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Hi Nicolle. Looks like a very much cut-down Enfield. Not worth a whole bunch as it is other than a conversation piece. Look at the front of the trigger guard and you can see where a sling-strap loop would have attached, so it was originally a much longer barrel rifle at one time. The markings on the lock plate are too faint for me to read - but I'm still guessing model of 1853 British Enfield.

Some of our English friends may be able to identify the "Unit Markings" on the top of the brass butt plate. I have no idea where your rifle was or it's individual history is, but .577 Enfield muskets were used widely by both the Federal (Union) and Confederate Armies. After the Civil War many of the former military muskets were shortened for gathering food for the cooking pots at home.
 

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I agree with Jim. My first impression when I looked at it was that perhaps the barrel had been replaced . The lock plate certainly looks like an 1853 Enfield. No surprise since you are in Canada and the standard issue there were usually British manufactured firearms.
 

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Fellas, it isn't an Enfield, 1853 or otherwise. Nichole can you take it outdoors in natural light and take pictures of both sides and good close ups of any markings on the lock plate, side plate if it has one, and of any proof marks that may be on the barrel. Perhaps we can figure out what it was before it got cut down. Also if you can, give us an approximate bore diameter.
I suspect it used to be an Austrian Lorenz rifled musket but I'll need those pictures to confirm or disprove my hunch.
 

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Fellas, it isn't an Enfield, 1853 or otherwise. Nichole can you take it outdoors in natural light and take pictures of both sides and good close ups of any markings on the lock plate, side plate if it has one, and of any proof marks that may be on the barrel. Perhaps we can figure out what it was before it got cut down. Also if you can, give us an approximate bore diameter.
I suspect it used to be an Austrian Lorenz rifled musket but I'll need those pictures to confirm or disprove my hunch.
The butt plate and hammer say it's not a Lorenz.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hi Nicolle. Looks like a very much cut-down Enfield. Not worth a whole bunch as it is other than a conversation piece. Look at the front of the trigger guard and you can see where a sling-strap loop would have attached, so it was originally a much longer barrel rifle at one time. The markings on the lock plate are too faint for me to read - but I'm still guessing model of 1853 British Enfield.

Some of our English friends may be able to identify the "Unit Markings" on the top of the brass butt plate. I have no idea where your rifle was or it's individual history is, but .577 Enfield muskets were used widely by both the Federal (Union) and Confederate Armies. After the Civil War many of the former military muskets were shortened for gathering food for the cooking pots at home.
Thank you..i just wanted any info i could get on it..going to pass it along to my son.. it was used by my great grand father but my nanny didnt have any history that she could remember.
 

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1809/31. I just knew it wasn't a Lorenz. You came up with Potsdam. I just looked up pics and verified it.
Thank you..i just wanted any info i could get on it..going to pass it along to my son.. it was used by my great grand father but my nanny didnt have any history that she could remember.
Thank you..i just wanted any info i could get on it..going to pass it along to my son.. it was used by my great grand father but my nanny didnt have any history that she could remember.
Thank you..i just wanted any info i could get on it..going to pass it along to my son.. it was used by my great grand father but my nanny didnt have any history that she could remember.
Here are more pics ..sorry it took so long..been a crazy week.
 

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It's definitely a Potzdam model 1809/31 converted from flint to percussion by the Prussians between 1831 and 1839. After Prussia adopted the Dreyes needle gun these muskets were sold as surplus and many of them ended up being used in the American Civil War. Yours was converted a second time into a hunting gun by cutting the stock, shortening the barrel and adding a front sight and ramrod thimble to the barrel.
 
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