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I have been using centerfire designs for months. But I don’t have any idea about rimfires Recently I came to know that when we do dry fire in a rimfire rifles it ill affect the gun’s performance because of its brittle firing pins. If we do so how many rounds of dryfire will it take to affect the gun. Or is there any Gun Customization tricks to make it more reliable
 

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You never dry fire a rim fire. As is with the name, the firing pin hits the rim of the cartridge. On many/most rimfires, if the cartridge is not there to absorb the blow of the firing pin, it batters either the rear of the cylinder or the edge of the chamber cut on a bolt or semi. It has nothing to do with brittle firing pins unless some specific firearms have that problem. In 60+ years of playing with firearms of all kinds I've never heard that.
 

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Some you can, some you can't. Some like the Ruger MK I - MK III you have to to disassemble/reassemble. Most older guns can't be safely dry fired without eventually causing damage. Some newer ones can't be safely dry fired. The Browning 1911 22 is one you can't. I have never seen a firing pin broken from dry firing. I have seen them battered and the edge of the chambers on those were buggered up too.
 

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I use a drywall plastic screw insert in my rifle if I NEED to dry fire.
Instantly brought back a memory. My career was in the electrical industry and as a youngster I had a manager that would shoot us with wire nuts he put in a paintball gun. YOWZA!
Like you've heard, a few you can and most you can't. Since I'm too lazy to figure out which is which I just never dry fire any of my 22's.
 

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I will gladly correct what I said. 99.9% of my experience with rimfires is with firearms from the 50's, maybe 60's, and earlier. That's where I was coming from and never gave a thought to anything newer than that. To be honest I have to plead ignorance about anything newer....which is glaringly obvious....
 

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Or is there any Gun Customization tricks to make it more reliable
The simplest precaution to take is to use a "snap cap" or some other soft plastic fake round such as a plastic hollow-wall anchor. Depending on the type of action, this can be easy or not easy. A bolt action is quite easy; bolt is cocked upon raising the handle, and you just put it back down, not ejecting the dummy round.
 

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I try never to dry fire my 22lr guns. On my bolt action, this is hard to do as the last round is hard to count. Did you only load 9? Was that 10 or 9? Ruger says it's ok to dry fire but I try no to do it.
 

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If you dry fire any firearm long enough , you will cause damage.
I have fixed Winchester 94s ( yes, the old 30-30 ) that were used in theater due to dry firing. The bolt was so deformed that the action could bearly close. The bolt face had a reverse peen from dry firing of about 40 thou. There was no way you could load a cartridge and close the action.
 

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The Colt Woodsman is made to be dry-fired, in case anyone is interested. This is why the slide doesn't lock back when it's empty.
 
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Most older rimfires are not safe to dry fire. A lot of newer ones are safe to dry fire. As an example, I just purchased a Taurus TX22 pistol and it says in the owner's manual that it is safe to dry fire. Another example is Ruger. Their MK4 line requires you to dry fire to disassemble the weapon.

Moral of the story, check your owner's manual to find out if you can safely dry fire or not.
 

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The Colt Woodsman is made to be dry-fired, in case anyone is interested. This is why the slide doesn't lock back when it's empty.
Anschutz does NOT recommend dry firing it will cause damage unless you have installed the special firing pin.
Colt agrees with them.
Without the special firing pin you will cause damage if you do it often.
ALL firing pins are designed to hit the primer not just slaming the bolt face or receiver.
In most cases the pin will hit the bolt if there is round in the chamber and on .22s they can hit the the outside of the chamber. In the case of the woodsman it has a stop pin that stops the firing pin before it hits the cutout in the receiver BUT with enough dry firing you will damage the hold back pin. AND the firing pin.
Snap caps is the answer (Or something like that).
Please believe me it is NOT a good idea to dry fire ANY GUN whether the maker says it's ok or not. I have fixed enough guns that have been dry firered to know.
Let me try to explain.
On a center fire your pin will either hit the bolt to stop or collapse the spring beyond were it is suppose to go (making the spring wear out to soon).
On 22s they will hit the cutout in the receiver or hit the cross pin that keeps it from hitting the cutout and it will eventually bend the cross pin and also dent the cutout in the firing pin that is there for the cross pin.
 

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The only time I dry fire a .22 is when I loose track of rounds in magazine....Ruger may say it's ok,but I would'nt do it.

I will gladly correct what I said. 99.9% of my experience with rimfires is with firearms from the 50's, maybe 60's, and earlier. That's where I was coming from and never gave a thought to anything newer than that. To be honest I have to plead ignorance about anything newer....which is glaringly obvious....
You're correct....Had a 1963 .22,dry fired constantly-finally dug up .50 for box of .22-NONE would fire-needed a new firing pin.
 

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The Colt Woodsman is made to be dry-fired, in case anyone is interested. This is why the slide doesn't lock back when it's empty.
I disagree with that about the Woodsman. An old friend ruined a Woodsman dry firing it. The firing pin peened the breach face of the barrel to the point that were the cartridge would not chamber.
 

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Some modern rim fire can be dry fired if the owners manual claim you can like the Ruger SR22. If you do not have the owners manual, you mire find online at the manufacture's website. If not, call them and ask.
As for dry firing center fire, I always use a snap cap dry fire cartridge such as these. There are a couple of companies that make them.
238665
 

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The other solution is to remove the firing pin. some actions are fairly easy to do, and require no tools. Some actions require the removal of a retaining pin, but if you're handy, it's not too hard to do.
 
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