The Firearms Forum banner
21 - 40 of 43 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,279 Posts
I had to send in the predecessor to the S&W Mod. 17 because the back of the cylinder was so peened sometimes it wouldn't fire and extraction was always......snug. It wasn't tight but you could see where the peening was dragging on the cases. They put a new cylinder in it. I haven't bought a firearm with an owners manual in.....a very long time.
 

·
Banned
What guns?
Joined
·
686 Posts
It's interesting to hear conflicting views on the Woodsman. You have to dry fire it to disassemble it for cleaning. I read some stuff by someone claiming to be an authority, and I thought he had to know what he was talking about. Sorry if the information was wrong.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,219 Posts
It's interesting to hear conflicting views on the Woodsman. You have to dry fire it to disassemble it for cleaning. I read some stuff by someone claiming to be an authority, and I thought he had to know what he was talking about. Sorry if the information was wrong.
Yes you do have to dry fire it to disassemble it but you only do that a few times not over and over again. And when I do that I use a snap cap.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
18,279 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
819 Posts
The first gun I ever handled was my Dad's Mossberg Mod. 35 bolt action .22 when I was about 8 years old. That was according to my math 68 years ago. I remember well my Dad saying over and over, "Never pull the trigger without a round in the chamber". This advice has stuck with me ever since. I cringe when I do have to dry fire one of my guns when it's necessary to take the gun apart to clean it.
I have never had a broken firing pin though. Maybe it's time to invest in some snap caps.
Lynn
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,059 Posts
"Ideally" the firing pin should stop short of the chamber edge, but not all rimfires are created equal. The ones that are, usually don't suffer a lot of dry firing without wearing down what stops the firing pin from hitting it. This is why they make chamber irons.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
195 Posts
And it's not just something you shouldn't do because damage "might" happen, it will. One the other hand, I once got my hands on a Winchester 75 at a really good price because it would not eject a shell. You had the use a cleaning rod to push the spent casing out. The problem is, it had been dry fired so many times the pin had deformed the back of the chamber and made a tiny little bulge into the chamber that the casing expanded around and held with a death grip. It took a lot of flanging to smooth it out, but it was worth it. And yes, there is a special tool for this problem because people cause dry fire damage all the time.

I was able to swag a Winchester 75 that was badly peened. Got lucky and a good rifle for my trouble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,342 Posts
This may sound like a stupid question but why can't someone load a spent shell into the chamber and fire the gun before disassembly if that's necessary?
I collect up the fired cases and do that. Dry firing is good practice when actual firing is not possible. I will dry fire twice in the same spot then rotate the case to a new spot. This using of spent cases to dry fire annoys a good friend of mine because he wants my spent 22LR case to rework into .224 centerfire bullets. He has Cordon dies to do it. I have seen some of his reworked cases and he needs way more practice at it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Most older rimfires are not safe to dry fire. A lot of newer ones are safe to dry fire. As an example, I just purchased a Taurus TX22 pistol and it says in the owner's manual that it is safe to dry fire. Another example is Ruger. Their MK4 line requires you to dry fire to disassemble the weapon.

Moral of the story, check your owner's manual to find out if you can safely dry fire or not.
Well, I own a TX22 Pistol here in Brazil, and in my manual it says (in English, and Portuguese) that:

"Continuously triggering the trigger mechanism without
ammunition can damage your gun."

So we have this: the TAURUS Pistol Designer said you can, your USA manual says you can, but my BRAZILIAN manual says it can damage the gun.

Well, I own a TX22 Pistol here in Brazil, and in my manual it says (in English, and Portuguese) that:

"Continuously triggering the trigger mechanism without
ammunition can damage your gun."

So we have this: the TAURUS Pistol Designer said you can, your USA manual says you can, but my BRAZILIAN manual says it can damage the gun.
It is written on Page 43 of the TAURUS TX22 manual: "Continuously triggering the trigger mechanism without ammunition can damage your gun."

You can download my manual on the link below:

 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
10,059 Posts
Usually if there isn't a way to close a bolt with the trigger pulled to de-cock it. That's why they make snap caps, and dry wall anchors. ;) Most dry firing occurs on repeaters and autos that don't have a last shot hold open. Center fires aren't as critical as rimfires. Majority of newer rimfire as I posted above, are set to have a couple of thousandths clearance beteen the tip of the firing pin, and the edge of the chamber. That is usually regulated by a firing pin stop. If repeated dry firing hammers the stop enough, the pin makes contact and peens the edge of the chamber. Then you have to repair the cause, and then use a chamber iron to straighten out the chamber.
 
21 - 40 of 43 Posts
Top