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I have a Derringer pistol in my possession that I am putting in a shadow box for my father in law. He would like it if I could find out more identifying information about it so I can make a nice plaque with the name and such for the box. Help!!! It has the circle with ELG* in it which I saw somewhere it's Belgium. Here's some pictures.
 

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Common 19th century Belgian percussion pistol of about .38 caliber.

Many were made there by anonymous "cottage industry" craftsmen.

They are not usually referred to as derringers.
 

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Too large to be considered a derringer. it is a type of small percussion pistol that was made by the hundred of thousand's if not millions by all of the European n countries. in this case . yes it was made in Belgium . If there is no name on it it was most likely made by a consortium or makers. To fill an large order that was way too large for a single small maker ( and there were a multitude of such ) the work would be contracted out to a number of different makers, all making the same product, since there was no single maker, there is no single maker mark on the gun. It is a turn barrel gun, the barrel is removed for loading, that's why there are those strange gear like teeth visible in the end of the barrel. A T-Bar key tool was inserted into the barrel to screw it off. Best I can do, perhaps others will have more information, Good Luck and shoot safe. ah ha, hrf beat me today :)
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Too large to be considered a derringer. it is a type of small percussion pistol that was made by the hundred of thousand's if not millions by all of the European n countries. in this case . yes it was made in Bel. If there is no name on it it was most likely made by a consortium or makers. To fill an large order that was way too large for a single small maker ( and there were a multitude of such ) the work would be contracted out to a number of different makers, all making the same product, since there was no single maker, there is no single maker mark on the gun. It is a turn barrel gun, the barrel is removed for loading, that's why there are those strange gear like teeth visible in the end of the barrel. A T-Bar key tool was inserted into the barrel to screw it off. Best I can do, perhaps others will have more information, Good Luck and shoot safe. ah ha, hrf beat me today :)
Thank you so much for your time!
 

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I have always read and heard them referred to as "Queen Anne screw guns". Nothing untoward meant by that except that the barrel screws off. Not a lot of value to most of them. The "Saturday Night Special" or "two dollar pistol" of their day.
 
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That particular design is also often called a "London Pistol". While there was a brand called "London", anything resembling such were called that.
 
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I've heard pistols around that size called "boot pistols". Smaller versions are
often called "muff pistols".
Yep, them too!
 
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