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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Shot my second USPSA match of the year today. Finished #26 out of 26. First two matches of the year and I finished at the bottom of the barrel for both. I don’t know what is going wrong. Even when I shot my very first match, I didn’t finish last. I am never very high up in the scoring but I was never last either. Now my last two matches have gone straight into the toilet.

And to add insult to injury, I botched the qualifier stage because my gun didn’t feel like going back into battery through half a magazine. Rack, tap, bang. 🙄

Maybe I should switch from single stack to carry optics.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You will get it all straitened out Willie . Like anything else we all get in a slump time to time . I can't remember what rifle and type of shooting do you do ?
No rifles. Colt 1911 in 9mm. I shoot Single Stack division in USPSA. More or less running an obstacle course while shooting targets. But don’t shoot the hostages.

I think part of what’s killing me is the fact that I’m shooting minor power factor since I use a 9mm. Minor power factor scores a point less than major for anything outside of the “A” zone on the target. If I have the exact same shot placement as someone shooting major, they will still score higher than me. Major power factor is 40 caliber and up and it’s really only an issue in Single Stack.
 

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GUNZILLA
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Maybe you are putting to much pressure on yourself, enjoy the event for what it is. If not , than ask yourself this question are you putting as much time as Miculek does sending lead down range, if not, don't expect those results. Take it in stride and just have fun and learn from the more experience shooters you meet .
 

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Gotcha ... Think we may of talked about this before maybe or someone else who does same thing . One question and it's just cause I am curious why 9mm over 40 cal and up . Less recoil , quicker back on target ? I know few people who do what they call run and gun . To much like exercise for me !
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Gotcha ... Think we may of talked about this before maybe or someone else who does same thing . One question and it's just cause I am curious why 9mm over 40 cal and up . Less recoil , quicker back on target ? I know few people who do what they call run and gun . To much like exercise for me !
I went with 9mm because of less recoil, you can have one more round than major power factor and 9mm WAS cheap when I started this. 40 or 45 would have cost too much since I wasn’t reloading at the time. Now they all cost too much.
 

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Look at the bright side, you shot 2 more matches than you though you would :)
And keep in mind, it is not an easy game and small mistakes can get punished pretty hard. And don't say 26 out of 26 unless all 26 are shooting classic. Classic is the division with the biggest handicap apart from revolver. You will always loose out to production or limited, let alone CO or Open.

Can you share the Practiscore link for the match? What is it you are having the most problems with? Any video footage?
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Can you share the Practiscore link for the match? What is it you are having the most problems with? Any video footage?

No video footage. I really need to invest in a GoPro one of these days.

As far as my biggest issues:

1) I need to work on stage planning more. Even when I do walk a stage, what I see in my head is not what happens. I also need to keep track of my rounds better.

2) Accuracy. I had 11 Mikes in the match. I know that gun is more accurate than that. I just start rushing shots.

And where handicaps are concerned, there was a guy shooting revolver yesterday. He still beat me with his 7 rounds to my 10.
 

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When my SIL started shooting trap with us he thought he could shoot as well as we could with 10 years of experience. At 1st he blamed his shotgun. Bought an expensive shotgun but it didn't help. It's his second season and he still can't shoot at our level. My son is one of the best shooters in the club. He will never shoot at his level. I am an over-the-hill shooter at 71 with poor eyesight and a bad shoulder. He still can't beat me.

It takes time and practice. If it was easy it wouldn't be much fun. Pay your dues with time and practice. Don't give up or blame your equipment.
 

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Before you read the rest of my reply let me make clear I am trying to help and I am in no way trying to sound condescending or shoot you down. I am trying to word this as friendly as possible but we have a language and written language barrier.

First: USPA is hard, shooting on a time limit is hard let alone when you also have to move between positions. It is not something you just pick up unless your fundamentals are already spot on.
Take as an example a plate rack @ 10 yards, everyone can shoot the entire rack without missing once. Now stand next to them with a stopwatch and watch what happens.

What Shooter said, you may have to get back to the basic and work on the fundamentals. Without actually seeing you shoot and seeing how the stages look (USPSA usually does not have a lot of difficult shots compared to IPSC) it is hard to tell what your issue is.
However over 1 in 10 shots was a mike and there is no way to make up for that, so that will be the thing you need to work on first. Do you happen to know when you missed the most shots? Was it the 2nd shot, moving into or out of position or something else?
With this many mikes it almost has to be something basic, either jerking the pistol off target when pulling the trigger or sight alignment like not having the patience to wait for an acceptable sight picture before pulling the trigger. You could also be "double-tapping" targets, double taps do not exist, every shot should be an aimed shot. (there are some exceptions as with everything)
The best advice I ever had was " You can only shoot as fast as you can see your sights". Sounds stupid but you can't argue with that.

Also dry-fire is your friend, pick up your gun daily and do some dry fire. Even if you only do 10 to 15 mins every day you will improve very rapidly, even the pros dry-fire a lot.

An easy drill to check if you are pulling the trigger correctly: (Dry fire, all safety precautions should be taken)
Aim the gun at the wall, no target required, focus on the front sight and pull the trigger, the front sight should not move at all. Now try pulling the trigger quicker and quicker like you would do in a match. In a match you don't have (or take) the time to build up pressure until it breaks, you just slap/pull it.
Download a shot timer app with a random start signal, get ready to shoot and on the tone pull the trigger as fast as you can without moving the front sight.
Yes, this is a very basic drill but harder than it sounds and vital if you want to make your shots.

El-presidente is also a nice dry-fire drill, record your times and you will see improvement during the weeks ahead. Be honest with yourself though, don't call a C or D as an A and a mike is a mike.

If you are having troubles with the 2nd shot on target do the doubles drill in live fire:
Aim at the center of the target and take 2 shots as quick as you can while staying within the A-zone. Set the target at different distances.
There is no time limit on this drill apart from taking the 2 shots as quick as you can.
This drill will also tell you how your recoil control is, the first shot should be a good center alpha, the grouping of the 2nd shots will tell you if you are holding the gun correctly, using the correct trigger technique etc.
The drill can eat a lot of ammo quick though.

As for 1), you cannot keep track of rounds fired during a stage. You need to plan mag changes during the walkthrough e.g. Shoot array 1, array 2, mag change, array 3, mag change etc.
In SS when in doubt, change mags. Don't forget to calculate a miss or 2 on steel targets, if you have an array of 2 paper, 2 steel, change mags after that array no matter what.
Stage planning and execution is something that really comes with practice expect to screw up a lot when starting out in USPSA. Keep it simple and don't change your plan after your walk-through.

If you could get someone to film you on your phone that would also be useful if you want more unsolicited advice :)

Do not forget we are supposed to be doing this to have fun :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Sound advice from all of you. I know I need to spend more time practicing. I should start doing dry fires at least. Instead of sitting in front of the TV when I come home from work, that will give me something else to do. Thanks to all of you. Your advice is genuinely deeply appreciated.
 

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TFF Chaplain
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Don't be discouraged, WillieB. I go to competitions, and come in last, or a few from the bottom. Once in a while I come in somewhere in the middle. The only thing I do well in is black powder cartridge or muzzle loading rifle comps, where I can take my time. We have 30 minutes to fire 10 rounds.

I go for the fun. It is a chance to shoot alongside others, talk back and forth with some people I haven't seen for a while. I tell everyone I'm there to make everyone else look good.

Vassago gave some great pointers. Dry fire is great practice.
 
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