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Discussion Starter #1
I have been doing some research comparing fast burn to slow burning powders? What does everyone think of them, and what do you use them in?
 

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Kindofa broad question with a lot of avenues to travel. How bout we narrow it down a bit. Are we talking pistol, magnum pistol, rifle, magnum rifle or everything in general?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Kindofa broad question with a lot of avenues to travel. How bout we narrow it down a bit. Are we talking pistol, magnum pistol, rifle, magnum rifle or everything in general?
I may be opening a can of worms here, lol. What I am probable looking for is when to change between the two? Right now I am loading mostly, .45, 9 mm and 38 special. Would I be able to use the two powders in these, or just the magnum loads?
 

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this is an easy question to answer. Use whats listed in your reloading manuals under the cartridges youre reloading. Study your manuals and make a list of powders that cover as many of the rounds you intend to load.

Judging by your list, Id look at Unique and Titegroup.
 

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I have never given much thought to burn rate for pistols.

I like slow burning powders for rifle use with long barrels.

I like fast burning powders for rifles with short bbls.
 

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this is an easy question to answer. Use whats listed in your reloading manuals under the cartridges youre reloading. Study your manuals and make a list of powders that cover as many of the rounds you intend to load.

Judging by your list, Id look at Unique and Titegroup.
I'll give a thumbs up to Josh's list and add WW231 (HP38) to the list as another good candidate.

Like others have posted, I don't usually prefer faster or slower when it comes to handgun cartridges. I usually try to stick with something middle of the road and useable in multiple calibers.
With short barrels you might want to go with a faster powder to get more of the charge burned before it exits the muzzle. (I do know that full-power 158gr .357Magnum loads using AA#9 makes for an awesome muzzle flash out of a 2.5" barrel! :D)
 

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I've been reloading .45 and 9mm with Bullseye. Fast burning and at $17 per pound cheaper than some of the other powders I could be using.
 

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clays and even clays universal are amazing powders, they cover most of the pistol rounds I load plus shotgun. fast though, don't overcharge!

I also use a lot of titegroup for those calibers but it too is very fast and not very forgiving.

now Hodgon's Longshot, that stuff is just great!! if you want to make some boomers, use that stuff, it's a longtime favorite for .357 and 12g hunting rounds.

Unique is an oldie but goodie as said
 

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I'm new to reloading, I've been in it for no more than say 6 months. I did not know of a burn rate when I first started. But I found out after reading the post people put up that what I started out using and still using is fast burning. I use H-322 or my AR and Titegroup and just got some universal for my 9mm. I have WSF too. I like Titegroup the best so far.
 

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For Pistol rounds:

A fast burning powder like W231 (HP38) can be a universal powder for most cartridges to give normal pressures.

Then there are the slightly slower powders like Unique which can be used for full power loads in most cartridges.

For magnum cartridges for full power you have to use the slow burning Pistol powders. Those are the W296, AA#9, H110, 2400, IMR4227. They generate higher pressures. But these same magnum cartridges can be loaded with the more universal fast powders like W231 but at lower pressures and velocities.

BUT.... Do not make up your own loads. ONLY use loads in reloading manuals. DO NOT use rifle powders in pistol cartridges (they are even slower burning than pistol magnum powders and will generate excessive pressures). Again, only use load data from reloading manuals. Don't use your buddy's load or Internet loads from others.

The pressure generated inside cartridges start in the 10,000 psi range and can go up to over 60,000 psi. If unconfined or excessive those pressures can do serious injury to guns and people. BE SAFE.

LDBennett
 

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Discussion Starter #12
This is all great info. Right now I am using mostly Alliant powder, and I always go by what the books call for.
 

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"Fast and Slow" burn rates are relative. In a .38 Special, Bullseye is fast and Blue Dot is slow, in a .44 Magnum Bullseye ie really fast and H110 is slow. I don't reload many rifle rounds so I don't have an example for them but the powders I use in my .223 that would be considered slow, would be considered fast in my .30-06.

I understand curosity, and wanting to know more about loading components, but too much info with too little knowledge can be dangerous, especially with reloading. I've been reloading for about 30 years and I still use data from my reloading manuals...
 

