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Had an issue arise today while reloading 9mm. I'm using the Hornady single-stage press. For seating and crimping I'm using the Hornady Taper Crimp Seater combo die. Although somewhat tricky to set up I thought I had it working pretty well until the following issue: After raising the press ram to the top of the stroke and seating a bullet (Hornady 115gr XTP HP), when I began to lower the ram and as the cartridge was coming down it seemed to snag and then release from the die. When I looked at the cartridge, the case (new Remington brass) was scored horizontally in one area approximately 3/8 of an inch. I removed the bullet and it too was scored all the way around. Attached is a photo showing this (I hope it's visible). The score on the bullet seems to coincide with the the case mouth and the score on the case seems to coincide with the bottom of the bullet.

Could this be an issue of just having the crimp adjusted down too far? After this episode I backed the crimp adjustment off until I really couldn't tell if I was getting any sort of crimp. I had no further "snag" issues when lowering the ram after that but I also want to make sure all's well. The bullets seemed tight in the case (I pushed on them against a hard surface and there was no movement), and the cartridges all fit within the case gauge. Also, the measurement at the case mouth was around .377" to .378". I had read somewhere the measurement should be .376" for a taper crimp on 9mm. Then I read another article (Handloader magazine, Feb. 2013 issue) where it stated the crimp measurement as between .369" and .370". I don't think there would be any way I could approach these numbers (.369 - .370) without the problems I was having occurring.

Am I missing something or is there a problem with my setup? Thanks in advance.
 

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I've had the same problem and the problem was I didn't have the die adjusted correctly. You need to use one or more dummy rounds to make the adjustments. First back the crimp completely off. Do this by putting an empty case in the shell holder and raising the ram to put the case all the way in the die. If there is any resistance back off the crimp until the case goes in with out any resistance. Then put a bullet in the case and raise the ram until you feel resistance and adjust the seater until you get the correct OAL. Measure the OAL and repeat until you get it right. When the length is correct raise the ram with the bullet seated to the correct length and lower the crimp adjustment until you feel resistance. Lower the ram then move the crimp part about about 1/2 to 3/4 turn down. Be sure the seating stem does not move as you adjust the crimp - that is the tricky part.
 

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First off, I have that same issue of handloader and the information about the crimp daimeter is wrong. If you take .355" as the bullet diameter and subtract this from .369"-.370" this gives you a brass thickness of .0045" or .005" at the case mouth. The 9mm case is about .010"-.011" at the case mouth, which will give you a loaded crimp diameter of .3745"-.376" depending on brass thickness. Another hint do not seat the bullet and crimp at the same step, always apply your crimp as a separate step at the end.
 

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Techniques aside, the fact that there is a strong imprint around the jacketing of the bullet is stone cold indication of excessive crimp. Back off!
If necessary seat all the bullets without any crimp then back the seater stem way off, screw the die body back down to crimp and run them them through as a second step. Pull a bullet and check if there is any crimp indication in the copper jacket you have gone too far!!
 

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I would also suggest crimping as the final step, after seating. It's a little more time, but IMO, a better made round.

From your picture, I am pretty sure you set up the crimp portion of the die improperly. Once your crimp is set, lock down the die ring and then adjust your seating depth if you are going to do both in one step.
 

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JC had the same problem with my RCBS dies, I use the seater/crimp die just to seat the bullet and I use a Lee Factory Crimp Die for my crimping. Problem Solved.
 

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Here's the sequence I use:

1. Back the die out of the press so that no crimp can be made.

2. Using the seating stem adjustment, lower it until it seats the bullet to the correct overall length (OAL) with NO crimp.

3. Remove the seating stem.

4. Lower the die progressively until the crimp is right... You can pull bullets to check for the ring or just push on the bullet to make sure it can not move into the case and there is a detectable crimp. Lock the die down. DON"T over do the crimp!

5. Using the test cartridge at the correct OAL and that you crimped as a gage, put the cartridge into the shell holder, move the table of the press all the way up, and gently lower the seat stem until it just touches the test round's bullet. Lock down the seating stem.

