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You seem worried that you may have damaged your ears. One time out like that and it is possible - but not likely. Just make sure you either avoid indoor ranges or double up on protection in the future. My ears are toast. I ruptured an eardrum as a child (infection and it burst from pressure), way too many hours monitoring the radio transceiver/direction equipment while flying (so loud it was physically painful). 36+ years of close proximity with jet and turbine engines. I have hearing loss and constant ringing. Protect what you have, my friend. They only issue you one set of ears.
 

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Perfect hearing is highly over-rated. I miss most of what everyone is saying, which doesn't bother me as my wife answers most of the time anyway. Plus, I've gotten used to the nice music I hear 24-7 even if it's only one high note.
 

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I have a few pair of North Com-Fit ear plugs. They are soft like ear plug headphones and sort of twist and cam into your ear. There is a little tube on the line between both plugs you use to twist them in. Once in and with a decent high decibel rated set of ear muffs, I can't hardly hear a thing. I don't have much hearing left and this combo works for me.
 

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Hey guys,

So I went to the indoor range the first time a week ago. It was my first time going. I wore the provided muffs which were 3M Peltor X4As (-27db). I was shooting a .22 which was fine but the guy about 4 bays down was shooting what appeared to be a .308 Tavor with a 20" barrel. The concussion was brutal to say the least but since then I've been wondering if those muffs were not enough for that indoors. What do you guys think?
If concussion hurt your ears you would definitely know it. It would be painful. Hearing loss, as already stated, maybe but doubtful. Just don't do it again. Ear protection is inexpensive compared to remedies once hearing is lost. 60 years ago we didn't know, there's no excuse today since the knowledge is out there.

BTW, even on an outdoor range double pro' is worth doing at least once. It's freaky to have an almost silent gun and to hear ones joints creaking as one moves. IMO double protection is best done with amplified muffs turned all the way up so that range commands can be heard but damaging sound is eliminated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
If concussion hurt your ears you would definitely know it. It would be painful. Hearing loss, as already stated, maybe but doubtful. Just don't do it again. Ear protection is inexpensive compared to remedies once hearing is lost. 60 years ago we didn't know, there's no excuse today since the knowledge is out there.
My ears weren’t ‘hurt’ at all. No pain and no ringing immediately afterwards either. I held down my muffs for the most part while being about 4 bays apart. I definitely won’t be going back there again. Hopefully I don’t have any long lasting effects.
 

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When I was in the artillery I would find myself in the field from time to time with out ear plugs. It hurts and your ears will ring for a few days. I would end up sticking cigerette butts or chewing gum in my ears or what ever I could come up with. The concussion was so strong that the leaves on the ground behind the gun would shake and move. I lost some hearing I'm sure but I can still hear more than 35 yrs after. I was also the front man in a rock and roll band with drum and cymbles for about 12-15 yrs behind me. For years I couldnt sleep in the quite because of the deaf tone rigging in my ears but it has gone away and doesnt bother me any longer. Guess I lost some of those nerves or frequencies.

Wear regular ear plugs under your ear muffs. That will give you better protection when in closed spaces while shooting. Whenever you have ringing in your ears it means that you have lost some of your hearing and once it is lost you can not get it back. The ringing stops after some time in early stages but eventually will stay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
When I was in the artillery I would find myself in the field from time to time with out ear plugs. It hurts and your ears will ring for a few days. I would end up sticking cigerette butts or chewing gum in my ears or what ever I could come up with. The concussion was so strong that the leaves on the ground behind the gun would shake and move. I lost some hearing I'm sure but I can still hear more than 35 yrs after. I was also the front man in a rock and roll band with drum and cymbles for about 12-15 yrs behind me. For years I couldnt sleep in the quite because of the deaf tone rigging in my ears but it has gone away and doesnt bother me any longer. Guess I lost some of those nerves or frequencies.

Wear regular eye plugs under your ear muffs. That will give you better protection when in closed spaces while shooting. Whenever you have ringing in your ears it means that you have lost some of your hearing and once it is lost you can not get it back. The ringing stops after some time in early stages but eventually will stay.
That’s pretty scary man. I thought being indoors was rough but shooting artillery rounds with nothing in your ears is definitely something else. I learned my ‘lesson’ from this. I can’t go back but I damn well know better now.
 

