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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went to gun range today first time shooting my Gock 26 . First couple rounds fired no problem, Then JAM. To me it seemed as if it was trying to double feed . So I clear the gun and reload fire 3 rounds no problem. Next shot it Jams..

Brass did not eject all the way. My first thought was clip problem So I take out Glock 17 insert clip fire 3 rounds all fgood.
4th round it jams..

Range officer comes over clears it reloads clip fires 4 rounds no problem , I go to fire... jam, I'm no expert but I own both Glock17 5th gen And the 26. I know how to break down my fire arms and clean them.

I keep it cased except at night. Im a single female I live alone and my daddy always said it aint going to do you any good if you fumbling with locks, But even then when I take it out its holstered on night stand wake up it goes in case, I can not figure it out what can be the issue, The only thing that I can even remotely see a possibility is gun range makes you use their ammo .... Any suggestions
 

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See if you may be doing what is being illustrated in this video. With the range officer only firing one string of 4 rounds, it may not have proven the gun itself does not have a problem. But you might want to look closely at how you are holding it when firing.
This is only one video of many that try to explain and illustrate this problem.
Limp Wristing Glock Pistols - YouTube
 

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One of my daughters gets this problem with almost every semi-auto she shoots. She has to focus on every shot. She can even limp wrist my Colt 1911 in 9mm.
 

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My wife went thru the same thing - limp wrist - when she 1st got her H&K. She went down to an S&W EZ380 and won't trade it for the world (I like it cause it helps her with her grip she can fire anything now). Which is great for me cause her HK9mm is the sweetest 9mil I've ever shot
 

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Agreed.. check that wrist and grip firmness. semi auto handgun hate a recoiling hand.
 

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My first thought was also limp wristing, but since the range made you use their ammo, if it was re-loads, it might be the problem. Glock is very specific about not using re-loads. That being said, I have fired hundreds of rounds of re-loads through my G-26 with never a problem.
When I first fired my G-26, my first thought was that it was the smoothest 9mm I ever shot, & it remained so until I got a Sig 229.
My step-daughter & my daughter-in-law have all shot many mags through my Glock with no problems. I would let a few other people fire your gun to see if they can duplicate the issue. Some guns are very sensitive to what degree of limp-wristing they can tolerate. A good example is a Key-Tec P3AT. They have gotten a poor reputation for FF & FE mostly due to limp-wriisting.
Make sure you clean the gun & use the Glock copper based lube on the slide rails. All Glocks come from the factory with that lube. My understanding is that it helps wear in the slides & keep them lubed. A lot of people mistake the residue for rust & work hard to get it off, big mistake! If you don't have it, order a small squeeze bottle right from Glock. I have gotten in the habit of using it on other semi's also. Just don't over lube. Glocks don't like too much oil or grease. Less is more. I have 5 Glocks & have never had an issue with any of them. Remember, they are mass produced & it's always possible to get a bad one, but that's what warrantees are for. My G-26 was my EDC for many yrs. until Sig came out with the P-365. Shorts & a tee shirt every day makes pocket carry important & the G-26 is borderline. OTB with a jacket or sport coat it's still my go to gun.
 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I think you all are exactly right, I went back today and shot some more and the gun was just right, The problem is I had surgery on my after the first suregery didnt help they did a second one , I can shoot but as today proved I have to really concentrate SO I guess my next question would be and paticular hand gun that you guys can recommend that has not as much recoil? I did get a chance to shoot the S333 Revolver and I really like it, But I also worry about the stopping power, I will not pull my gun unless I am ready to pull the trigger and I know how dangerous a 22 can be. But a 22 and 25 we used to snake hunt with, FOr self defense I am not sure that's the way to go, And I know I am going to need it not sure when but I will and lets say the person is 6 foot 265 pounds is that 22 going to do what I need it to do?
 

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Hello MsLady

I don't believe I've noticed you here before.

My wife also had some wrist related surgery done (intersection syndrome stuff) and a year of therapy beforehand, so she was out of our family shooting competitions for awhile and I didn't want her shooting her .9mm or .45 pistols for awhile afterwards, but she was feigning, understandably, so, since she loves shooting her Glock 19 I suggested a Glock 44 chambered in .22 LR.

