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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So I got up the nerve to check out my 30-06 tonight.

Still not totally sure what exactly is wrong with it.

I did notice that if I set the rear action screw so that it doesn't interfere with the operation of the bolt the rear of the action is lose in the stock. If I tighten the rear action screw it protrudes so far that I can't operate the bolt.





 

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That looks like a M1917 Eddystone I have. It is damn close, since Remington, Eddystone ( a sister company of remington), and Winchester made the M1917 for the us military in 1917 and 1918, so it may be the same gun. I know the trigger on mine is very, very light and a good bump could be all it takes to set it off. On my 1917 it would take a pretty good hit to do so because the trigger pull will very light still has a good bit of travel before it goes bang. Not sure how the trigger on the Model 30 is. Having your finger on the trigger while closing the bolt doesn't seem likely because unless the m30 is different than the 1917, it cocks on closing the bolt. I don't think the firing pin would hit hard enough even if you closed the bolt a fast as you could. I love my 1917, it shoots OH SO GOOD. It could be the the screw caught sticking up caught the firing pin tang and held it back and then slammed forward past the sear and set it off. Actually taking another look at the picks, I feel pretty confident thats what caused it. Well that and not doing a proper safety check, but if there was a good time to find an issue like that, I would say it is a happy tragedy. Take that screw out and file it down so it doesn't stick up above the tang.
 

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I would guess that over time, the pillars that the action screws go through got crushed a bit over the years. I know mine are crushed, and they are not much more than a rolled piece of metal pressed into the stock.
 

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The screw protrudes from overtightening. Repeated overtightening of the action screws have compressed the wood. You can shorten the screw with a dremel tool and reblue it with a dab of cold blue.

The striker engagement needs to be addressed to cure the touchy trigger.
 

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Remington was one of the makers of the U.S. Rifle Model 17. After World War One was over they cleaned up the design and made the basic same rifle as their Model 30.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
The screw protrudes from overtightening. Repeated overtightening of the action screws have compressed the wood. You can shorten the screw with a dremel tool and reblue it with a dab of cold blue.

The striker engagement needs to be addressed to cure the touchy trigger.
Wish I could find a new laminate stock for it. Without the 6 month wait from Richards.
 

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Can you have aluminum pillars put in to take up the "crushed wood" effect?
 

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The Model 1917 had a pillar at the rear and so did the Model 30, which was a Model 1917, made by using surplus parts (Remington never made a receiver for those rifles - the Model 30, 30S and 725 were all made with surplus M1917 receivers.)

But sometimes folks discarded the pillars so they could tighten down the stock screws, and that may be what happened here. The trouble with just putting in a new pillar is that you have to bed or shim the action to take up the amount of wood compression.

Jim
 

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Check out Boyds stocks. The Remington model 30 uses the same basic stock as the 1917, but the floor plates are different. The 30 uses a straight floor plate for a 5 round box, the 1917 has a bent floor plate for a 6 round box. According to boyds, the 1917 stock only need minor fitting though.
 

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First of all, trim the screw. Doesnt matter if its a mauser, enfield, springfield, model 70, model 700, or any of 100 other bolt action rifles, its not uncommon to have to trim this screw, ESPECIALLY if you replace the stock, or modify the general alignment of the magazine like you have to to remove the hump of an enfield to make it as sleek as the Model 30 lines. Secondly, glass in the two action screws by enlarging the holes, coating the screws THOROUGHLY with release agent, and glassing the holes in the stock keeping in mind that you ESPECIALLY dont want to overtighten the screws because if the 'glass winds up looking in CROSS SECTION like a capital letter "I" that is the best scenario; the larger diameter with the top and bottom parts of the "I" act sort of like washers in a way, to limit or eliminate any further crushing of the wood in the tang and recoil area action screw passages. This is ESPECIALLY true of most older Savage 110's and the stevens/springfield copies of em. The stocks are made of birch, which is SIGNIFICANTLY softer than walnut or maple, and tend to almost ALWAYS crush to some extent. This is true of the "hardwood" stocks used on most Winchester Ranger's and on the Remington 788. You will also find that the tang area of many less expensive synthetic stocks, like Choate and RamLine are actually HOLLOW in this area, and consist of a little plastic "tab" at the top and bottom of the tang area action screw which will not only "crush" but can completely crack out of the stock's pistol grip body casting. Aluminum or steel pillar "tubes" are also a possibility, BUT......they need to be SECURED in place, not free floating from top to bottom as this WILL affect accuracy in differing weather (heat and humidity) conditions. I dont see anything in the beginning about an accidental discharge, but assume from some of the comments that this may have been mentioned in an earlier thread.............I must say, I am not an expert on the Enfield action having only owned one over the years, and no longer do, so I cant tear into it to check out the "guts" but.............that having been said, the action screw situation should not THEORETICALLY have an affect on the safety of the safety mechanism, sear/trigger engagement, etc. Sounds to me like a trip to the gunsmith is in order, unless you are comfortable with personally disassembling and checking the match up of these surfaces; the contact surfaces of the sear to trigger mechanism should be the entire crux of the issue unless there is something VERY different about the mechanics of an Enfield compared to most any cock on closing action. In any event, retiring the rifle for these issues is akin to retiring your pickup because it needs a starter and new tires; kinda premature.............??
 

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Might do well to back the rear screw out and see if the the problem is there or if some citizen has been monkeying with the trigger/sear. Back in the day there were some modifications sold that were downright dangerous. Seems like Remington later modified the bolt and trigger but the earlier Model 30's used GI parts. It may prove beneficial to look for the simplest answer to this problem first-a butchered up trigger assembly. S picture that would show how the trigger guard and receiver fit it the stock would be helpful.
 

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If you plan to restock the rifle, I suggest not trimming the screw until you do. Otherwise you might find it too short with the new stock.

Jim
 

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I resolved a similar issue by installing a washer under the rear screw hole of the trigger guard to keep the screw from over tightening and pulling the trigger guard into the now crushed stock resess. Shortening the screw was the other option, but the rear of the guard would still have pulled in below the wood line.
Would you post a picture of the trigger area of the stock with and without metal?
 
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