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You could invest in one of laser dryfire systems.
First image is one as an example.
250372


Look at this website for other suggestions.
250373


FYI. The winning competitors both practice dryfire and shooting live ammo. LOTS OF AMMO per year. Some practice shooting as much as 40,000 rounds of ammo per year.

Practice, practice, practice. But perfect practice is key to perfection. The most important is training eye hand coordination and muscle memory.

Single action autoloading pistol are harded to train with as apposed to a double action pistol or revolver. Jerry Miculek always shoots a double action revolver because in his early competition years because he could dryfire practice, practice, practice at home, so when he would go to compete, his trigger pull, eye hand coordination, and muscle memory was the same. In one of his YouTube videos he claims that ge has probably fired over a million rounds of ammo in practice.

When I used to compete in IHMSA in the Unlimited Class, I would go to a separate gun range the day before or sometimes that same day prior to competing and shoot a two to three full match 40 rounds, that’s 80-120 rounds, then go shoot the match. I would also practice at least once a week shooting. Doing that, I would shoot a perfect 40x40 score, plus win the shoot off at the local club that hoasted the monthly matches. (Shoot off is chicken targets @ 200 yards.) Doing all that practice allowed me to be the top winning competitor at that club one year. In that one year, I shot about 3,000 rounds in just practice, and doing so, I burnt out two barrels on my T/C Contender chambered in 7mmT/CU. Luckily for me, I have a good friend who’s father had a FFL and would get supplies like loading components at wholesale cost for me. As a side note. I used Nosler Ballistic Tips for both practice and in competition, but at wholesale cost it was affordable, plus I was single and making good money so I afford the cost of all that practice. The reason I mention this is that the Nosler BT were the most affecting bullet for nocking over steel targets, and were by far the most expensive bullet one could use. But as I learned in auto racing, if you want to win, you have spend money. LOTS OF MONEY. Ask Roger Penske how much money he has spent to win.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
You could invest in one of laser dryfire systems.
First image is one as an e
View attachment 250372

Look at this website for other suggestions.
View attachment 250373

FYI. The winning competitors both practice dryfire and shooting live ammo. LOTS OF AMMO per year. Some practice shooting as much as 40,000 rounds of ammo per year.

Practice, practice, practice. But perfect practice is key to perfection. The most important is training eye hand coordination and muscle memory.

Single action autoloading pistol are harded to train with as apposed to a double action pistol or revolver. Jerry Miculek always shoots a double action revolver because in his early competition years because he could dryfire practice, practice, practice at home, so when he would go to compete, his trigger pull, eye hand coordination, and muscle memory was the same. In one of his YouTube videos he claims that ge has probably fired over a million rounds of ammo in practice.

When I used to compete in IHMSA in the Unlimited Class, I would go to a separate gun range the day before or sometimes that same day prior to competing and shoot a two to three full match 40 rounds, that’s 80-120 rounds, then go shoot the match. I would also practice at least once a week shooting. Doing that, I would shoot a perfect 40x40 score, plus win the shoot off at the local club that hoasted the monthly matches. (Shoot off is chicken targets @ 200 yards.) Doing all that practice allowed me to be the top winning competitor at that club one year. In that one year, I shot about 3,000 rounds in just practice, and doing so, I burnt out two barrels on my T/C Contender chambered in 7mmT/CU. Luckily for me, I have a good friend who’s father had a FFL and would get supplies like loading components at wholesale cost for me. As a side note. I used Nosler Ballistic Tips for both practice and in competition, but at wholesale cost it was affordable, plus I was single and making good money so I afford the cost of all that practice. The reason I mention this is that the Nosler BT were the most affecting bullet for nocking over steel targets, and were by far the most expensive bullet one could use. But as I learned in auto racing, if you want to win, you have spend money. LOTS OF MONEY. Ask Roger Penske how much money he has spent to win.
Unfortunately, I don’t have the time or resources to put in that much practice. Especially now with the shortage of ammo and reloading supplies. Getting to the range once a week would be a blessing but he is open limited hours, usually when I’m at work. I go when I can. Dry firing is something I know I can do regularly. I’ll check into the laser devices. You’re right about SA being harder to dry fire since I have to rack the slide every time. However, I have no delusions of ever being a national level competitor. I would just like to score better at my local matches.
 

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You've done it before without coming in last so you can do it again.

Obviously your biggest problem is accuracy. Eleven Mikes will kill you and get you in last at almost any competition.

Dry fire is your friend. Spend some time killing the T.V. ( NO AMMO ANYWHERE IN THE ROOM).

Remember, there is no truck in the parking lot for the winner so have fun.

I use an old revolver for dry fire. Yes it's a bit different but I'm looking at watching the sight
 

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Single Stack is a tough division to start out doing. Stage planning has as much to do with it as shooting.
Maybe try limited or Carry Optics so you have less to think about during the stages.
 

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Don't be discouraged, WillieB. I go to competitions, and come in last, or a few from the bottom. Once in a while I come in somewhere in the middle. The only thing I do well in is black powder cartridge or muzzle loading rifle comps, where I can take my time. We have 30 minutes to fire 10 rounds.

I go for the fun. It is a chance to shoot alongside others, talk back and forth with some people I haven't seen for a while. I tell everyone I'm there to make everyone else look good.

Vassago gave some great pointers. Dry fire is great practice.
Wow 10 shots in 30 min. doesn't sound like much but when you figure one shot every 3 min. that's flying. It takes me about 2 min. just to load my ML. I wonder how many ram rods get shot down range. LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
Single Stack is a tough division to start out doing. Stage planning has as much to do with it as shooting.
Maybe try limited or Carry Optics so you have less to think about during the stages.
I’ve been considering carry optics but I’m also looking at what it’s going to cost to replace almost all of my gear to do so. If I sold the 1911 and the mags, I could probably break even but I really don’t want to part with it. I need to dwell on this a bit.
 
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