6. Make a few test rounds with the die set up as above and verify all is right.

LDBennett
 

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While the instruction I posted above is for a combo seating/crimping die used to seat and crimp at the same time, it is better still to use two separate dies. The other option if you are using a single stage press is to set up the combo die separately for each operation and separate the processes using the combo die. That is, set it up for seating then set it up for crimp only by removing the seating stem and lowering the die in the press (a little at a time until the crimp is correct).This means two passes in the press for any one round for seating and crimping


For pistol rounds there are several crimp only dies, both taper and roll crimp, depending on whether the ammo is for a semi-auto or a revolver.

For rifle rounds I like the LEE FACTORY CRIMP die (FCD) as it does an excellent job. It pushes horizontally on the case to do the crimp whereas a regular rifle crimp is done vertically with the opportunity to bulge the case if setup wrong. But you still should not over crimp! The Rifle FCD is about the only LEE product that I like. If you are new here, I never recommend anything by LEE except the LEE FCD.

The LEE FCD for pistols does not work the same and I do not think it offers anything over a separate crimp die by others.

LDBennett
 

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I'm in the same camp as LDBennett when it come to Lee products, usually. I have a Lee crimp die with a carbide insert. This is to remove any minor case irregularities, such as the Glock bulge. This thing works just as they say it should, I have to admit I'm impressed with it. I did however, take off the Lee O-Ring locking ring and replaced it with a Lyman lock ring and it works fantastic
 

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Here's the sequence I use:

1. Back the die out of the press so that no crimp can be made.

2. Using the seating stem adjustment, lower it until it seats the bullet to the correct overall length (OAL) with NO crimp.

3. Remove the seating stem.

4. Lower the die progressively until the crimp is right... You can pull bullets to check for the ring or just push on the bullet to make sure it can not move into the case and there is a detectable crimp. Lock the die down. DON"T over do the crimp!

5. Using the test cartridge at the correct OAL and that you crimped as a gage, put the cartridge into the shell holder, move the table of the press all the way up, and gently lower the seat stem until it just touches the test round's bullet. Lock down the seating stem.

6. Make a few test rounds with the die set up as above and verify all is right.

LDBennett
I like that procedure better than mine. Believe I'll try that next time I reload.
 

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Twicepop and others:

If I had a gun that bulged the cases I might consider the LEE Pistol FCD but I don't. For me (and most people) the carbide die serves no purpose unless you over crimp so much that you bulge the cases during crimping. A bulge developed during crimping is poor adjustment of the crimp die and i feel the LEE Pistol FCD is not needed and offers nothing you can not get out of a separate crimp die by others.

The carbide ring at the base of the LEE PISTOL FCD die, I am told (???), will not reach all the way to the point that the GLOCK bulges the cases and a different die by someone else is the solution for GLOCK users. I have no plastic guns so I have no need for this die either.

LDBennett
 

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Had an issue arise today while reloading 9mm. I'm using the Hornady single-stage press. For seating and crimping I'm using the Hornady Taper Crimp Seater combo die. Although somewhat tricky to set up I thought I had it working pretty well until the following issue: After raising the press ram to the top of the stroke and seating a bullet (Hornady 115gr XTP HP), when I began to lower the ram and as the cartridge was coming down it seemed to snag and then release from the die. When I looked at the cartridge, the case (new Remington brass) was scored horizontally in one area approximately 3/8 of an inch. I removed the bullet and it too was scored all the way around. Attached is a photo showing this (I hope it's visible). The score on the bullet seems to coincide with the the case mouth and the score on the case seems to coincide with the bottom of the bullet.

Could this be an issue of just having the crimp adjusted down too far? After this episode I backed the crimp adjustment off until I really couldn't tell if I was getting any sort of crimp. I had no further "snag" issues when lowering the ram after that but I also want to make sure all's well. The bullets seemed tight in the case (I pushed on them against a hard surface and there was no movement), and the cartridges all fit within the case gauge. Also, the measurement at the case mouth was around .377" to .378". I had read somewhere the measurement should be .376" for a taper crimp on 9mm. Then I read another article (Handloader magazine, Feb. 2013 issue) where it stated the crimp measurement as between .369" and .370". I don't think there would be any way I could approach these numbers (.369 - .370) without the problems I was having occurring.

Am I missing something or is there a problem with my setup? Thanks in advance.
The problem is (I know you may not believe it) is not flaring the case mouth enough... flare it enough that the bullet will stick in the case and the WILL solve the problem
 

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Welcome to the forum, but you have answered a five year old question!!
 
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