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In an attempt to salvage some 200 cases of loaded .243 Winchester (not military possible crimped) bought in a garage sale and somewhat corroded-I began the decapping and noticed many of the primers were fragmenting, the bottom separating and leaving the primer walls still in the pocket-I devised this process:
located a drill bit larger than minimum primer diameter as shown on SAAMI drawing but smaller than max diameter of pocket then ground bit flat on end (effectively an end mill) and drilling the primer out. Once cleaned I finished with an RCBS large rifle pocket scraper, an RCBS case reamer-lightly cleaning the pocket radius and then verifying the pocket dimensions to SAAMI with dial caliper.
So far so good but it is laborious and if ANYONE can advise a better, more accurate, less labor way I would love to hear it.
Thanks
 

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In an attempt to salvage some 200 cases of loaded .243 Winchester (not military possible crimped) bought in a garage sale and somewhat corroded-I began the decapping and noticed many of the primers were fragmenting, the bottom separating and leaving the primer walls still in the pocket-I devised this process:
located a drill bit larger than minimum primer diameter as shown on SAAMI drawing but smaller than max diameter of pocket then ground bit flat on end (effectively an end mill) and drilling the primer out. Once cleaned I finished with an RCBS large rifle pocket scraper, an RCBS case reamer-lightly cleaning the pocket radius and then verifying the pocket dimensions to SAAMI with dial caliper.
So far so good but it is laborious and if ANYONE can advise a better, more accurate, less labor way I would love to hear it.
Thanks
Buy a couple bags of SIG brass.
 

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With the case head up I would try a drop (just one drop) of Kroil or any other penetrating type oil on the primer and let it sit for a day then try to decap as normal. Or maybe a short burst with the lube extension tube in the flash hole from inside the case (case head down) and let sit again. Get the penetrating oil out of the case with a degreaser (break kleen) Or as @shootbrownelk said...
 

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My:twocents:. I suggest sacrificing about four or five cases and cut them in half length wise to inspect the inside for corrosion. If there is any green corrosion along with pitting, I personally would toss them in the scrap brass bin. Brass with corrosion can split when fired and depending on the gun type cause flame cutting in chamber and the bolt face. This hot gas escaping the cartridge case can damage a gun, but could injure the shooter.
F10604A8-A22C-484B-AE29-ED124D824A2E.jpeg
This guy was lucky. It could hand been worse.
Here are pics of ruptured and separated cases.
EA0BA011-52F5-4306-A3C6-39BEB2533F3B.jpeg

98B3EF21-4D8B-4A26-BBAF-07726CA9A958.jpeg

This is what brass fatigue and corrosion can cause. The hot gas from the gun powder can get as hot as 5000*F, which will melt even the hardest of steels. Also once flame cutting accusers in the guns chamber, were the damage is in the chamber, subsequent fried cartridges will rupture at that spot causing more damage to the gun, and ultimately the shooter.

As for your method of removing the stuck spent primers, you should take a hand full of cases and see if the primers will seat with force. If they go in with little resistance, the primer will allow hot 5000*F to escape and flame cut the bolt face.

As for my guns, I will not take the chance of damaging any of my guns or injury to me. Cartridge brass cases are relatively cheap compared the cost of the gun or your face, unless it is some obsolete cartridge, but even the, why take a chance. As an example. I bought a used custom Sako Vixen PPC bolt pistol chambered in 6mmPPC. There are two cartridge case manufactures of this cartridge, (Sako and Norma) so those cases will not be found in a gun store. The gun came with two hundred and sixty once fired factory Sako cases and two boxes of Sako factory ammo. The fired cases look good with no corrosion. As for the factory loaded cartridges, I had decided to pull the bullet from one cartridge so as to see what the bullet and powder looked like. The bullet base had a ring of green corrosion and the case inside neck had a matching ring of green corrosion. So I pulled the rest of those factory loaded cases apart and every one had that ring of green corrosion, so I tossed them in the scrap brass bin. It was kind of disheartening to scrap those forty cases, but it is not worth taking a chance of damaging a rare custom gun, or a rarer me.

