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Discussion Starter #1
Darn thing felt like I was breaking in a new gun! Action stiff, hung on each reload, had to smack the op rod like old times....but no malfunctions. I suspect this is the first time this 1945 “rack queen” has been fired in a long time, possibly since it was proof fired after being back in the shop for it’s new sights right after the war...

No serious range time, more of a function test at a buddy’s house, and I didn’t know he was taking pics...but this was the first shot...

I still kinda suck at “awful hand...”😎
 

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Lookin' good, Brother!

Off Hand position shooting: Feet a little wider apart, non-shooting (your left) foot facing the target, left upper arm/elbow supported by your rib cage (might have to shift your left hip out more) and the right elbow a tad higher. Deep breath, let out half - aim and squeeze. If it doesn't feel 'right', start over. Don't hold too long on your target between shots. Rest your eyes and re-do your breath.

You say the action feels 'stiff'? A good wipe down with gun oil AND a little grease (rear of upper/top of bolt and bolt lugs), operating rod recess on right of receiver, op rod cut-out for bolt lug (just a smidgeon), bolt lug recess inside of receiver (just a trace of grease the length of the cut-out area where the bolt lugs ride) and a drop of oil to the magazine pins and hammer pin. I like to apply that grease with a Q Tip.

You do want to keep the very end of the operating rod clean and dry of any oil. There is one area under the barrel where the Op Rod contacts the barrel. I like to wipe a thin film of gun grease there, too. You need a little grease anywhere there is metal-to-metal contact. Not too much oil or grease (because it attracts carbon and grit).

You already know these things. Just sharing for a younger shooter who may not know.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Lookin' good, Brother!

Off Hand position shooting: Feet a little wider apart, non-shooting (your left) foot facing the target, left upper arm/elbow supported by your rib cage (might have to shift your left hip out more) and the right elbow a tad higher. Deep breath, let out half - aim and squeeze. If it doesn't feel 'right', start over. Don't hold too long on your target between shots. Rest your eyes and re-do your breath.

You say the action feels 'stiff'? A good wipe down with gun oil AND a little grease (rear of upper/top of bolt and bolt lugs), operating rod recess on right of receiver, op rod cut-out for bolt lug (just a smidgeon), bolt lug recess inside of receiver (just a trace of grease the length of the cut-out area where the bolt lugs ride) and a drop of oil to the magazine pins and hammer pin. I like to apply that grease with a Q Tip.

You do want to keep the very end of the operating rod clean and dry of any oil. There is one area under the barrel where the Op Rod contacts the barrel. I like to wipe a thin film of gun grease there, too. You need a little grease anywhere there is metal-to-metal contact. Not too much oil or grease (because it attracts carbon and grit).

You already know these things. Just sharing for a younger shooter who may not know.
Lol. It’s getting harder to contort myself into the “bone on bone” support position as I get older. I used to do it properly all the time 35 years ago and still couldn’t hold a group worth a crap at 100😉

We used to shoot DCM Service rifle matches 100-200-300 yds but all at 100 with the reduced targets simulating 200 and 300. I never could figure out why we had to “resight” and they allowed sighters when we changed targets but we did. It just seemed counterintuitive- it was the same range only smaller targets???

What I really never understood was why slings were not allowed off hand, when then is when you REALLY needed them🤨. I did ok sitting and prone, but since I already blew off hand by then I was lucky to even finish middle of the pack.

But it was fun, especially with 10-20 Garands on the line at the same time, I might have to start competing again...

But then again, it now might be a little more exciting assuming the positions during rapid fire stages than it was when I was in my 20s and 30s...😎
 

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When my shooting buddy died, I took it upon myself to sell off his shooting gear for his wife.
His BABY was a FULL CUSTOM M1A. Light weight custom made walnut stock and that thing kicked like a mule. Wife said why "don't you keep it for yourself"? Figured it needed to go before it broke something of mine. :oops:
Put it up for sale at the LGS. Told the guy that I wanted $1000.00 for it. WAY TOO MUCH he said?? Figured well worth that price for all the custom work that went into it.
Sold it the next day, for $1000.00, no questions asked. :cool: And no use me keeping it if I didn't plan to shoot it. ;)
 

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It's been 40 years since I fired in competition (Military Service Matches). We fired both the M14s and the M16A1s. The ranges for the '14s were (as I recall) 200, 300 and 400 yards, while our targets with the 16A1s was 100 and 200 yards with reduced targets. Ammunition for the matches for the 14s had to be M118 issued on-the-line and for the 16A1s it was standard M193 Ball issued on the firing line. No custom ammunition was allowed in any match I fired in.

