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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
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Iver Johnson Champion on top, Crescent Red Chieftan on bottom. Both 12ga. Full Choke. Both were in the $125-150 range.

I inquired yesterday about the Plum colored receiver on the Iver Johnson, but inadvertently posted it in General discussions and it was deleted. 馃槱 My question is What is the reason for the color? I believe it to be re-blued as the word Champion appears to be overly buffed. Barrel is dark black and pristine. I remember reading what caused the color before, but have forgot what the cause/reason was. I know some here know the answer.

Here is a close up of the receiver. Color is evident.
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Another question - Do you think the Monte Carlo style stock on the Iver Johnson Champion is stock, or added on later? (Probably when receiver was reblued.) It is very nice, and fits perfectly.

Individual photo's of ea. Shotgun available if any interest. (Soonerfan66) If you catch me early enough in the day, my Internet might post them. My "Service" degrades/disappears as the day goes on. (?) "Terrain related" my arse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
Sorry for the double post reciever photo. Originally posted it in the OP, but it was not there. Added "Full image," and it appeared twice. (?) Never mind, It looks like I figured it out. 馃馃槈

Beautiful Case hardening on the Crescent Red Chieftan. 馃憤
 
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That plumb color is because it has been re-blued. Just about any pre-war German firearm will react the same way. I was always told it was because of the steel and the way it reacts to hot bluing.. In don't know anything about the IJ's but the German firearms were nearly all rust blued rather than hot blued. I think some 94 Winchesters acted the same way....but I might be goofy too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I am always astounded at the amount of Craftsmanship and what a beautiful working tool you can buy for $125-150 on these old Single Shots. I look for them whenever I go to pick up a new Firearm from the FFL. I am as giddy as a kid, when I get a nice one home and add it to the collection/clean it up and lube it. I have a few. I am in the perfect part of the Country to find these. I'd buy em' all day long. (And do when I find a nice one.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Yeah, I've got really long toes. My arms let my knuckles drag the ground also. So what?
What's funny, is that I lost my balance a couple times while standing on the picnic table taking these. It's at the edge of my 2nd story deck out back. (Buddy's viewing platform over his domain.) I started laughing, thinking about going over. (Would have been bad.) See, I risk life and limb for you Guy's. 馃馃榿馃

I'd love to see some Members post photo's of some of their nice old Single Shot Shotguns.
 

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Classic examples of "working man's" or "blue collar" guns. I grew up with them and Dad had a cousin who, as with yourself, collected them. I have one that belonged to my Grandpa, Dad's Dad. An old Eastern Arms 12 bore that is no longer safe to shoot. Last time I fired it was at a splatter board, meat match I took my boys to when they were in grade school, (they're in their mid and late 40's now). I bought one round and when I fired even that light load the gun came apart and the barrel hit the ground. I was standing there holding the forearm in my left hand and the butt stock in my right and the barrel was laying on the ground. It didn't blow up, it just "disassembled." I said, "boys, I believe we are done."

When the action is closed the old piece is still tight. I expect the locking spring is just weak and let go when fired. I used it squirrel hunting when I was a kid and that never happened. The darn thing kicked like the proverbial mule, as much due to the poor stock design as the light weight. Doesn't matter as it's an heirloom. I have good drillings, combination guns and one Ithaca double for when I need a shotgun.
 
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
My Grandpa's (Pap Paw) Shotguns disappeared after he passed away. (I would have loved to have had them.) I spotted them at my Uncles house a few years ago, while there for Thanksgiving dinner. My Pap Paw, did not like this individual. He would not be pleased that he has them. That Uncle passed away last year. My Pap Paw was my Buddy, and taught me about Shotguns, and let me shoot his. 1st one's I had ever shot, and probably my reason for liking them to this day.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I have a recoil pad (almost identical to the one on the Iver Johnson Champion,) to install on the Crescent Red Chieftan, gifted to me by a Firearm Forum Brother. It was missing the butt pad when purchased. I'm pretty tall, (6'1" with long arms) so the added LOP will help, not to mention the recoil reduction.
 

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I'd love to hear the reason for the purple coloring myself. You can search but most of what I found is what someone repeated from someone else. Some say it is because of rebluing and many have told of how it often reappears in time, while others say it can appear over time w/o having been reblued. Others say it is because of the silica in the investment casting that eventually causes the color to begin to appear. That might explain why we see it in cast receivers and not in cold rolled steel barrels and other parts. Rem 870's seem to have it often on the barrel ring. You hear of it with some Win 94s and model 12's depending upon their age and steel. Dan Wesson revolvers seem to have it often. I'd guess you would not see it on forged steel receivers but mostly on those that were cast. Personally, I don't care for it and wonder if it will reappear on my CA .44 Bulldog. There was just a tint of it on the frame before it was polished by their service center and reblued when it received a new barrel. Then there are the discussions of how hot the solution needs to be when rebluing to avoid making it appear along with using the correct solution to begin with.

I grew up with a Winchester 37 single shot and so also have a warm spot for them in my heart.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I appreciate your post Grizzly2. Personally, I like the plum color, it is unique and well done. I do not really understand how the barrel can be so pristine, and the receiver needing to be re-blued. (?) It has obviously been well cared for. One of my favorite firearms. The cost of the Firearm does not come into play, when I really like something. I have posted before, I have High End, to Low End. If it works, I like em'.

I would really appreciate when/if Members see and view this, I can see you post some photo's of your nice old Single shots. I'd love to see them, and have a love for them in general.
 

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That plumb color is because it has been re-blued. Just about any pre-war German firearm will react the same way. I was always told it was because of the steel and the way it reacts to hot bluing.. In don't know anything about the IJ's but the German firearms were nearly all rust blued rather than hot blued. I think some 94 Winchesters acted the same way....but I might be goofy too.
You are quite right , it is a combination of both the steel/iron used and the bluing formula.
A t one time, every manufacture had its own "secret " bluing recipy.
There are literly hundreds of bluing formulas that have not been used in a very long time.
My favorite is one that uses animal fur protine ....................gives a very rich blue black finish.

Note. I am having trouble woth my key board.
 

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Gary, I was told that by a Master Gunsmith in Germany in an exchange of e-mails. I figured he knew what he was talking about and it's good to have confirmation. You'll see it frequently someone tries to hot blue a pre-war Mauser action. I do not like it....on anything. That's purely a matter of taste and as an employer from years ago always said, "there' no accounting for taste."

I wonder how many times someone hot bluing a firearm said "Oooops, what's up with that" when he pulled a plumb colored part out of the tanks....lol!!!
 

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Palmetto State Armory has had some blem parts and receivers in the past that they've advertised to have a purple hue as a result of a defect situation. I got one of the pistol buffer tubes that has this hue. It's anodized, so I don't know what caused it on their stuff. It's not very noticeable unless you see it in bright sunlight on those parts.
 
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