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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have all his military documents and his regiments history. Just wanted to know exactly what his gun is and when and where it was manufactured. I know it says tryon on the plate behind the hammer. Also has marks of RR or BR on patch box plate and underside of barrel hidden by the stock.
 

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I wish I could help you. Someone here certainly can. I know I would love to have that as a family heirloom or just even in my collection. No way I will be able to afford it though. :(
 

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This is some info I found it's in regards to Texas independence from Mexico:

The smoothbore musket was the standard, though as some have already said, they brought what they had. After Texas got their independence they purchased, in 1840 from Tryon a Philadelphia contractor, a quantity of US M1816 muskets as their standard arm. 1,500 were ordered, enough to equip two regiments, but not all were delivered due to Texas' inability to pay for them. They ended up with 860 and 260 of the new muskets were stolen from the Texas Arsenal.

so, it could be a US M1816
 

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It looks like a Kentucky or Pennsylvania Rifle

was he Confederate?

I don't think that gun was issued from either side during the Civil War

Sometimes the Confederate's didn't have enough guns to issue so the guys had to use their personal hunting rifles.. that would be my guess

whatever you do .. don't go polishing on it with cleaners, you will ruin the patina and hurt the collector value.
 

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Tryon was a Pennsylvania contractor. That much I've been able to find out. I also found out that the Tyrons came in .45, .50, and .54 cal.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
He was confederate from Mississippi. Was in the 33rd regiment Mississippi infantry. Fought in the second battle of Corinth. It does say in some of the history that when they mustered they had over 300 "condemned" rifles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
In part of the history it says his regiment charged enemy lines with empty weapons. It does have a crack in stock in front of trigger guard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I figured it was his personal firearm. But an interesting fact was his father was a scout in the war of 1812 battle of New Orleans. Was wondering if it might be a pass down from his dad.
 

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That could be that it was an 1812 era musket passed down. The double ovals are where I'm finding the difficulty - I can't find any pictures of any musket with those double ovals.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
I found a couple of tryon half stock pictures that looked like they had the ovals put other stuff didn't match. It has double set trigger. All the inlays look silver. Stock has checkering at the wrist. Has the cheek relief on left side of stock.
 
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