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mikld:

It makes no difference how long you been reloading. It is unsafe to reload without following reloading manuals.

Some think the lawyers force the reloading levels down but the facts are that pressure test modified by making sure that, no matter who makes the gun, the load will be safe for it. When you deviate from that data you risk harm to yourself and your gun, and even shooters and watchers in the area.

This advice is not for you but to make others aware that even us seasoned reloaders still follow the manuals and for good reason. I have been regularly reloading for about the same time as you but was introduced to reloading over 50 years ago. SAFETY FIRST.

LDBennett
 

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I'll give a thumbs up to Josh's list and add WW231 (HP38) to the list as another good candidate.

Like others have posted, I don't usually prefer faster or slower when it comes to handgun cartridges. I usually try to stick with something middle of the road and useable in multiple calibers.
With short barrels you might want to go with a faster powder to get more of the charge burned before it exits the muzzle. (I do know that full-power 158gr .357Magnum loads using AA#9 makes for an awesome muzzle flash out of a 2.5" barrel! :D)
you should see what 11 grains of 2400 look like pushing an 85 gr SP out of a TT33 clone. Its big and visible in the middle of the day. Prolly have you seein 'purple barneys' after just a couple shots in low light.
 

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I believe the process involves having the cartridge case full of powder. This is the best
for pressure and velocity. The Speer #9 lists Bullseye as the fastest and Hodgdon H87O as the slowest. Every other named power is in between these two.
you need to use the powder that fills the case, with the corresponding bullet, bullet weight, pressures, and expected velocity.
Too little or too much power changes pressure dramaticly. Like your now known as "Six Finger Jack"..
Any reduced power loads"Squib" need a filler to keep the power charge near the primer. Otherwise pressure can rise to explosive levels.
Ambiant temperture affects pressure levels. A max load in the winter may work, that same load in the heat of summer has excessive pressure.
Your near max or max loads ARE FOR YOUR GUN ONLY.
Chamber size, headspace, lack of headspace all affect pressure.
YOU CANNOT TELL WHAT A POWDER IS BY LOOKING AT IT
NEVER MIX POWDER CONTAINERDS
DISPOSE OF UNKNOWN POWDER AS LAWN FERTILIZER
Otherwise post a pic of you known as "Six Figure Jack"
Have a Safe Day.
11.5 Herco and a 125JHP from a 6 inch Ruger give a HUGE flash too.
 

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Bt Doctur:

Modern reloading manuals recommend NOT using fillers of any kind even though years ago manuals suggest it.

If a load is published in a recognized reloading manual then it is safe to use in almost any gun that meets SAAMI specifications. But there are variable like different case capacities due to brass thickness variations (with military brass being the best example of thick case walls and reduced interior volume) that dictate a reloader start at the starting load and work the load up, watching for pressure signs and NEVER exceeding Max loads.

LDBennett
 

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Bt Doctur:

Modern reloading manuals recommend NOT using fillers of any kind even though years ago manuals suggest it.

If a load is published in a recognized reloading manual then it is safe to use in almost any gun that meets SAAMI specifications. But there are variable like different case capacities due to brass thickness variations (with military brass being the best example of thick case walls and reduced interior volume) that dictate a reloader start at the starting load and work the load up, watching for pressure signs and NEVER exceeding Max loads.

LDBennett
if wish to see what filler will do for u,, load (for example) .357 with bullseye,, put the cartridges in your gun start with your barrel pointed down,, raise it and fire across your croni,,now point the barrel up and lower it and fire across your croni,, ahhh why is there a difference ,,, and this affects acuracy as well,,, filler for consistant burning,keeps the powder against the primer,, and have never had any kind of problems,, in any handgun used,, been doing this ( and many of my friends) from plinking to competition,,, and one of the reasons i dont use bullseye either,, hard to tell if you have tooo much in the case,, prefer powders that fill at least half of the case volume,, MUCH easier to spot that double drop
 

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oldfartrr:

Yes, some powders are position sensitive BUT.....Modern reloading manuals recommend NOT using fillers of any kind even though years ago manuals suggested it.

That's just a fact. You, of course may do what ever you please.

LDBennett
 
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