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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone I’m looking at this Luger. Kinda a trade with a guy I know. But I have no knowledge of this weapon and from what I gather you can really get in upside down on one fast. Definitely if you don’t know what to look for. So I’m just asking for advise and thoughts on value and history of the pistol. It is in 30 Luger and all the serial numbers match except on the mag. At least as far as I can see. I do know what he paid for it at a local shop. But that means not much to me if the value is not there.
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You've got money there if all your SYMBOLS are in the right place have you checked on the inside of the slide down where you pull the hammer back do your research what's the date
 

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More guessing here than anything else, but your Luger seems to be one of the 'after War' Lugers produced for the commercial (civilian) market. Two reasons why I say this are the chambering - .30 Luger - and that there is no date stamp on the top of the receiver bridge. Looks like a very old re-blue. The .30 Luger was never meant for issue to the German military - just for civilian and export sales.

The .30 Luger is a great caliber. It delivers high velocity. Commercial ammunition may be hard to find - even harder to find these days of "Dopey". Reloading dies and bullets are available, as well as brass cartridge cases. The bullets are the same as used for the 7.62 Tokarov (about 93 grain .3085 diameter). Sierra Bullets makes them in a soft point version.

If this is your first Luger - and if you intended to use it - just a word of caution: These pistols are fabulous shooters with a great natural point of aim, but there is a serious flaw. These are striker fired pistols, and very little keeps them from firing. They are not as safe to carry loaded as are modern striker fired designs. I recommend that you NEVER carry it with a round in the chamber - not even with the safety engaged. Only load it when you are ready to fire it.

Can't help with current values. With the name "Luger" attached people sometimes go crazy with prices whether justified or not..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for you input. This would be my first Luger. I would probably carry it to the trail gun on horseback to shoot snakes and stuff I have different weapons for my concealed carry. It’s just a neat gun and wouldn’t mind owning it and shooting it. Thanks for the advice on how it’s designed to fire. From what I was told it is a civilian pistol like you stated. Definitely cringed on the way the pistol was cleaned at some point in it’s life looks like somebody tried to clean it very aggressively and removed a lot of the bluing. Nonetheless it looks like a decent shooter I just want to make sure that I don’t lose my butt too bad on the deal.I just heard horror stories that someone thinks we’re getting some amazing deal and then it turns out that it’s a bunch of parts scab together and it’s not worth shit
 

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Looks to me like it might be a 1920 Commercial model. I don't see any military proof marks on it and if that proof mark on the left side near the front of the frame is a Crown over an "N", that is the German commercial proof mark. The extractor should be marked GELADEN and the wood base on the magazine will be unmarked (no SN). I have no idea of the value and will not make a guess, the book that this information came from is The Luger Handbook by Aarron Davis, copyright 1997.
 

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That looks like a very nice piece! I happen to know where a vintage box of .30 Luger is sitting on a LGS shelf. At least it was last week!!
 
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