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I have been using Hoppes NO.9 since I was old enough to clean guns. While it does work, I was just wondering if there is anything that works better. I have been using frog lube for a little while now and it is working very good as a CLP, but that is hardly a copper solvent. I got my hands on a few of my paps guns, and I don't think he cleaned them since new. I got 1 of them clean to where I get no blue on the patches, but it took forever. There are so many out there, I am not really into spending money on something that isn't going to be any better than what I have now. I had thought about giving Butch's bore shine a try.
 

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Gunslick makes a foaming bore cleaner that removes copper rather quickly. Its also at removing lead.
 

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For copper fouling, my preferred solvents are Sweet's7.62 or Barnes' CR-10.

Be sure to read the labels if you're not used to using copper solvents though. Don't leave the ammonia-based solvents in the bore longer than recommended on the label (usually 10min) and be sure to clean the solvent out with regular solvent and oil afterwards. The ammonia will continue to attack the steel and you can etch the bore.
 

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As Bindernut mentioned, a lot of the copper solvents on the market use ammonia as the active ingredient. So why waste money on fancy products when you can just use ammonia itself? It's cheap and easily found at the supermarket. Or use a window cleaner that has ammonia. This is what a lot of the military surplus shooters have been doing for years - not only does it neutralize corrosive salts in the powder residue from milsurp ammunition, but it will dissolve the copper fouling in the bore. I use a cheap spray bottle filled with an ammonia/water mixture, and just spray it into the chamber, letting it run out the muzzle. Or soak patches with the stuff, and you'll get a nice satisfying blue color.

But yeah, limit the exposure time and definitely clean/dry/re-oil when done.
 

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You have a lot of options for copper solvents; some are more agressive than others. The Sweets 7.62 is heavy ammonia (makes your nose cringe) that can not be left in the bore for any length of time without possible/probable harm to the steel. Other milder solvents (butches that I use) are gentler/slower acting and can be left overnight. Read the labels and follow directions.

Removing copper will be more time intensive with just patches, you can use nylon or steel brushes to speed up the process; do not use bronze brushes as the solvent will attack the copper in the bronze and give false readings for copper removal.
Once you get the bore clean it is much easier to keep it clean with just a few patches. My opinion is to patch dry and "flush" the solvent with a Hoppes patch and then a light oil patch.
 

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I have always used Hoppes gun grease to line the the inside of the barrel and let it soak.I run a patch thru to clean out the grease and you would not believe the crud.Works well for me!
 

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As far as clean patches, you may be falling into the same catch 22 that a lot of folks fall into ( myself included ) When using a brass bore brush, there is a time to stop and just use patches, because every time you use a brass bore brush, the next patch will be green/black. Over and over.
 

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You have a lot of options for copper solvents; some are more agressive than others. The Sweets 7.62 is heavy ammonia (makes your nose cringe) that can not be left in the bore for any length of time without possible/probable harm to the steel. Other milder solvents (butches that I use) are gentler/slower acting and can be left overnight. Read the labels and follow directions.

Removing copper will be more time intensive with just patches, you can use nylon or steel brushes to speed up the process; do not use bronze brushes as the solvent will attack the copper in the bronze and give false readings for copper removal.
Once you get the bore clean it is much easier to keep it clean with just a few patches. My opinion is to patch dry and "flush" the solvent with a Hoppes patch and then a light oil patch.
I like the Butch's.. Have to do it a few more times, but I like that its not very aggressive
 
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Gunslick makes a foaming bore cleaner that removes copper rather quickly. Its also at removing lead.
That is for me the best stuff on the market. Simple easy to use.

1. Set gun in cleaning vice.
2. Clean with regular solvent.
3. Dry bore.
4. Fill bore with foam.
5. Let sit for 10 to 30 minutes.
6. Scrub bore.
7. Oil
done.
 

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As far as clean patches, you be falling into the same catch 22 that a lot of folks fall into ( myself included ) When using a brass bore brush, there is a time to stop and just use patches, because every time you use a brass bore brush, the next patch will be green/black. Over and over.
Yup. Copper solvents will attack bronze brushes.
That's what they make nylon brushes for. :)

About the only time I use bronze brushes anymore is for sccrubbing leading from a barrel or if I'm cleaning up a real rustbucket.
I use nylon for regular bore cleaning duties.
 

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Yep ammonia oil.. I also favor Montana Extreme copper killer.
 
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