Also as FYI. I have never ever heard of crimped in primers for 243 Winchester. Just saying.
 

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To me it just sounds like a lot of hassle to salvage some garage sale ammo. I personally would never buy someone else's reloads. No telling how many times it's been loaded and how long and where it's been stored. I didn't make my earlier post to be a smart azz. To me it just isn't worth the bother. I load for my .243 and I found SIG brass to be better quality than the usual big 3 offerings.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited by Moderator)
My:twocents:. I suggest sacrificing about four or five cases and cut them in half length wise to inspect the inside for corrosion. If there is any green corrosion along with pitting, I personally would toss them in the scrap brass bin. Brass with corrosion can split when fired and depending on the gun type cause flame cutting in chamber and the bolt face. This hot gas escaping the cartridge case can damage a gun, but could injure the shooter.
View attachment 222732 This guy was lucky. It could hand been worse.
Here are pics of ruptured and separated cases.
View attachment 222734
View attachment 222736
This is what brass fatigue and corrosion can cause. The hot gas from the gun powder can get as hot as 5000*F, which will melt even the hardest of steels. Also once flame cutting accusers in the guns chamber, were the damage is in the chamber, subsequent fried cartridges will rupture at that spot causing more damage to the gun, and ultimately the shooter.

As for your method of removing the stuck spent primers, you should take a hand full of cases and see if the primers will seat with force. If they go in with little resistance, the primer will allow hot 5000*F to escape and flame cut the bolt face.

As for my guns, I will not take the chance of damaging any of my guns or injury to me. Cartridge brass cases are relatively cheap compared the cost of the gun or your face, unless it is some obsolete cartridge, but even the, why take a chance. As an example. I bought a used custom Sako Vixen PPC bolt pistol chambered in 6mmPPC. There are two cartridge case manufactures of this cartridge, (Sako and Norma) so those cases will not be found in a gun store. The gun came with two hundred and sixty once fired factory Sako cases and two boxes of Sako factory ammo. The fired cases look good with no corrosion. As for the factory loaded cartridges, I had decided to pull the bullet from one cartridge so as to see what the bullet and powder looked like. The bullet base had a ring of green corrosion and the case inside neck had a matching ring of green corrosion. So I pulled the rest of those factory loaded cases apart and every one had that ring of green corrosion, so I tossed them in the scrap brass bin. It was kind of disheartening to scrap those forty cases, but it is not worth taking a chance of damaging a rare custom gun, or a rarer me.

Also as FYI. I have never ever heard of crimped in primers for 243 Winchester. Just saying.
Thanks,I always like to err on the side of caution and had considered weak points but not yet had explored the ramifications. As I see it, this is a gamble in any light so most likely will scrap "project" (no pun intended) and invest in virgin brass-FYI , your text AND VISUAL AIDS mean much-THANKS

To me it just sounds like a lot of hassle to salvage some garage sale ammo. I personally would never buy someone else's reloads. No telling how many times it's been loaded and how long and where it's been stored. I didn't make my earlier post to be a smart azz. To me it just isn't worth the bother. I load for my .243 and I found SIG brass to be better quality than the usual big 3 offerings.

And your comments just drive home 'elk's' as well-Brass is cheap, compaatively speaking-Thaks so much for the concern!
 

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Fortunately I've not experienced that problem. I think I'd use some Kroil as mentioned above then, just like some difficult to remove bullets, "reseat" the primers (just add a bit of pressure) to break the corrosion between the primer and the primer pocket. And one thought was use a tool like an "Ez Out" to remove the ring.
 

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+1 with the guys that say scrap them. IMHO never a good idea to shoot ammo or use brass that is suspect for any reason. :twocents:
 
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