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That's not the way I was taught to apply veneer when I worked in a piano and organ cabinet shop many years ago.

Wood glue? We always used contact cement applied to both surfaces. The way you are doing it with wood glue is not getting a real good and long lasting bond with the veneer. With contact cement for veneer there is never a problem with it sticking at the edges. If you want to use the wood glue as you are I would suggest you apply it to the veneer also rather than depending on it to transfer and bond from the spray on water on dried wood glue.

I know you say you never had a problem, but...oh well, I hope it doesn't start coming loose.

And one more thing, Clogs? Really? :D;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
When you are working with figured veneer like the stuff I was, it is not flat, very wavy and uneven like say Mahogany, Maple or even unfigured Walnut. I do use it for laminate, which is very flat, and smooth. I have never used contact cemen for veneer, but it seem as though the unforgiving nature of it would make adhearing wavy veneer a bit difficult. I'll give the contact cement a try and see how it works for me. Just thought I'd give another option. Like I said, I have several projects that are at leat 10 or more years old(probably a lot older than that. I'm 60 and I've doing woodworking and carpentry off and on since I was about 15) that are still holding up fine. As for the clogs, next time I do a woodworking video in my nasty a$$ed shop, I'll put on my dress shoes. Wife might get mad at me though.

Donnie D
 

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Well I know there's always more than one way to do something, just sharing what I learned from an old cabinet maker way back in the '70's. I restore many old clocks with bad veneer on the cases and always use contact cement. It always sticks real well and doesn't lift years later. If what you are doing works don't change, just saying what I was taught and still do today.

But the Clogs...well there's just no excuse for that. ;)
 

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I've used that method myself, but prefer hide glue and either a veneer hammer for small pieces or a vacuum press for larger areas.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
GH.... You're right, them clogs are pretty scaggy lookin. :eek:

GG.... Have never used a vacume press. Would love to have one. Pretty pricy though. :D

Donnie D
 

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GG.... Have never used a vacume press. Would love to have one. Pretty pricy though. :D

Donnie D
Buying a commercial press, yes. But you can make your own with parts from an old frig or window A/C unit if the compressor and motor still work. Bags can be a bit pricey, but last a long time. Check this out for how-to as well as other veneering tips and supplies: http://www.joewoodworker.com/veneering/welcome.htm
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for the link. I'll check it out.
Donnie D
 

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I've used that method myself, but prefer hide glue and either a veneer hammer for small pieces or a vacuum press for larger areas.
Yup. Hide glue is the method I learned for doing wood veneer resto work. That's what they used back when the stuff I like working with was built.
Contact cement works too though...a modern tool for the same job. I don't mind using contact cement for laminates like Formica, but wood-on-wood I prefer glue. Probably for the same reason that I still prefer hand tools over power tools for some jobs...I'm quirky. :rolleyes:

Never been around a vacuum press though. Sounds like a neat setup (oh oh...a power tool. :) )
 
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