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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have been thinking of a way to color code the primers on my .45 Colt loads. Of course I box them separately and mark the boxes very well but things, mix ups can happen. I am using Oregon Trail Cast RNFP 250gn for my revolvers and Oregon Trail Cast RNFP 300gn for the rifle loads but they don't look that different.

What I am thinking of doing is to use colored marking pens to color the primer of loaded rounds as I make them. Say Red for the rifle loads and Green for the handgun loads. Does that make sense? I cannot see any problems with the use of the ink from marking pens, as it is extremely thin.

Am I missing something? Is this a reasonable working idea?
 

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I mark my black-powder loads with a black sharpie. Just paint the primer black. Works fine, easily seen, and when I deprime the marking goes away. Any marker I get on the brass gets removed when I tumble it.

I see no problem with what you suggest.
 

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red sharpie marker.. Put a dot on the primer of the hotter rounds as you pull them off the press.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks guys!

It made sense to me but I wanted to be sure I wasn't overlooking something that could be a problem.
 

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I load .45 Colt to two very different pressures, and I found that I cannot mix them up if I load the very hot rifle rounds in nickle plated brass, and lighter pistol rounds in regular brass. Marking the boxes as well, of course. Might be something for you to considder.
 

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I do that also. I load my "target" 38 loads in brass brass, and my "social" 38 loads in nickel brass. I load my "rifle" 357s in brass brass and my "pistol' 357s in nickel.

45 Colt, though - you don't see a whole lot of nickel. I've got, maybe, 100 rounds of nickel, while I have a couple of thousand rounds of brass. I could, I suppose, special order nickel brass in, but I don't believe it lasts as long as brass brass, so would hate to spend the money. All my nickel brass (except for 357) has been scrounged, or found in "1000 rounds of once-fired brass" buys.
 

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You'll only need to mark one, either rifle load or handgun load. Personally, I have my wife make some Avery labels w/blank space for load data and I attach them, with data to each box of loaded ammo. I have 5, .44 Magnums and usually have 4 or 5 different .44 Magnum loads on hand. I use my simple reloading safety methods when handling ammo; don't have more than one load/box open at the same time, use common sense, and I read each label before I open it at the range. Been doing this for nearly 20 years and no mix-ups.....
 

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I do the same thing. I have a pack of sharpies with around ten different colors. When doing load work-up I color the primers different colors for different loads and put them all in the same 100 round plastic box. I put a label on the box with what load each color represents.
 

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Dont bother marking them as you pull them off the press. Mark them while the primers are in the package. It would be much faster and easier to mark that way. If you use them in something else, it doesnt matter. Say mark all the rifle primers you think you might use and if you dont use all of them, oh well. Use them on the next batch or on a differant rifle load.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Even more good suggestions. Thanks guys!
 
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