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That’s pretty scary man. I thought being indoors was rough but shooting artillery rounds with nothing in your ears is definitely something else. I learned my ‘lesson’ from this. I can’t go back but I damn well know better now.
Its okay to go back just go with the correct hearing protection. Unless you cant go back for other reasons.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Its okay to go back just go with the correct hearing protection. Unless you cant go back for other reasons.
I know. I just got really scared of having permanent ringing or loss just from one session. I seem to be getting better day by day though. I have terrible anxiety so it wasn’t a good start. You guys have been really helpful though.
 

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That’s pretty scary man. I thought being indoors was rough but shooting artillery rounds with nothing in your ears is definitely something else.
I've heard having them land next to you is pretty loud too!:eek:
 

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It's not just long guns. I'm pretty sure my .454s, .500, and even the .44mags are not appreciated at the indoor range when others are present. Usually I try to go when it's an "off" time and there aren't others present.

-Ron
 

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If you go to a range and people have muzzle brakes---MOVE away.....when we have multiple people on my range-ALL muzzle brakes without forward diverters are told to move waaaaaaaaaaaaaay down the line,don't like it-go away.
Muzzle brakes, the bane of every shooter next to one. The only answer, is have one that is louder.

Being to the right side of someone shooting a AR-15/AR-10, or most any gas operated rifle is loud from the residual high pressure gas venting from the ejection port. When I worked for a AR-15/AR-10 upper manufacture tested with a sound pressure level (SPL) meter firing a AR-15 with a 20” barrel with a standard A2 flash hider and firing M193 ball 55 gr ammo. The SPL measurements taken between the right and laft side of the rifle from a three foot distance where the right side was 8-9 decibel louder. That is significant in that for every 1 decibel increase the sound pressure level increases three times. So the right side of a AR-15 is 2-2/3 to 3 times louder then the left side. So the leason to take from this is be on the left side of someone shooting a AR-15 as it will be not as loud, plus you will not have hot high velocity spent cartridge case flung at you.

It's not just long guns. I'm pretty sure my .454s, .500, and even the .44mags are not appreciated at the indoor range when others are present. Usually I try to go when it's an "off" time and there aren't others present.

-Ron
That’s mighty respectful of you.
 

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This is a little off subject, but still is somewhat relative to shooting outdoors especially if someone has a personal firearms range, but still has neighbors within ears shot. I saw a video on YouTube were this 20 something guy stacked and strapped sidewall to sidewall about six or seven used car tires laid on a table and with the opening pointed at his down range target extending the muzzle end of the rifle barrel in about six or so inches into the tires. When he shot the rifle, the tires act like a sound baffle with significantly muffling the muzzle blast as he did a without and with the baffle firing with the video camera/tripod set up I’m guessing about 15’-20’ away.
 

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Muzzle brakes, the bane of every shooter next to one. The only answer, is have one that is louder.

Being to the right side of someone shooting a AR-15/AR-10, or most any gas operated rifle is load from the residual high pressure gas venting from the ejection port. When I worked for a AR-15/AR-10 upper manufacture tested with a sound pressure level (SPL) meter firing a AR-15 with a 20” barrel with a standard A2 flash hider and firing M193 ball 55 gr ammo. The SPL measurements taken between the right and laft side of the rifle from a three foot distance where the right side was 8-9 decibel louder. That is significant in that fir every 1 decibel increase two times for every 3 decibels. So the right side of a AR-15 is 2-2/3 to 3 times louder then the left side. So the leason to take from this is be on the left side of someone shooting a AR-15 as it will be not as loud, plus you will not have hot high velocity spent cartridge case flung at you.
Our outside shooting benches are about 10' apart and every time a guy is on my left side with a AR i have to double my ear protection. And most times it's still not enough. The brass doesn't bother me, but my left ear feels the strain by the time i leave.
 

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This is a little off subject, but still is somewhat relative to shooting outdoors especially if someone has a personal firearms range, but still has neighbors within ears shot. I saw a video on YouTube were this 20 something guy stacked and strapped sidewall to sidewall about six or seven used car tires laid on a table and with the opening pointed at his down range target extending the muzzle end of the rifle barrel in about six or so inches into the tires. When he shot the rifle, the tires act like a sound baffle with significantly muffling the muzzle blast as he did a without and with the baffle firing with the video camera/tripod set up I’m guessing about 15’-20’ away.
Thats cool. Kind of like a privacy screen for your own private range.
 
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