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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Wood Gun Rifle Firearm Trigger Air gun Antique tool Revolver Revolver Antique tool Wood I plan on delicately cleaning it up some and restoring it to as close to original as possible. Would like to shoot it.... some.

What I know about it is:
41 Sauer & Sohn Mauser 98k.
All numbers match save for the obvious missing parts. (Handguard, take down locking pin spring, cleaning rod, screw/bolt directly behind the trigger)
No duffle cut.
Will include bore pictures later. (Looks good to this admitted novice)

I'd appreciate any advice on.....
It's value in it's current condition.
Cleaning it.
Restoration.
Shooting it?
Post restoration potential value?
 

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Looks like you have the makings of a decent K98. You can knock some of the rust off using some bronze steel wool. It looks like quite a bit of the original blueing is gone, but light cleaning and oiling should even it out some. Best to break it down so you can separate the stock from the metal--you don't want to get oil on the wood, it will darken and weaken it. Dents (not broken fibres) can often be raised by carefully steaming them using a wet cloth and the tip of a hot iron (works best when wife is out shopping). Some of the missing parts can probably be found on one of the online auction sights. I have no clue as to the value, I'm sure others will chime in on that.
 

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Looks like you have the makings of a decent K98. You can knock some of the rust off using some bronze steel wool. It looks like quite a bit of the original blueing is gone, but light cleaning and oiling should even it out some. Best to break it down so you can separate the stock from the metal--you don't want to get oil on the wood, it will darken and weaken it. Dents (not broken fibres) can often be raised by carefully steaming them using a wet cloth and the tip of a hot iron (works best when wife is out shopping). Some of the missing parts can probably be found on one of the online auction sights. I have no clue as to the value, I'm sure others will chime in on that.
Thank you for the tips Buffalo!

Heading out for dinner, when I get back, I'll give you details on cleaning, and a place to find the missing parts.
Thank you in advance Trap!
 

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Parts: https://www.libertytreecollectors.com/productcart/pc/viewcategories.asp?idCategory=40
https://www.gunpartscorp.com/gun-manufacturer/mauser/rifles-mauser/98-2/parts-list-mau-98
Over in the R/S column under Maintenance, dis-assembly/re-assembly for the rifle and the bolt, and one for re-cocking the bolt:
http://web.archive.org/web/20100828113229/http://www.surplusrifle.com/mauser98k/index.asp
When it's apart, measure the length of the groove where the band spring fits in the stock. I believe yours take the 3 5/8ths milled spring.
As Buffalochip said above, bronze or copper wool, it'll take the rust off but not the blueing, ACE Hardware has it. Copper penny edge for the belligerent rust spots. Auto trans fluid works good to soak it in while you're doing that. When you think you got it, wipe it down, then hose it off with Brake Cleaner. The second it dries, anything you missed will light up neon orange. If it does, repeat as needed.
When you do have it all, coat every inch of the metal with CLP BreakFree (Walmart has it). It's a silicon based gun oil that will block moisture from feeding the rust again.
Your stock is a red laminate, and I wouldn't recommend refinishing, steaming dents, etc. It might look nicer, but takes a chunk out of value. While all the hardware is off the wood (don't mess with the stock disc!), take a piece of burlap soaked in Boiled Linseed Oil (BLO), and scrub it like you mean it, going with the grain. The second you're done scrubbing, wipe the stock dry. You aren't using it for a finish, you're using it as a solution to float the grime up out of the wood, and condition/seal it as you do.
Careful where you put the rags/paper towels, and the burlap that you wiped it off with until they dry. BLO can spontaneously combust as it dries.
Do the unfinished wood the same way. Set it some place warm for a day, and buff it out with a clean rag.
Get all that done, re-assemble with your new parts, and post some more pics, "then" I can give you a value.
Just thinking, with all the boxes of misc. Mauser parts I have laying around, I don't have a single one you need!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Parts: https://www.libertytreecollectors.com/productcart/pc/viewcategories.asp?idCategory=40
https://www.gunpartscorp.com/gun-manufacturer/mauser/rifles-mauser/98-2/parts-list-mau-98
Over in the R/S column under Maintenance, dis-assembly/re-assembly for the rifle and the bolt, and one for re-cocking the bolt:
http://web.archive.org/web/20100828113229/http://www.surplusrifle.com/mauser98k/index.asp
When it's apart, measure the length of the groove where the band spring fits in the stock. I believe yours take the 3 5/8ths milled spring.
As Buffalochip said above, bronze or copper wool, it'll take the rust off but not the blueing, ACE Hardware has it. Copper penny edge for the belligerent rust spots. Auto trans fluid works good to soak it in while you're doing that. When you think you got it, wipe it down, then hose it off with Brake Cleaner. The second it dries, anything you missed will light up neon orange. If it does, repeat as needed.
When you do have it all, coat every inch of the metal with CLP BreakFree (Walmart has it). It's a silicon based gun oil that will block moisture from feeding the rust again.
Your stock is a red laminate, and I wouldn't recommend refinishing, steaming dents, etc. It might look nicer, but takes a chunk out of value. While all the hardware is off the wood (don't mess with the stock disc!), take a piece of burlap soaked in Boiled Linseed Oil (BLO), and scrub it like you mean it, going with the grain. The second you're done scrubbing, wipe the stock dry. You aren't using it for a finish, you're using it as a solution to float the grime up out of the wood, and condition/seal it as you do.
Careful where you put the rags/paper towels, and the burlap that you wiped it off with until they dry. BLO can spontaneously combust as it dries.
Do the unfinished wood the same way. Set it some place warm for a day, and buff it out with a clean rag.
Get all that done, re-assemble with your new parts, and post some more pics, "then" I can't give you a value.
Just thinking, with all the boxes of misc. Mauser parts I have laying around, I don't have a single one you need!
Wow Trap! Thank you for all the great info! At Wally world right now stocking up.
 

