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Hello,

So, I have been doing research on a bunch of different products for the purposes of lubrication and rust protection. I intend to use these products on pocket knives, but I believe that properties like friction coefficients are more or less universal.

I understand that plenty of threads have been made about lubricants. However, the information is usually sparsely scattered and not directly related to my questions, so I decided to create my own thread.

For lubricants, I am deciding between FrogLube, Weapon Shield, and Nano-Oil. I have seen the test from the maker of Weapon Shield where the FrogLube fails outright, but I also understand that FrogLube is less of an oil and more of a metal seasoning product that requires a surface free of petroleum distillates and continued applications, making me question the validity of the test. Additionally, I have yet to see any individuals make comparisons between Nano-Oil and Weapon Shield.

For rust protection, I am deciding between FrogLube and Eezox. I've seen a few roughly controlled tests on scrap metal, and they seem comparable, but I'm personally leaning towards FrogLube because Eezox supposedly could react with metal over time and cause structural failure. Of course, more information is welcome from anyone who has personal experience or understands the theory behind the concern.

A few requests for those that want to chip in their two cents: try to compare your favorite/recommendation with one of the products listed above. Of course, this also means that ideally, you have used both of the products you are comparing. While I might be inclined to believe your recommendations, all human experience is relative, so just saying "FrogLube is great!" is far less helpful than saying "Weapon Shield is more reliable than Frog Lube".

A side note for those who are going to comment on FrogLube (although these instructions apply to any product recommendations):
When comparing products, make sure that you have actually followed manufacturer instructions completely. For example, many FrogLube users complain of the product congealing after firing sessions, but if the product has been applied correctly, then all excess product has been removed and the gun is "dry". As such, saying "FrogLube sucks" based on such an experience is not an accurate representation of its performance.

Of course, if you have any products that you believe are better than the ones I listed, and have the experience to back up your belief (see above), feel free to list them. It's not like I have committed to any particular choice as of the time of this writing, so all recommendations (based on comparisons) are appreciated.

Thanks in advance, Y'all,

VIXIVIXIV
 

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I generally shoot black powder and petroleum products are a no-no, petroleum under heat and pressure combined with the fowling from black makes tar. So how does that pertain to taking care of a pocket knife? I like to cut apples with my pocket knife and oranges and I'll open the occasional bag of snacks with it and I'd rather not eat something that has frog lube or Rem oil or such like that on it contaminating things I plan on eating.

I'll use canola oil or olive oil in my black powder lube along with bees wax and it keeps things rust free during storage and I oil my knife with canola or olive oil and sure the blade has over the last twenty years of living in my pocket developed a light grey patina, but it's never rusted and I don't have to worry about cleaning gun oil off of it before I slice into an apple or orange.
 

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I have used Frog Lube but found it to be not much of an oil and it kind of "gummed" up what it was applied to. I have never used the other three you mention. For years (while in the Army) I used LSA, because the price was right.;) The only gun lubricant that I use now is Silver Bullet Gun Oil which is made with 13% pig fat. I use it on just about everything that requires oil.
 

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FrogLube users complain of the product congealing after firing sessions
That's probably because of incorrect usage. I use it and I never have those problems. I don't use it in the lower. I just use it in the upper for the bcg and receiver. It can sit over the winter. Take it out and it's clean and ready to go. When shooting is finished, I take the bcg out and wipe it off as it sweats out its own lube. This failure to wipe it down is proably where they say it congeals. If you don't use the FL on the firing pin channel, it won't congeal. Other than that, any thing congealed will not effect it's use in the bcg area. But again, I wipe mine off because it also cleans it as the fowling wipes off. You still have to tear it down like any bcg to care for the bolt.
 

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Why would you be considering the friction coefficent of a lubricant on a pocket knife? The motion of a knife blade opening and closing is clearly in the boundry lubrication regime.
Reference the Stribeck Curve

View attachment 127444
db, I believe he's using knives because at the moment he can't posses guns for whatever reason (his business).
 

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db, I believe he's using knives because at the moment he can't posses guns for whatever reason (his business).
Yeah, I read that part. He is talking about the properties of lubricants for knives.

My question was why would you consider the friction coefficent of a lubricant for a knife?
Go back and read it again
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Why would you be considering the friction coefficent of a lubricant on a pocket knife? The motion of a knife blade opening and closing is clearly in the boundry lubrication regime.
Reference the Stribeck Curve

View attachment 127444
I just mentioned friction coefficients as a quick way to say that smooth lubricant is a smooth lubricant, and a gummy lubricant is a gummy lubricant, whether it be in guns or knives. It's not like I'm actually measuring these things, as real life is the ultimate metric (remember, the doctors said Thalidomide was safe!)
 

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Discussion Starter #10
So how does that pertain to taking care of a pocket knife? I like to cut apples with my pocket knife and oranges and I'll open the occasional bag of snacks with it and I'd rather not eat something that has frog lube or Rem oil or such like that on it contaminating things I plan on eating.
I suppose your knife is more traditional or something along those lines, and as such is not as sensitive to grit/friction. However, more modern pocket knives often have pivots supported by captive bearings and require a smooth action in order to be opened reliably, like shown in the video provided.
 

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Frog lube is coconut oil.
Canola and olive oil can go rancid, and will gum up..
Any real oil will do. I use Quick Release, BreakFree and WD40.
There is absolutely no reason to have bearings on a folding knife, other than to make people spend more money. And- you can take that to the bank!
 

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Case xx three blade stockman, manufactured between 1940 and '64, found it on the ground under a car in a junkyard back in the '90's, been packing it ever since.

Never have cared much for the style of knives in the video, if I need a knife for self defense or for hunting I'll wear a fixed blade on my belt.

Kind of like this one I threw together a year or so ago.

171689_20c20b85a6176c1bb4070c6f9574cbdb[1].jpg
 

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If you clean and lube your folding knife today with any good quality oil, follow up annually with a good cleaning and another drop of the same oil, and use the knife daily for the rest of your life you put won't any measurable wear on the pivot.

Do you want to know how to lube a firearm?

The same way. Clean it and lube it with any quality oil. Care and maintenance protect metals, not specific lubricants.
 

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friction coefficients have to do with measuring the force it takes to move one object against another one. Its the basics of Tribology
What you are referring to are lubricant properties
On a molecular level :D.
 

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