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I've only shot at a few 'yotes when hunting something else, hit one with a deer slug once at 100 yds but after spinning around he dove through the fence into standing corn so I never found him...got another one "dancing" once when my arrow hit pretty close between his butt and his tail....

But I have ALWAYS wanted to hunt them...specifically.

This year in South Dakota one of my P-dog buddies bought calls and a video at Cabelas and was practicing with it, and we were thinking maybe we would try for coyotes someday besides P-dogs out there...

Of course, standing in the middle of the road with the truck running and the beeper going with the door open with two other guys in regular P-dog clothes laughing their heads off at him squeaking away probably was the reason we didn't see any...:p:p:p


But now I am back home, with a decent walking around rifle, and land to hunt with coyotes on it, I'm thinking I might try it here in Indiana...

And maybe we will get serious obout it next year in South Dakota...




But I know SQUAT about it....

Like do you use ground blinds? Camo? Hunt early morning? Night? Dusk?

What kind of calls should I buy?

And I know fur prices suck, but do you get anything for the pelts? Or can you sell the entire 'yote without skinning, since I have never skinned anything but many deer, rabbits and squirrels but without caring how GOOD the skin turned out, just to get it OFF....



Any help for a beginner, Zane, or anybody else?
 

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You can sell them whole. Hunt early morning and dusk. If you live where there's cattle you might ask a farmer if they have any dead cattle you can hunt on. Basically sit a hundred yards or however far away you feel safe shooting, where your not being silhouetted against the sky, with the wind blowing across you or preferably no wind and wait for a coyote to show up. Or you can try one of those electronic calls, basically you set the call out in the open, turn it on and begin calling.
 

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What houst said. Also, check out youtube. There are corn farmers around here that would beg for someone to thin them. They trash the corn at night and around dusk they will enter the corn to start chewing on it. There are also DVD's that are good to watch.

Also, big hint here. If you have a child living at home give them a coyote call and a practice DVD that will demo how to call and sit them in front of the TV for a wekend. Kids pick it up quick and they will mimick the call pretty closely. Then buy some camo netting and go out and lay it over the sage brush and sit under it with the kid running the call. Keep trying for about 15 minutes and then move to a new spot. When the kid is calling be watching into the wind where you can see a great distance. If they are in the area they will come in.

When you go out for the day, shower before you do and don't put on any deodorant. That will keep the cototes away for sure.

Let us know how you do. I might go do it pretty soon here myself.
 

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No Highboy. Arm and Hammer unscented works fine so you dont develop a funk. Your friends will thank you after a long hunt. :D That's what I use for any kind of hunting. Never get busted for scent using that and the cheap scent spray.

Yotes will try to come from down wind of your bait/call.

That's about all my experience hunting them. Snared a few, but never tried calling them.

If you want to see something really cool for hunting yotes, look up decoy dogs on youtube. There is a guy on a hunting site I used to go to that does this with his dog and it is amazing.
 

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It ain't hard, get a crippled rabbit call, and get ready for some action. Be sure to use a cover sent. I like Red Fox urine for all of my hunting. I also store my hunting clothing in a plastic bag with a strong smelling natural plant. Down here in the south I use the tips of young branches from a pine tree.
 

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Get in a John Deere tractor and start working ground in the spring next to heavy cover where they live and have their dens. They will come out looking for a meal in the middle of the day if they are close to the their cover. I've had them get as close as 10 feet or less and almost get hit by the 26 foot disc and step right in behind the disc looking for the field mice. No kidding I have shot acouple from the tractor cab, but you have to be fast. You can stop and they won't move but the second you move to open the door they beat feet and fast. Other than that I hunt near dairy farms. I try to get in a high position where I have a better view. At day light and dusk only. Dairy farms have feed, critters, afterbirth and newly born calves tails. Get permission first.
 

