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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After 7 weeks of hanging in the garage attic, I took the sausages down and am getting ready to vacuum seal them for the freezer. This was a good batch, and it lost over 56% of its weight while hanging. Very nice flavor. Here are the before and after pics from January 5th until today. This an all pork recipe.
 

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Joe, that looks really good! What do I have to do to get some of it?
 

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Ahh as someone who has had his share of homemade Soupies those look tremendous! Good Job. How about two for the TFF giveaways LOL. I know how valuable they are!!
 

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Those look fantastic. How about a recipe and what you stuffed them in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
By popular demand....
Scale down the recipe as needed. I made 15# of trimmed butts, and seasoned accordingly. Remember your finished weight will be approximately half of the hanging weight, and this sausage goes a long way. The 1/4t of Prague powder (aka, pink salt) is fine for smaller batches. It won't hurt anything. You can probably get some from your local sausage making butcher for free like I did.


Soppresatta Recipe 50 Lb.

50 lb of 90/10 coarse ground pork butts ( trim excess fat and silver skin)
3 oz whole pepper corns
3 oz salt per 10 lb meat
¼ tsp salt peter ( Prague powder) per 50lb meat
garlic to taste
½ to 1 full carafe white or red wine to taste
paprika to taste
can add other spices should you desire

Mix coarse ground meat and ingredients until sticky. Place in hog middles casings double tie with string to ends, make loop on both ends. Hang in cool area ( 38-40 degrees) with air circulation for 30-60 days. Cure should be done when approximately 1/3 of weight has diminished, but some like it drier and let it hang until 50% loss has been achieved. Vacuum seal and put in freezer. Slice very thin and serve with cheese assortment, hard Lavash crackers or fresh Italian bread with a seasoned EVOO on the side.

Here's a picture of the Lavash crackers I make to serve with the sausage. They are made with equal amounts of white, wheat & rye flour, and have savory toppings on them. Check the link for the recipe by Peter Reinhart, the bread guru. Mine are an adaptation from his book, The Bread Baker's Apprentice, where I learned most of my bread baking knowledge.

 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Those look fantastic. How about a recipe and what you stuffed them in.
This sausage is stuffed in hog middles, which are hard to find. Everyone stocks smalls for Italian sausage and other sausages, but mids are not popular and you may have to order them from your local butcher like I did. I got 70' (one bundle) and it cost me $20...very expensive, but I have enough for 2-3 more 15# batches.

We are at the end of the season for hanging with the days starting to push 50F in NE Ohio. If you live in a colder state than Ohio, you could still make and hang these without much problem, but you'll need 45 days to get the results I achieved. I had these in the attic of my garage, which has a ventilated ridge vent and lanced soffit at the eves to give good air flow. It stays in the 35-45F range most of the winter.
 

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Thanks Joe. Definately getting to warm in my area to do this now.
 

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just curious, what actually cures them? or do you use a product like Tender Quick?
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
just curious, what actually cures them? or do you use a product like Tender Quick?
Salt is the curing/preserving agent in my recipe. Tender Quick is salt with other agents to aid in preservation, color and flavor enhancement, and would be fine to use for this recipe. Keep in mind, Tender Quick is NOT a meat tenderizer. Do not deviate from the amount of salt called for in any dry cured sausage recipe. Too little and the meat will not cure properly, and too much will make a salty sausage that nobody will want to eat.

I use only what is listed above in the recipe. Some folks like a spicy sausage and add crushed red pepper or garlic or fennel seed (or all the above) to the mix, but then you're starting to cross the recipe line from a Sopressata from the Tuscany region to a hot Calabrese style sausage from the South if Italy. Each region has its favored recipe, and you can find recipes for all of them online. You can pretty much add whatever spices or herbs that you like to sausage to satisfy your particular palette, as long as you adhere to the principles of dry curing.

The Prague powder prevents bad bacteria from attacking the sausage while it slowly dries from the outside in.
 

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Salt is the curing/preserving agent in my recipe. Tender Quick is salt with other agents to aid in preservation, color and flavor enhancement, and would be fine to use for this recipe. Keep in mind, Tender Quick is NOT a meat tenderizer. Do not deviate from the amount of salt called for in any dry cured sausage recipe. Too little and the meat will not cure properly, and too much will make a salty sausage that nobody will want to eat.

I use only what is listed above in the recipe. Some folks like a spicy sausage and add crushed red pepper or garlic or fennel seed (or all the above) to the mix, but then you're starting to cross the recipe line from a Sopressata from the Tuscany region to a hot Calabrese style sausage from the South if Italy. Each region has its favored recipe, and you can find recipes for all of them online. You can pretty much add whatever spices or herbs that you like to sausage to satisfy your particular palette, as long as you adhere to the principles of dry curing.

The Prague powder prevents bad bacteria from attacking the sausage while it slowly dries from the outside in.
thanks Joe

I have made several batches of fresh smoked sausage, where I cold smoke it for hours at low temps so i have to be careful and cure it to prevent bacteria during the smoking process. After that I freeze it.

I have been wanting to make a some peperoni style sausauge but have not had the time to look into it
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Joe why are u not selling that stuff i don't believe u made that WOW. do u make porketta
Beth, I'm not selling my sausages for the same reason I don't sell my breads...it's my hobby, not my job, and I don't want another job. If I did this for profit I would starve, because people would not pay what its worth. I can't make my stuff in sufficient volume to be price competitive with the stores, nor do I want to. I cook & bake bread as a form of relaxation, and because I enjoy feeding my family and friends. If I don't feel like being in the kitchen we go out to eat, and nobody is disappointed that their order hasn't been delivered.

As for the porketta, my family doesn't care for the fennel & dill that is in the traditional porketta recipe. i make pork roast frequently, but it's a traditional recipe with customary spices & herbs. I also roast pork to 190F and make pulled pork a lot.





 
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