Been so long I cannot clearly recall the sequence, but our relays were Off Hand (standing) Slow fire, Sitting (my least favorite), Standing to Prone - and finally Prone Slow Fire. I think Off Hand was 200 yards, Sitting was 300 yards and the Prone shooting was 400 yards. As I recall we had to do a magazine change during each relay.

I STILL have all of my gear - except my old Match Log Book.
 

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Been so long I cannot clearly recall the sequence, but our relays were Off Hand (standing) Slow fire, Sitting (my least favorite), Standing to Prone - and finally Prone Slow Fire. I think Off Hand was 200 yards, Sitting was 300 yards and the Prone shooting was 400 yards.
The routine at the Camp Smith Matches back in NY was 200 yds off hand (my favorite), 300yds sitting or kneeling - shooter's choice, and 600 yds prone.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yeah the original DCM Service Rifle match rules were written for use with the 1903, so all stages were 10 rds. Single loaded for slow fire, (10 rds/10 minutes) 2 clips for rapid. (10 rds/30-60seconds). When they switched to Garands you single loaded for slow, but loaded 2 in a clip (they make special clips but you could ‘cross’ two rounds and it would load to start) then when you fired the two and the clip ejected you just loaded a full 8 rounder to finish.

I seem to recall our matches were 50 rounds, but with 10 rds slow and 10 rds rapid, off hand, sitting and prone that would be 60🤔

I wonder if maybe we only shot 10 slowfire offhand?🤔

I remember for rapid both sitting and prone you had to start standing and assume the position when time was running so there was some awkward moments “assuming the position” trying to get situated quickly...😎
 

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I seem to recall our matches were 50 rounds, but with 10 rds slow and 10 rds rapid, off hand, sitting and prone that would be 60🤔
The DCM matches at Smith were 88 rounds; one clip of 8 for sighters and the rest for the 200, 300 & 600 yard courses, though I don't recall the breakdown of rounds per course.
 

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Darn thing felt like I was breaking in a new gun! Action stiff, hung on each reload, had to smack the op rod like old times....but no malfunctions. I suspect this is the first time this 1945 “rack queen” has been fired in a long time, possibly since it was proof fired after being back in the shop for it’s new sights right after the war...

No serious range time, more of a function test at a buddy’s house, and I didn’t know he was taking pics...but this was the first shot...

I still kinda suck at “awful hand...”😎
The Garands that live in our rifle rack.
240131
 

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Maybe it was 200, 300 and 600 yards. Been so long I just can't remember. I DO remember it was a lot of fun (and a LOT of work!). My last Match was out in California at Camp Roberts back in 1983 in the Governor's Match. One of the 8 guys on my Rifle Team didn't have an M-14, so I let him shoot my M1A (we fired in separate relays). I had to keep readjusting my sights when it was my turn on the line.

Son-Of-A-Gun! I ended up Number 11 out of 200 - and HE ended up Number 10! Jerry out shot me with MY rifle! I used to out score him pretty often, but that time he beat me. My rifle was worked over by a California Army National Guard Armorer and was pretty much Match Grade - except for the sights. They were issue grade, but that thing was one sweet shooter. Jerry was awarded a Match Grade M-14 for that match and all of the M118 ammo he wanted to shoot.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
At the club I shot they would allow unlimited sighters, since all ammo was issued by the club and was included in the $10 fee of COURSE it took many sighters, at each stage, especially when you were using a club Garand, lol. But it still amazed me we did have to add clicks when we went from “100” to “200,” and “200” to “300,” even though all targets were at 100, just proportionately smaller targets and smaller scoring rings simulating what the same target would look like at 200 and 300. I never figured it out. It still was only 100 yds! With a 6 o’clock hold, it should not have mattered (?) Same range, just smaller targets? Why did we add clicks? But I remember we all did...🤔

And is that a C or a D?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah, it was halftime, lol.

