Competition Grade .22

Discussion in 'Competition Shooting Forum' started by OBrien, May 7, 2009.

  1. OBrien

    OBrien New Member

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    I am looking to get a .22 pistol and would like to get one that will be able to shoot accurately every time. I am looking to find out what model would make the best choice and what extras would have to be done to it. This would be a pistol to practice with and maybe even start myself in competition with. Any advice is appreciated. Thanks.
     
  2. Tom Militano

    Tom Militano New Member

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    What kind of competition are you thinking about getting in to? For bulls eyes shooting I'd go with a S&W Model 41.
     

  3. pawn

    pawn Active Member

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    +1
    ______________________________________________________________

    If we are talking serious competitive shooting, the price tag goes up exponentially after S&W41, arguably the best American shooter in its class.
     
  4. TOOHSOTKIL

    TOOHSOTKIL Active Member

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    As above, big field without knowing what you are shooting for, not only that but price counts too.
    Old, Current, Customizing or all these.
     
  5. OBrien

    OBrien New Member

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    Yes bullseye would be the type of competition I would be looking for. I have looked at and shot the rugers but not the smiths. Price wise I am willing to spend a pretty penny I want something that I will not have any complaints.

    Thanks
     
  6. PPK 32

    PPK 32 Active Member

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    Another one to throw in is a High Standard if ya can find one. Never shot it but seen it in action. They are pricey and hard to find, but are real tack drivers too. I shoot Rugers, like em, shot a 41 too, liked it.
     
  7. Mr. 22

    Mr. 22 New Member

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    I'm a Newbie...

    I had to add this!

    [​IMG]

    It's a Browning Medalist that was used for the Olympics. The nicest looking .22 pistol ever made! With those rosewood grips it fits like glove. The accuracy goes without mentioning. I have a buddy who has one and he scoped (!) his..., it is truly a one-holer!

    The only downside is it's ~$1000-$1500 depending on condition and accessories for the 'standard' models. They also made a 'Goldline' and a 'Renaissance' that are totally outrageous - looks and price!
     
  8. Danwin22

    Danwin22 Active Member

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    That Browning Medalist is number one on my "Wanted" .22 pistol list. What a beauty.
     
  9. dksac2

    dksac2 New Member

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    Anyone tried the Russian comp 22 pistols that CDNN sells for about $300.
    The have the wrap around target grip and from what I understand are very good shooters.

    John K
     
  10. grcsat

    grcsat Well-Known Member

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    Hi, yes I have used the Russian comp 22 pistols , however which ones?
    I myself have used the Vostok and have won both a bronze and silver. But that was a long time ago.
    These guns don't need any tuning which can save you a lot of money.
    The only down fall of Russion pistols is that they are ALWAYS underated and always really UGLY.
    So if you don't mind ugly , the russian pistols are the way to go for an entry level pistol.
    I will say that I have never known anyone that was more acurate than the Vostok pistol they were useing.

    People who have used these pistols usually sell them because of two reasons.
    1) they may not be a perfict fit for the shooter.
    2) peer preasure from other shooters. ( cheap gun can't be any good---Go out and buy a real gun---ect )

    Gary
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2011
  11. 300 H&H

    300 H&H Active Member

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    I think I read recently that Biakal (EAA) is importing the IZH 35 pistol once again....Some think it is a very go entry level pistol that needs very little. Some don't find it accurate enough. My 41 S&W may out group it over the bench, but off hand, it gets better, and has the features for this kind of work. They had been selling used for around $750, far more than they cost new. But it has been some time since they stopped importing them.

    Hope this helps, Kirk
     
  12. grcsat

    grcsat Well-Known Member

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    Heres a C/P about the IZH35

    The IZH 35M is certainly not the most attractive of guns. It’s built by a Russian arms company, and it’s obvious that it has been built for practicality, rather than looks. It’ square, bulky, and really is one of the most visually unattractive target pistols you’ll find. But the practical vision behind it’s construction also means that it’s an excellent target pistol – as testament to this you only need to know that the IZH35M has, throughout it’s history, been used to win four Olympic medals, and a clutch of World Championship and European Championship medals.

    One of the other great benefits of the IZH is that – again, this is related to it’s Russian origins – it’s stupidly simple to maintain. It’s built to be repaired at minimal cost and by people who may not necessarily have all of the right tools to hand – the kind of people you find in the Russian wilderness!

    The IZH 35M used to be readily available in the United States, as it was imported by European American Army Corp (EAA), and you easily find one for under $500. These days, EAA don’t import this particular target pistol, so if you want to find one you’ll either have to look at the second hand used gun market, or at the import gun market. If you’re lucky enough to find a used Baikal IZH35M locally, you can probably get it for a shade under $500 still. If you go down the import route to pick up a new IZH35M, then expect to pay a considerable premium, which could push the price up to between $800-$1,000.

    Gary
     
  13. 300 H&H

    300 H&H Active Member

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    grcsat,

    I paid $350 for my IZH 35M many moons ago....and still find it a very adiquite shooter. Currently it wares a 4X scope, and is a favorite for ridding the yard of bunnies evey spring....Works.:cool:

    Regards, Kirk
     
  14. grcsat

    grcsat Well-Known Member

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    There's another pistol out on the market that I think will become a hit. Its the norinco copy of the colt woodsman. Talked to a few people who just recieved them and for about $150. it seems to be quite good in both finish and a good shooter.
    I'm thinking of getting myself one in the near future just to see what its all about and lets face it , for that kind of money its hard to go wrong.
     
  15. photoracer18

    photoracer18 New Member

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    Will you be able to shoot accurately every time?
    The accuracy comes from the shooter not the gun. If you can't hold the gun steady in one hand the best gun in the world will not help shooting Bullseye.
    Lots of things figure into the mix including the grade and type of ammo, shooter's breathing, weather, etc. Remember in Bullseye you are shooting at 25 yards, one handed, slow fire, timed fire, and rapid fire. I occasionally shoot it these day since I am mainly a speed steel competitor. I use one of my speed steel guns which is not setup for Bullseye, either a Browning or a S&W. I can shoot maybe 560 out of 600 on a good day at my age (63). That means I'm averaging better than 90 out of 100 for every run (93+ to be exact). So I am averaging 3 in the 10 ring and 7 in the 9 ring every run. Good but not great. The dedicated BE shooters in my club shoot in the 580+ range. Many are using Olympic style guns that make an S&W 41 seem cheap.
    Still everyone has to start somewhere and we all start out bad. Rimfire pistols are very ammo sensitive since they are all blowback actions. Some cycle certain brands and types of ammo better than others. Ammo reliability is one factor also. We tend to rate ammo by how many duds per box. Cheap bulk box ammo is the worst and they get better the more costly they get, usually. Some models of guns won't shoot standard or match velocity ammo very well (S&W 41 likes this kind of ammo). Mine don't like it so instead of shooting CCI SV ammo like most I have to use CCI Mini-Mags.
    You would be better off in my estimation if instead of buying an S&W 41 for about $1000 (used price I might add with no extras) you bought a S&W 22A (about $200 used and sometimes new).
    Just my $.02 worth.