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a good friend`s Grandad aquired this in Texas in the 1920`s.
i am trying to find out a few things about the revolver.

is the engraving done after it left the factory?
i dont`t know what to compare it to.

anyone recognize the logo on the grip?

and the value?

Thanks








More pictures here.
Code:
https://www.dropbox.com/sh/6310gg5mhuq293t/w5CXNtEF_X
 

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It looks to me like what we now would call a "barbeque gun", common in Texas and the Southwest. Those guns were intended less for use than to impress the neighbors at a social occasion. I think it safe to say that the engraving is not factory; it was probably done in Mexico. The gun was made in late 1890; approximately 31,000 Model 1889's were made through 1894.

I believe the engraving is contemporary with the gun. I say that because sometimes old guns that have no finish or are badly rusted, are given cheap engraving and sold at high prices, but I don't think that is the case here, partly because the common wear points like the cylinder latch and the ratchet look almost new, which would likely not be the case with a worked-over junker.

The mother of pearl grips are real; the initals on the grips were probably those of the original owner, or possibly a ranch brand, but I have no idea what they stand for.

The ejector rod head should be replaced, as its absence lessens the value of the gun. The cylinder latch is not mismatched; the number is an assembly number and will not match the serial number.

As to that value, I simply can't tell you. A plain Model 1889 can run well over $2500 in "like new" condition. The value could be less or greater than that, depending on whether there is any more information available, such as proof of ownership by some prominent person (or notorious villain).

Incidentally, for those looking for cylinder stop notches, those guns used the same system as the Double Action Army Model of 1878; the hand acted both to turn the cylinder and to lock it in place for firing.

Jim
 
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