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A great cleaning solution for dark wood that a Smithsonian furniture restoration expert showed me is a solution of equal parts vinegar, boiled linseed oil, and turpentine. Using this solution, lightly scrub the wood in the direction of the grain with 0000 steel wool, then immediately wipe off. Dispose of the steel wool and all rags where they won't spontaneously combust. It gets rid of the grime while evening out the color (It is also an excellent furniture polish).
 

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A great cleaning solution for dark wood that a Smithsonian furniture restoration expert showed me is a solution of equal parts vinegar, boiled linseed oil, and turpentine. Using this solution, lightly scrub the wood in the direction of the grain with 0000 steel wool, then immediately wipe off. Dispose of the steel wool and all rags where they won't spontaneously combust. It gets rid of the grime while evening out the color (It is also an excellent furniture polish).
Got an old broken stock I use for wood graft donations, I'm going to have to try that.
 

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A great cleaning solution for dark wood that a Smithsonian furniture restoration expert showed me is a solution of equal parts vinegar, boiled linseed oil, and turpentine. Using this solution, lightly scrub the wood in the direction of the grain with 0000 steel wool, then immediately wipe off. Dispose of the steel wool and all rags where they won't spontaneously combust. It gets rid of the grime while evening out the color (It is also an excellent furniture polish).
After this cleaning, should you put anything else on it? terry
 

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After this cleaning, should you put anything else on it? terry
A decent paste wax would do--even a good auto wax will protect the wood and preserve the original finish--a stiff brush might be needed to get dried wax out of any crevices. You can also use a good auto wax on the exposed metal (barrel, receiver)--it will help protect the barrel from finger prints and moisture.
 

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This is a gun THAT SHOULD NOT BE RESTORED.
I do this for a living and this is one that I would tell the owner NOT to give to me for rebluing or redo of the wood.
Do as @TRAPP55 said.
NO COLD BLUE do not try to do anything to the steel other then getting off the rust and a heavy coat of oil (CLP).
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
This is a gun THAT SHOULD NOT BE RESTORED.
I do this for a living and this is one that I would tell the owner NOT to give to me for rebluing or redo of the wood.
Do as @TRAPP55 said.
NO COLD BLUE do not try to do anything to the steel other then getting off the rust and a heavy coat of oil (CLP).
Mike
That's pretty much all I've done so far, gently deal with the rust letting CLP do it's thing and taking it apart and cleaning the stock with a damp cloth. Here's one shot of a cleaned up area.
Material property
 

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You need to get a brass brush and get into ALL the corners (I get mine at the dollar general store for $2.00) It comes in a pack of 3 one brass one steel and one plastic.
Get ALL the rust off every where.
Mike
 
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