The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
Just joined the forum after I got the bug to shoot my 61 Navy. I haven't shot it in about 35 years and as my wife hasn't used Crisco in a long time so I have a few questions.
1 Do you put a wad over the powder or over the ball? Is the wad a replacement for Crisco? Is a wad really necessary?
2 Is there some type of lube for the cylinder pin on the 61 Navy? (seem to remember having to clean the soot off of it after about 12 shots.) What about a general lube for the gun itself? Haven't seen any whale oil in a long time.
3 If not Crisco, then what?
4. As I remember I set the barrel/cylinder gap at 0.006in. Any other recommendations?
5. I can't remember how much powder I used. Any advise? What about powder funnels/flasks and a devise to cap the nipples? Found a tin of Remington #10 caps in the box and remembered that the Imported #11's didn't fit very well, while Remington # 10's worked great.
Any other advise is definitely welcome.
Thanks,
Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,299 Posts
The wad that I'm aware of is called a Wonder Wad. It is lubricated felt. It goes over the powder and under the ball. It takes the place of the crisco.

General lube? Ballistol. http://www.ballistol.com/ It smells kinda like licorice, which some folks don't like.

If you don't wanna use crisco, there's some store-bought stuff called Bore Butter. Whatever you do, don't use any petroleum products. Petroleum and black powder don't like each other. Petroleum-based lube turns black powder fouling into concrete.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,725 Posts
A wad under the ball is less messy. Powder charge would be 18-25 grains with a .375 ball. If the cylinder gap is adjustable that means the arbor hole is drilled too deep. Cylinder gap is not adjustable on a correctly fitted gun. Cleanup is with hot soapy water. No petroleum lubes in the bore or chambers unless you want to make sure its all cleaned out before you shoot it again. Petro lubes are ok in the action itself.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,299 Posts
If your gun is brass framed, keep the charge at the low end of that range Hawg gave. A steel-framed gun can take the pounding of a heavy charge. Brass can't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,431 Posts
Those Wonder Wads, brand name or generic come in 100 packs. The same size as your balls (box of 100).
And for me are much nicer than grease or Crisco, etc.
In my .44s I use 25 grains and get real nice accuracy, and a nice big bang (and plenty of smoke).
So I see no need to overdo it.
dc
 

·
TFF Chaplain
Joined
·
20,470 Posts
Welcome to the forum, mchuray. You've found a treasure trove of info here, with loads of friendly people who have tons of experience that they are glad to share. One of the unspoken rules on this forum is that the only dumb question is the unasked one. We all start out from scratch. You will probably remember a lot after 35 years, but it never hurts to ask.

I came across this post a while back and found it useful: I bought one bag of 100 wonder wads and have made my own since.

http://www.thefirearmsforum.com/showpost.php?p=774042&postcount=16

I load the powder, put in the wad, then the ball. If the ball is the correct size you should see a thin "wire" of lead shaved off the ball when you ram it into the cylinder. For me, that and the wad are enough to stop a chain fire...so far.

I pinch the caps slightly before putting them on. I've tried cap holders, but I like fingers better.

Most people like black powder; I use pyrodex because I don't need the special explosive permit or storage box that are required for that over here.

I use a powder flask with a measure on it appropriate to my caliber. Someone suggested I could "tailor" my loads. Put the pre-measured powder in a .223 case and close it off with a spent .22 case.

As said, hot soapy water for clean up, and in the oven at very low temp to dry it off; some use their dishwasher.

I coat the whole thing with a light layer of machine oil; haven't yet worked out the perfect lube for the cylinder pin.

