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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello I recently aquired a colt 1911 and I am having a really hard time getting specifics on it. First of all I am not going to sell it, regardless of the value it will be a shooter, none of my guns are safe queens. Anyways thank you in advance for the help.

So here is the info on the gun, right side of the slide says "model of 1911" in all capital letters, left side of the slide has the patent dates and a colt logo then "colt's pt.f.a.mfg.co hartford, ct.usa.". right side of the frame has the serial number "NO197XX" a total of five digits, also what looks like a "26" on the trigger gaurd. On the left side of the frame says "united states property" in all caps, "AA" (augusta arsenel) is stamped right under that, and "ECC" is stamped between the grip and trigger. Under the grip saftey there is an "A" with "18" right below it. There is also a "N" right below the rear sight and above the hammer.
 

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I think its a 1912 or 1913 model. Pretty sure its an arsenal rebuild. Grips and possible main spring has been replaced. Someone smarter than me should come along soon...
 

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Helpful note. If you don't want folks to know the entire number (197xx), don't post a photo showing the SN on the gun. :p

If it was a Colt, it was made in 1913. Howsomever, Colt and Remington UMC numbers overlapped, and it is a Remington frame, made in 1919, with a Colt slide on it. EEC is Major Edmund E. Chapman, who did finals on Remington UMC 1911s.

Except for the hammer, which looks to be an A1, it appears, to me, to be all 1911, which is cool. The picture is kind of fuzzy, and I can't tell if it has an arched mainspring housing or not. If so, that is also A1, as the 1911's was flat.

The AA is where it was rebuilt. So either it was rebuilt using no (except, possibly, the hammer) A1 parts, but with all 1911 parts, or someone has taken the trouble to find 1911 parts to put it back in correct condition.

This is nice to have tucked away in your files.

 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Helpful note. If you don't want folks to know the entire number (197xx), don't post a photo showing the SN on the gun. :p

If it was a Colt, it was made in 1913. Howsomever, Colt and Remington UMC numbers overlapped, and it is a Remington frame, made in 1919, with a Colt slide on it. EEC is Major Edmund E. Chapman, who did finals on Remington UMC 1911s.

Except for the hammer, which looks to be an A1, it appears, to me, to be all 1911, which is cool. The picture is kind of fuzzy, and I can't tell if it has an arched mainspring housing or not. If so, that is also A1, as the 1911's was flat.

The AA is where it was rebuilt. So either it was rebuilt using no (except, possibly, the hammer) A1 parts, but with all 1911 parts, or someone has taken the trouble to find 1911 parts to put it back in correct condition.

This is nice to have tucked away in your files.
Thanks a ton for the info! I was on my mobile app so the picture was not the one I intended to post, but I guess it doesn't really matter since its all legal and registered and stuff. That is some really cool info, I wish it was a colt frame but it's still pretty cool. Either way its a cool old 1911.
 

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Thanks a ton for the info! I was on my mobile app so the picture was not the one I intended to post, but I guess it doesn't really matter since its all legal and registered and stuff. That is some really cool info, I wish it was a colt frame but it's still pretty cool. Either way its a cool old 1911.
Yes it is.

And you have my sympathy for living somewhere you have to register your guns.
 
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Alpo is our resident grammar expert so every now and then we take fun in giving him a jab. I'm sure he did it on purpose.
 

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If you look at that picture of 1911 marks I attached, I believe you'll find it's the one on the top left. Springfield inspection mark.

And "howsomever" is a perfectly normal southern word. Ain't my fault if Yankees or California folk don't know it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
If you look at that picture of 1911 marks I attached, I believe you'll find it's the one on the top left. Springfield inspection mark.

And "howsomever" is a perfectly normal southern word. Ain't my fault if Yankees or California folk don't know it.
Its remington and Springfield?sorry I come from a german gun background, I didnt know the different company marks could be on the same gun.
 

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When the arsenal did rebuilding they just tossed all the parts from guns in bins and refurbished the good parts and disposed of the bad ones, when the guns were re-assembled they didn't care if all the parts came from the same gun they were removed from.
 

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