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Some old pistoleros would wear their pistols butt-forwards, then grab them with the same side hand, twisting the gun as it clears leather. Seems weird, but it works.
 

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I play around with quick draw a bit just fun. I don't compete, so my rig is not modified like the pros use. It's a tooled drop leg holster with a matching cross draw for the second gun.
For me, I'm much faster with the "strong side" gun. This is because drawing, cocking, and aiming the gun is one fluid upward movement of the arm. Catching the hammer spur with the palm of the hand while drawing, all that's left is to catch the trigger once you level the gun.
With cross draw one needs to pull their arm to the side, and then sweep the gun to get on target. (unless you stand sideways with your left hand behind your back)

On a side note: Those "shot shells" are not intended to make it easier to hit the target. They are to prevent a bullet from hitting something unintended beyond the target. They are usually just 2f black powder, (still burning when it hits the balloon) or a small amount of ground walnut shell.
I practice with snap caps mostly. I would never attempt this with conventional bullets. Way too high a chance of hitting something you don't want to.
A buddy of mines brother, the were in the mountains, Walter decided to quick draw his .22 magnum.
the bullet went through his right leg above the knee and lodged in his right ankle.
Charley and his dad Tom had to carry the idiot out of the mountains, about 10 miles, this was in I think 1969 or so.
 
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As far as practice goes, it's NEVER with a loaded gun.
The "practice" is more of smooth draw, cocking hammer AS I come on target.
Muscle memory is the key.
Muscle memory builds speed.
I cowboy shoot 3-6 times a year. I TRY to practice my draw a minimum of weekly. Most times in front of a mirror. ( I just look so good )

It's easier to see what my hand and the gun are doing.

I still believe practice and muscle memory are important than how you carry.

What you carry will effect speed more.
With a hip carry, longer barrels must be raised higher to clear the holster.

Common sense, physics, magic, or beliefs;
Good discussion to create critical thinking and comparison.

I really like how cross draw rides and is easier to draw, when driving. Hip carry and seatbelts are not optimum.
Long barrels carry best in a shoulder holster, for me.
 

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A buddy of mines brother, the were in the mountains, Walter decided to quick draw his .22 magnum.
the bullet went through his right leg above the knee and lodged in his right ankle.
Charley and his dad Tom had to carry the idiot out of the mountains, about 10 miles, this was in I think 1969 or so.
That is part of why I don't use "live" ammunition.
 

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As far as practice goes, it's NEVER with a loaded gun.
The "practice" is more of smooth draw, cocking hammer AS I come on target.
Muscle memory is the key.
Muscle memory builds speed.
I cowboy shoot 3-6 times a year. I TRY to practice my draw a minimum of weekly. Most times in front of a mirror. ( I just look so good )

It's easier to see what my hand and the gun are doing.

I still believe practice and muscle memory are important than how you carry.

What you carry will effect speed more.
With a hip carry, longer barrels must be raised higher to clear the holster.

Common sense, physics, magic, or beliefs;
Good discussion to create critical thinking and comparison.

I really like how cross draw rides and is easier to draw, when driving. Hip carry and seatbelts are not optimum.
Long barrels carry best in a shoulder holster, for me.
Pictures or it never happened.
 

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Ok I know this post was from august and I can honestly say i dont know much about the world of quick draw. Or what exactly cross draw is but i had to experiment. to I took my .22 revolver (EMPTY) and plopped it in its holster and did some test draws. Position #1 on my right hip Position #2 In front basically over my left pocket, kinda a belly draw. drawing and bringing to shoulder height. I can draw smoother and faster with the belly draw. drawing right handed with it holstered on my left hip was only slightly slower then the belly draw and still faster then Position #1. This could be do to the extensive nerve damage in my right arm and the longer draw being more comfortable.
 

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He doesn't let you see the ammo, when he shoots balloons, he uses shot shells, no missing.
Back when I was a kid I watched a fast draw demonstration at the State Fair, they never missed the balloons and they weren't using shot shells, they were using bullets made from paraffin wax. The wax bullets could pop the balloons but they couldn't penetrate the plexiglass sheet behind the balloons. You couldn't shoot lead bullets safely in a venue like a State Fairgrounds. I know they were wax bullets because they showed them to us to show us that what they were doing was safe for us bystanders.
 

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He was also accurate. He did a video a long time ago of him breaking a balloon at 200 yds with a .45 colt single action. He did it twice. The barrel would have covered the target at that range with the elevation he would have had to do. That man practiced a lot, his fingers were always black from gunpowder.
You use the barrel itself as part of the front sight. The front sight never leaves the target. As for shootouts in the old west they rarely happened. The Hickok Tutt fight is one of the better known ones and Bill braced across his left arm to make the shot. Not exactly fast draw but cold nerves. Low slung(buscadero)holsters didn't exist. Holsters covered the cylinder and all but the tip of the hammer. In most cases it took both hands to make a draw. One to hold the holster down and another to pull the gun. Leg ties and drop loop buscadero holsters are a Hollyweird invention.
 

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As far as who won the fight mentioned in the OP, who drew first? The person who knows when he is going to start drawing will usually beat someone who has to react to the other person drawing. Cowboy Fast Draw uses wax bullets and strong-side holsters. CAS allows both strong-side and cross draw, but you are supposed to dance around a little with the cross draw to keep the muzzle pointed down range. Some shooting games do not allow cross draw or shoulder holsters for safety reasons. I carry a handgun whenever I am at the farm and almost always have it in a cross draw holster because it is more convenient and comfortable when riding a tractor or ATV. I can get it out plenty fast enough.

I would imagine if you tried fast draw with a cross draw that you would have to be careful not to shoot your weak-side arm if you twisted your body to present your side to the target.
 

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We were at Tombstone AZ a few years ago and they had a target range in town. They used Colt 45's SA and wax bullets. I think they just used the primer and wax bullet. No powder. You shot a target 6 feet away. I was surprised to see they were very accurate.
 
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The biggest problem I’ve seen is that too many people who practice quickdraw is they aren’t keeping the trigger finger off the pistol or revolver trigger as they are drawing from the holster. Safe handgun handling has to be practiced at all time. The trigger finger has to be laid along side of the firearm until it is high enough to address the target. There are hundreds of videos on YouTube of ADs at combat style competitions because someone thinks they’re going to shave a couple of tenths of a second off their shooting score. Those ADs only get them disqualified. Then there are the individuals that shot them selves. To me, these are the biggest fudds and the cynic in me laughs at their stupidity.
 

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At the end of the day, I'm not sure it'll boil down to one drawing style (crossdraw vs. hip) being faster than the other. It'll depend on who's doing the drawing. Even THEN, you eventually approach a level of skill where it's not a question of who's faster. It's a question of who's faster, THAT DAY. Anyway, that's the way it looks to me.
 

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Ive done fast draw live ammo competition, with autoloaders (usually 1911's) for many years, both openly worn and concealed. Without a timer, a target that registers hits and a 5 try average, you'll have no clue which is fastest for you. Te best concealment and the fastest CCW draws, from hands at sides is at the navel, with the rig canted like an FBI behind the hip rig, for best concealment and sit down comfort. Sub 1.0 second can be averaged, from under a T shirt, at 5 yds for 5 draws and chest hits. From a hand in pocket start, tho, .70 second can be averaged, with a good front pants pocket holster.
 
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