Be safe, have fun, and give us a range report.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,376 Posts
I use bore butter on the cylinder pin, wash it off when I clean the revolver and put more on, also use that on the bore and cylinders after cleaning, no need to overdo it. I use the Wonder wads under the ball, no grease or crisco over the top. I use a capper to put the percussion caps on, saw a post on one of the forums I frequent where a fellow had a cap go off when he pushed it onto the nipple, wasn't pretty. I shoot Pyrodex P or triple f, 20-25 grains. I have a powder flask with a dispenser, use that to put powder into my adjustable measure, which has a little funnel that slides over the end to use to dump it into the bore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,725 Posts
I use a capper to put the percussion caps on, saw a post on one of the forums I frequent where a fellow had a cap go off when he pushed it onto the nipple, wasn't pretty.
There's more to that story than he's telling. Caps are not pressure sensitive. You can put all the pressure on one you want to and you can't make one go off that way. It takes an impact to set one off. Besides that, a cap wouldn't do that much damage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks All for the replies. You have answered the questions I've had. Now if only I can find some .375 lead balls or a mold. May even try to find a conical bullet mold or some already cast.
Thanks Again,
Mark
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,189 Posts
.375 round balls are what I use in my .36 police C&B pistol, I've always used Crisco myself. cheap and easy if not a bit more messy. Wads are good but crisco is easier IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,299 Posts
Midwayusa has the Lee doublecavity 375 round ball mold in stock. Or they did two days ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,304 Posts
Save the conicals for rifles, they are a pain in the yuppers to load in the cylinders. You will find the round balls out of your gun to be surprisingly accurate and a light load of 15 to 18 gr of FFFg Goex will give you a lot of shooting out of a pound with no degradation of effectiveness.

mogunner pretty much nailed it with his bore butter comment and everything else he said. Never had a cap go off accidentally, more likely to have to do multiple strikes on one than to have one go off from installing on the nipples. I'm new in the black powder game but enthusiastic and already made my share of mistakes to learn by. Listen to these guys and you can avoid some of them.

Like not pushing the ball down far enough and the ball only goes part way out of the cylinder locking up your gun. :confused:

Had to do it twice before I learned to add a pinch of cornmeal to raise the level so my loading rod would seat the ball firmly on the powder. Works a lot better and it's still a nice light easy to shoot load.

The rest of my booboos I will keep to myself, there were no witnesses so I have to admit nothing. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,725 Posts
On a loaded cylinder it sure would. Normally the hammer absorbs the impact of the gases that come back out of the nipple, your thumb is a lot softer than steel.

http://www.cascity.com/forumhall/index.php/topic,1620.0.html
I still call B.S. There's no way that cap went off from thumb pressure. If you ask me he stuck it up by the front of the cylinder and fired the gun and is trying to cover up his stupidity. I've had chain fires before and have had my hand and arm peppered by cap fragments. If they had that kind of force they would have drawn blood but they didn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Well we went shooting this weekend and had a great time. Grandson, son-in-law, and nephew all got to pop a cap a few times. Used 777 as I could not find any BP locally. Had to use #11 caps also so they had to be crimped. Used up all of my old .375 balls so I'm going to order some .380 cast balls off he web. Nephew liked it so much that he is going to get an 1860 that he knows is for sale. Grandson was loading the old 1861 Colt like a pro. All in all everyone is ready to shoot some cap & ball again. I might even look for some kind of 44 at the right price. Thanks again all for the advise it sure was helpful.
Mark
 

·
TFF Chaplain
Joined
·
20,470 Posts
Thanks for the range report. Sounds like all had a great time and it was a successful day. Any pictures?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
298 Posts
The .36 Navy is a hoot to shoot. Not a lot of power although Mr. Hickok would disagree. With a shoulder stock a great little squirrel gun. The Ruger New Army is another fine revolver with the advantage that you can get a cylinder that will take .45 Colt cartridges.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,725 Posts
The .36 Navy is a hoot to shoot. Not a lot of power although Mr. Hickok would disagree. With a shoulder stock a great little squirrel gun. The Ruger New Army is another fine revolver with the advantage that you can get a cylinder that will take .45 Colt cartridges.

Ruger OLD Army. You can get conversion cylinders for any of the Colt, Remington designs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11 Posts
Hawg, this is what works for my CVA 1860 Army .44 and Pietta 1858 New Army .44, 25 grains triple f pyrodex, 10 grains corn mill, a cleaning patch, and a round ball, goes off without a hitch everytime and no chain fires since using this combo.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top