The Firearms Forum banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Is there a tool for holding the casing during prep? I have a Frankfort Arsenal case prep center and my hand starts to cramp after a short time, mostly with pistol casings. Is there a better way to do it or am I gonna just have to suck it up? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
I know that, too. ;) I deburr my cases, but only once, not every time I'm reloading. It helps seating the bullets (no more chrushed cases) and repeating a lever action is smoother.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,034 Posts
Apart from not doing unnecessary prep work on pistol brass you could try an anti-slip working/gardening glove.
With those you don't have to hold the case as tightly.
 

·
Deer Stalker
Joined
·
6,498 Posts
Regarding case prep on the Frankford, I typically use it for only rifle brass.

When I do big groups of brass such a LC that needs the primer ring removed, I'll break up the work load to no more than 200 a day using Mechnix Wear gloves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,224 Posts
I would love a case prep station - I have a Forster trimmer and hand tools. ;) I agree on the non slip thin garden glove, might be the way to go, or a padded jaws vise grip, set REALLY loose. I'd be nervous about crushing cases with that one.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
854 Posts
I also don't trim/deburr pistol brass, but the Lee drill chuck for the trim mandrels would be easier to hang onto.

View attachment 260239
+1 for the lee case holder tool.

You may find thier case length gauge and hand trimmer works fairly easy also but since you have the brass working equipment that should be easier for processing larger runs. Combining the lee hand held brass holding tool would give you more to hold on to. You still have to buy both the trimmer and mandrel and the length gage cartridge specific part to get the right shell holder part but they are like press shell holders and one holder will work with more than one ammo type as long as the rim is the same. The lee system has the gauge that mounts to the trimmer so trimming to length is easy and always the same if you dont force it out of square with a drill motor but that part will only work with the lee cutter. Deburring with the lee hand held is not so easy especially if you trim a lot off like when converting mag cases to spl cases.

I do trim brass used for heavy magnum loads regularly for consistant crimps but usually dont need to for std pressure rounds. Sometimes trimming mixed brass to all the same length one time is also a good practice if roll crimping but it wont help the differences in case volumn. With auto pistol rounds that headspace on the mouth as long as your slide goes into full battery I usually dont wory with trimming because they are only lightly tapper crimped.

It depends on what you want to do with your ammo also. The more you put into consistancy the better groups you get. If the gun and or sights limit your groups anyway you likely dont need super high precision ammo - it just needs to be safe and reliable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18,594 Posts
If you're not trimming there's no need to deburr. I can't remember ever trimming a pistol case. Not even my 44-40's.
Agreed.. Straight wall pistol I've never trimmed...only bottleneck brass. I don't chamfer or debur straight wall either since no trim..
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
If you're not trimming there's no need to deburr. I can't remember ever trimming a pistol case. Not even my 44-40's.
If the 44-40 is loaded to original smokeless powder ballistics, the cases will stretch over time. I keep my stretched 44-40 brass trimmed to 1.300"

However, I "trim" all my 44-40 brass after the first shot to make sure the case mouth is even. All crimps are not created equal and an oblong crimp can hinder accuracy.

if accuracy is not needed such as cowboy action shooting, then trimming is mute. One reason guys crush the case mouth of the 44-40 cases is because the cases are different lengths and they set the crimp die to a shorter case.

I can tell when my brass starts to get hard by the amount of pressure that is needed to bellow the case mouth with the Lyman "M" die.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top