward

    Gene Seward Member

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    Glock is the way to go. My buddy has the Glock 21 in .45 and got it "years" ago. Maybe 5 years after purchase he got a letter from Glock telling him they had determined some of the inner workings may not work properly if exposed to saltwater and to send it in and they would update it. He did and none of it cost a dime except shipping to them. Now that is customer service!
     
  12. Bindernut

    Bindernut Well-Known Member

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    Very warm to hot soapy water to wash all the salty crud off, a clean hot water rinse, and then a good breakdown & wipe with oil and or gun grease. Use water as hot as you can stand to stick your hands in and then keep the gun in it long enough to heat it up. The heat will help evaporate the water off faster once it's out of it's bath. Same thing I do with my blackpowder revolvers after a day at the range...

    I don't live near saltwater, but my sweat is nearly as corrosive as salt-water spray if I don't clean and oil my blued handguns regularly. My Mak looks absolutely horrible on one side from concealed carry in the summer time...I'm a BIG fan of stainless! but as already mentioned, even stainless will corrode in salt water exposure.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2009
  13. Monkey Hollow

    Monkey Hollow Member

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    Do you have to have your sidearm in a holster on your person? Why not keep it in an Otter Box or similar watertight case like a Pelican Case? They are made for whitewater rafters and hold cameras, cellular phones, etc., and come in a variety of sizes. Could even stash a dessicant box like used in gun safes in one plus spare mags or a box of ammo.
     
  14. TranterUK

    TranterUK Guest

    Here's something I would consider, buy a second 'wet' gun. Second hand, inexpensive and treat it rough. Get it wet, dry it out and clean it, but keep your primary gun safe and away from water.
     
  15. Ursus

    Ursus Active Member

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