And I was reminded of one more “Garand Memory...”.

Getting my nose smacked by my thumb every shot😎. I need at least 1-2” more LOP on an M1...
 

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Gotta love the Garand . Have had mine about 10 years and every time I shoot or just wipe it down I get a rush thinking of my dad and uncles who carried one in WW2 and another uncle in Korea . It's the pride of my collection . Glad you got you one man .
 

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Discussion Starter #16
What’s funny is my Dad got a 6 month deferment after Pearl Harbor because the factory he worked at got a contract to stamp out machine gun triggers (probably m1917) so he went in late. Got sent to Fort Bragg where he trained with the 29th Division, and right when he was literally in line to board the ship in Wilmington for England in 1943 he got called out of line, because “his (false) teeth were ready!” The division sailed, Dad got put in a replacement unit, got “drafted” for a new towed artillery unit, spent the war stateside as a #4 on a 105mm, but by that time we had broken out of Normandy and no more towed units got sent, only Self Propelled....he always told us if he had good teeth we wouldn’t be here. The 29th landed at Omaha beach, his unit 2nd wave, many guys he trained with died.

But, when I got my first DCM Garand, I took it to show him and he said “What’s that?”😳

I was flabbergasted! Until he told me he trained with the Springfield, (to him, THAT was a GREAT rifle) and that’s what they were carrying when they were leaving for England, and then after that he carried a carbine ( to him, a POS that you couldn’t hit the side of a barn from the inside!)

I didn’t get it, until later. Turns out we didn’t have enough Garands for everybody until late 1944, yes, some troops carried 03s ashore at Normandy, probably Dad’s buddies, and there are pictures of US troops in Italy and in the CBI carrying Springfields (Standard models, not only A4 snipers!)in 1945! The Marines didn’t get any until 1943...

That was an eye opener for me...
 

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My Dad enlisted back when the 1903s were standard issue. The Army chose the M1 Garand (I think) in 1939, and the Marine Corps made them standard in 1943. That was why Remington kept up production of the 1903s after Springfield re-tooled for the Garand.

Polishooter - please use ONLY ammunition intended for your rifle. That means no commercial hunting ammunition or anything loaded with other than the old powders (WC 852 and IMR-4895). I've heard from enough people who have bought DCM Garands to also caution against any foreign made M2 type ammo. There is a lot of Greek and Korean ammo "made to M2 specifications" - but who knows what those are really loaded with? They aren't making any more original M1s.

I've read many recipes for loading for the Garand. As stated above, use ONLY WC 852 or IMR-4895. There was a "High Pressure Test Cartridge" that was loaded and acceptable for the M1 Garand that used IMR-4198 For Proof Testing ONLY, but that cartridge generated 67,500 PSI pressure and was meant only for pressure testing a rifle - not general use. You can modify your rifle to work with other powders - but again they aren't making any more originals.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Yeah Jim, don’t worry. Outside of MAYBE experimenting some day with cast bullets, (don’t worry, I’m still learning casting, by the time I get into gas checks I’ll be lucky I master loading for the .30-30 before I see the face of our Lord...😉) I know 2700 FPS is the sweet spot for the M1, if I can’t find any 4895 by then my 4064 loads will be somewhere around that...

If I experiment at all it’ll be with bullets...I know what it should do with 150 gr ball, I love spending time on a bench with a spotting scope learning a rifle and finding bullets/loads a rifle likes, and there are plenty of 150-175 gr boat tail match bullets to test 😎
 

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Discussion Starter #19
And it was 1936 when the M1 was adopted by the Army, but there was a bigger scandal which led to congressional investigations than with the M16 in ‘Nam😉. Between politicians trying to lobby for the Johnson Rifle and the tests, some run by the NRA, production was delayed, AND they did have issues with the original “gas trap” system, it wasn’t til after all the political crap was done and the “new” gas port system was introduced that full production got cranked up, in ‘39-40... Funny thing was some original gas trap Garands saw service in the Philippines, MacArthur sent a special report reporting how great they were even with little maintenance...but then he was Army Chief when the Garand was adopted in ‘36 so he was as “political” as anybody 😉
 
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