The Firearms Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
So lets say you pick up all brass that you shoot ....but sometimes, unknowingly, you pick up brass that others have shot.

I know all my brass has been swaged but brass that others shoot is military crimped brass and that I also may pick up.

how do you mark your brass to show it has been swaged? permanent marker?

thx
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
If you don't mark the swaged cases then I assume you must closely inspect and separate all the pick up brass; right? For me, it is sometimes hard to tell if the case has a crimp or not.

I don't have much experience with crimped brass...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,290 Posts
MOST military brass, with crimped primers, has yellow primers.

MOST reloading primers are silver.

If I pick up a piece of WCC86 brass, or LC72 brass, with a silver primer, the pocket has already been done. Swaged or trimmed does not matter - it's been done.

Now, if you reload with Winchester, you use yellow primers, and that may be a problem. Also I bought a case of Federal 45s, FC96, and them damn things CAME with silver primers. Annoying.

So my FC96 45s have a black sharpie line running across the head. After tumbling, it has mostly gone away, and I draw it again before I prime 'em. Pain in the butt.

If I find military brass, I look at it. If it even vaguely looks like there's a crimp, I swage it. I'd rather waste the tame swaging a non-crimped pocket, than ruin a primer trying to seat over a crimp.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
28,080 Posts
I don't mark anything. I deprime before cleaning so it gets a once over after I knock the primer out and toss it into the cleaner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,588 Posts
I don't mark mine after they've been sorted, deprimed, and reamed/swaged.
But, my eyes are good enough yet that I can usually see a reamer chamfer on the primer pocket too. (I ream my military primer pockets). Swaged is a little harder to spot.

If I'm shooting at my home range, I'm usually the only one dumping brass there so I know what I took with and am picking up.
If I'm shooting at our local public range, I police up the area where I'll be dropping empties before I start shooting...that way I have less sorting to do afterwards.
If I'm just scrounging brass at the local range, I inspect all of it as I clean/sort it.

A permanent marker will rub off on the next trip through the tumbler, so it's not really permanent.


Otherwise, Alpo's suggestion to watch primer color is a good tip. And if any question on a piece, it doesn't hurt to throw it in the swage bucket and make another trip through your swaging die with it either.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top