The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an old spanish .32 auto. On the left side of the slide it says, as best as I can make out, "F.A.M. GARATE ANITUA .co EIBAR" . Under this "The Best 32 something . I can get the barrel out, but can't get the slide out. Any help?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,379 Posts
On most of those guns, the slide is pulled back to a certain point, the barrel turned to unlock it and removed, then the slide should come off to the front. If it doesn't, it might not be overriding the hammer, or the hammer might not stay cocked. Garate y Anitua was one of the better makers, but that is not saying much.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the answer. I thought it should be that way, the barrel comes off if you have the slide back as far as it will go, but the slide won't come off. I will try checking to make sure the hammer is cocked.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,000 Posts
acepi - I had one of those Spanish Eibar .32 ACP something or another semi auto pistols many years ago. Jim K is right -(make sure the weapon is clear and the mag is out) pull the slide to the rear about an inch or so and twist the barrel. I can't remember clockwise or counter-clockwise about a quarter turn.

When you ease the slide forward, the barrel should come off (forward) with it. If I had it in my hands I could do it for you in a matter of seconds, but I'm doing this with a memory of a pistol I had over 45 years ago. As I remember, there are lugs on the barrel that lock the barrel onto the frame. To re-assemble, just reverse this process. Turn the pistol frame upside down, ease the barrel and slide onto the rails on the frame and gently pull the slide to the rear to compress the mainspring. Rotate the barrel so the locking lugs engage the lug recesses on the frame, and then ease the slide forward.

If this doesn't work, please forgive me as this is the best my memory can do at the moment. A competant (maybe an older guy) gunsmith can show you how to do this in just a couple of minutes. Good luck - Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,379 Posts
Those pistols were given the generic name "Ruby" pistols when they were made for the French in WWI. Before and after that war they were sold on the world market. They were generally poorly made and of inferior materials although, as I said, G&A were among the better ones. There is a very small collector interest, mainly in trying to find out how many odd names and makers can be found. Value is negligible, usually in the $50 range if the gun is in good shape and functional, both uncommon characteristics.

Few dealers will take them on trade because they cannot offer any kind of warranty. Needless to say, no parts are available and gunsmiths won't work on them since nearly any repair would exceed the value of the gun.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the answers. It does come off to the front when barrel is removed. The hammer is having a problem cocking.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,000 Posts
I'm not clear by 'the hammer is not cocking'. I'd advise to strip it down as you have described that you have. Take out the barrel and remove the slide.

Look at the recess as best as you can around the hammer. You may have to remove the grips to see more of the internals around the hammer. My guess is that more than likely that area has collected a lot of dust and debris. If you get enough of that, the hammer action may become sluggish, and/or the sear notch on the hammer may be really dirty or even rusty. In that case, the hammer won't let the sear engage and the hammer won't lock back in the cocked position.

You don't sound like you have a bunch of experiance working on firearms, but an easy fix is to spray the dicken's out of that recess with WD40. Really blast it with the spray straw and flush out all that you can, then turn it upside down to drip dry the excess. I know a professional gunsmith would shudder at this suggestion, but it will get you back in buiseness. Good luck -
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,379 Posts
It is not unknown for hammer notches, sears or sear springs on those guns to fail completely. When that happens, the gun cannot be disassembled because the hammer won't stay cocked and the slide cannot be forced forward because of the hammer.

Jim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,702 Posts
Jim is correct. If the hammer cannot stay cocked the slide cannot be removed. Then the pistol must go to a gunsmith. Some people can fix that but others would rather not bother.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,379 Posts
Although the Spanish made a whole lot of those pistols, production was divided among a dozen or more companies, plus parts were often hand fitted. The result is that finding a hammer, a sear, or any other part that will "drop in" is likely a lost cause. Having parts made, at current gunsmith hourly rates, is not economically feasible, since the cost would be more than the gun is worth.

Jim
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top