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Discussion Starter #1
I have three reloading manuals; Lyman, 49th edition; Hornady 7th edition; Lee 2nd edition. In trying to decide on a powder and load I've been studying all three manuals and find a lot of conflicting data. In several places I've found the starting powder weight in one manual to be higher than the maximum weight in another manual. There are also differences in OAL for the same powder load with the same bullet. The question is how to tell which is correct?

I attached one example for a 9mm, 115 gr, Hornady XTP bullet. Only data from Lee and Hornady are included because Lyman does not list the 115 gr XTP. The gray cells show the problems.
 

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Lee does not do any testing, they get their info/data from powder manufacturers who have tested powder/loads over a period of time and prolly many different technicians, equipment, and lots of powder. Each powder company will use different testing equipment, components (not all 115 gr JHP bullets are the same), and maybe different methods/standards. Whoever Lee got the Bullseye data told Lee the results of their testing and Hornady tested their bullet with Bullseye and reported their results. If I were to load Hornady XTP bullets I would use Hornady data. Normally it's common to start with the low loads and work up...
 

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One problem there is that Lee doesn't do load tests. They copy others. Whose? I don't know. How old is their data? You got me.
Hornady on the other hand does do their own load testing and upgrade it periodicly.
When I use Hornady bullets, I prefer to use their data. When I use Nosler or Sierra, same thing.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I also notice that Lee almost always specifies a longer OAL than the other two. Lee seems to vary the minimum cartridge length depending on the powder for the same bullet. The others tend to use the same length for the same bullet regardless of powder.
 

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I also notice that Lee almost always specifies a longer OAL than the other two. Lee seems to vary the minimum cartridge length depending on the powder for the same bullet. The others tend to use the same length for the same bullet regardless of powder.
As stated above, Lee data is borrowed from other sources, mostly Powder Manufacturer"s free data. Lee OAL can be confusing as they often times do not list the bullet profile. Important info when loading high pressure pistol rounds.

OAL,is Bullet and Firearm specific, not manual specific. Find the longest OAL that Fits-Feed-Fires in your firearm. Gather your data and Start low and work Up.

Maybe this will help.

http://glocktalk.com/forums/blog.php?b=256
 

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You have 3 manuals, which is a very good idea. Others have already stated most of the pertinent answers to your questions. I would just add that the companies that do test often have very different firearms or test barrels. Some are more cautious on their data and others will publish loads all the way up to SAAMI specs.

This is where I would compare the test data vs my firearm and start at or near the lowest load. Begin the load work up with just a few test loads at each step so that I don't load too many rounds that may not be suitable.
 

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above answers ae correct.on the other end of the stick i always use the latest data i can find and always start on minimum loads. old semperfi
 

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Discussion Starter #8
One problem there is that Lee doesn't do load tests. They copy others. Whose? I don't know. How old is their data? You got me.
Hornady on the other hand does do their own load testing and upgrade it periodicly.
When I use Hornady bullets, I prefer to use their data. When I use Nosler or Sierra, same thing.
That makes sense to me. I was not aware that Lee did not do their own testing and that puts a whole different light on things.

It looks to me like power pistol would be the most conservative powder to start with because it has the widest range between minimum and maximum powder weights. It also looks like it can be used for both 9mm and .40 S&W and those are what I will be loading.

Anyone see any problems with that?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
As stated above, Lee data is borrowed from other sources, mostly Powder Manufacturer"s free data. Lee OAL can be confusing as they often times do not list the bullet profile. Important info when loading high pressure pistol rounds.

OAL,is Bullet and Firearm specific, not manual specific. Find the longest OAL that Fits-Feed-Fires in your firearm. Gather your data and Start low and work Up.

Maybe this will help.

http://glocktalk.com/forums/blog.php?b=256
Thanks for the link - that is very good information and it's now in my reloading bookmarks.
 

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Power Pistol a really top notch choice for 9mm and 40. Your original question; often times the load data is not similar because of different primers, COAL and barrel lengths.
 

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Excellent advice from 312 shooter on power pistol; its my favorite in 9mm.

If you look on page 340 of the Lyman manual you will see the actual bullets that they use in their testing. As it turns out, they did indeed use the xtp. Their results closely mirror Hornady's so you should be able to find common ground for a starting point. Good luck and keep us posted.
 
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