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You are getting some good advise here. I would like to give you something to think about. Try to remember this it always helped me. P. A.W.S.( P) is for protection use whats around sage brush, tumble weeds, dead trees, hay bails, old houses and machinery etc etc . Any thing that looks natural and belongs there well work.(A) is for altitude when possible use high ground being able to see whats coming and going both directions is always a good idea. (W) is for (and this is big) wind keep it in your favor you want it in your face and if you show up to your spot and the wind is blowing the wrong direction leave save it for another day.(S) is for sun try and keep it on your back and in their eyes. cammo every thing you can the sun glare off a gun and scope can be seen for miles by a older smart coyote. The same goes for your face it well light up real nice in that bright mourning sun. Well I could go on for ever but that's enough that is my 2cents worth hope it helps.
 

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I read a story about a mechanic. He hunted deer in the same field every year and he would always wear his work coveralls. They were dirty and had grease all over them. But he always got a nice deer, the reason was that a couple of weeks before deer season started he would drive an old tractor over to the field he hunted. The tractor was dirty, but greasy. On opening morning he would sneak up to his tractor in his coveralls and wait for shooting light. Shooting light would come and he would shoot is deer. The deer were used to the strong odor of the tractor and he blended right in with his coveralls.
 

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Cammo to the max, head to toe and cover your sent! All posts above is all good advice.
I usually keep my "coyote huntin' clothes" in a bag with all natural sent, ea., if I'm hunting in an area with some pine trees. ceder and etc., put that in with the clothes in a sealed bag.

I've used and still do from time to time, electronic calls but have had more "luck" with hand held mouth calls. I've got different DVD's with other people hunting using hand held moth calls and have watched them over and over till I get the sounds down pat.

I'll usually carry several mouth calls with me, a locator call, doe-fawn call and a rabbit
in distress call.
About the most important (IMO) advice I can give you, what ever calls your going to go with, get them down pat!!! (the right sounds and loudness, depending on the "area" your in)

Over calling is not good and not enough is the same...basically trial and error when starting out calling in a particular area.

And another thing also, the coyotes will pick up on your "calling mistakes" and they do remember! If your hunting an area and start out having good luck and it ends, switch up the calls and move from place to place each time out.

Their sense of smell and eye sight as far as picking up on movement is 2nd to none.
Patience will go a LONG ways. It aint hard, just practice and patience and learning as much as possible about them will go a long ways.
 

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there's plenty of abandoned farm houses and barns to hide upstairs in while looking out a window.

look me up next time, I would gladly come along. I may even get some spots myself
 

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there's plenty of abandoned farm houses and barns to hide upstairs in while looking out a window.

look me up next time, I would gladly come along. I may even get some spots myself
I'm going to set my tree stand up tomorrow, if time permits.
I've never hunted Coyotes out of a stand before, but saw a program on
the sportsman's channel or outdoors(?) and it looked like a great idea.
I've got about a 50 acre field that is all hilly and alot of tall grass/brush all
over it. And also the field is all about a 30* or so slope all down hill.

Tree stand on top and hunt with and electronic call when the wind is
"right" to according to my stand.
 

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I don't kill anything warm & furry anymore.
There are only 3 things that I will go after....

Copperheads, Coyotes & People that piss me off !
 

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I don't do yote's in the spring or summer unless they're being a nuisance to the cattle. I wait till winter so the hides are prime.


68's suggestion to pick the high ground using buildings around an abandoned farmstead does work. I don't like the limited visiblity though. If the roofs are in good shape, I do like to use those.
My favorite "high ground" stand is a pile of round hay bales. You can nestle in on the second row from the top so you've got something to break your skyline silhouette and the elevated position give you better line of sight.
My preferred snow-camo is just a plain ole white bedsheet slip cover and brown duck coveralls underneath. Blends in very well with a snowy bale pile.
Fall camo, just a good stained pair of brown duck coveralls blends in with fall grass.
Can you tell I grew up on a ranch yet?...I just can't see spending $100+ on a camo suit just for yotes. :)
 

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Maybe it's the location. But even back in the late 70's and early 80's when party or whatever late evening they would be nuisance. Especially if you had fire and cooking anything. We use to go out with tractor & wagon out to creek for cookouts. They would ease up close, just edge of light from fire. Going back home often they follow wagon all the way to house.
We use to even howl late at night riding loop in town and get them howling back.
I don't know about now but back then around here there was bounty on coyotes.
 
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