Of course there are a plethora of good offerings out there chambered in .22, but I wanted her to try the Glock since she'd essentially be staying familiar with the controls on her Glock 19 with it, until we felt that it was safe for her to move back to the .9mm.

There are a couple things to consider with the Glock 44. It's a lot lighter than any of the other Glocks out there and it only wants to feed 40 grain ammo. I've heard people say that "all autoloading .22 pistols prefer 40 grain", but I've never really noticed until using this one. All I can say is that soon after buying it she mentioned putting it in her truck bag and I immediately realized that I had been plinking with it every day off the back porch, what was I going to do when she was gone? So we had to buy me one. Then her mom used one of ours to qualify with and we had to get her one on order. They are just too much fun.

You speak of self defense... I'd say keep that Glock 26 handy for the unlikely event that you ever have to stop that 265lb meth fueled monster and practice with the one you're comfortable with. BUT the next thing I'll say is something the folks on TFF are sick of hearing me talk about. I've taken some HUGE, extremely ANGRY, wild boar out of my hog trap with a single shot to the brain pan with a standard .22LR. So it's all about shot placement... but we don't know what situation the bad guy will put us in, will we have time for "shot placement"? Who knows... I'll go with the largest caliber I can carry comfortably.
 

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I would not abandon ship yet. Which wrist was operated on and which is your dominate hand. I'm saying this only because your support hand should be around 70% of the strength and the trigger hand 30 approx. But work on that hand to make it stronger before getting rid of the gun to go to a lesser preferred caliber. There are simple exercises like a rubber ball that you squeeze while watching tv etc. Find the problem first.
 

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The nice thing about revolvers for concealed carry is that you don't have to worry about the weak wrist effecting its reliability. But with weak wrists you also don't want too much recoil either. I wish they made the Ruger LCR revolver in the 3" model chambered for the .327 Magnum which also allows you to carry it with the less powerful but still effective .32 H&R round. Even better, you can practice with the .32 S&W long which has very soft recoil. So far though, Ruger only offers that caliber in the shorter 2" snub-nosed revolver which would be similar to the S333 you've already fired. I can't say I like that exposed trigger on the S333 for safety reasons. The nice thing about these small revolvers is that in a down and dirty fight for your life you can put the revolver up against the attackers body and it will still shoot. Most autos will jam in that situation. You will have to practice alot with one as it take time to get good with one. The double action long trigger pull is heavier and tends to pull the shot to the side as can how you grip it. In time you learn to control one and acquire accuracy also.

The 3" model comes in .38 special which generally is easier to shoot more accurately at first. The recoil is not that punishing and maybe a little less or similar to the 9mm Glock. You can practice with lighter full wadcutter loads and some even carry them which are softer shooting than the +P rounds that are often recommended.

The Ruger LCRs generally have a smoother and lighter trigger pull than many other revolvers out there currently. You will have to decide if you'd want the one with or without an external hammer. For protection and concealed carry the model without an exposed hammer is generally recommended so that the hammer does not get caught on clothing, pockets or anything when you need to draw it under stress. That means you would be giving up the lighter trigger pull available when you cock the hammer first - which should never be done in a fight anyway for fear of it going off when you really don't want it to. Anyway, that is one recommendation for your consideration. The .38 has a 5 shot capacity and comes in a 2" or 3" version .The .327 magnum has a 6 shot capacity and so far is only offered in 2". The magnum is extremely load and has very noticeable recoil. Many carry the less powerful but still effective 32 H&R round in it.

S333 Thunderstruck™ - Standard Mfg. Co. LLC (stdgun.com)

Ruger® LCRx® Double-Action Revolver Model 5431 3" 38 special

Ruger® LCR® Double-Action Revolver Model 54522" 327 magnum

As already said, you may be able to strengthen your wrists and learn to grip the Glock reliably in the future. If you can afford to, keep the Glock and find something a little easier to handle and more reliable for now.

When you drop down into the .32s and .380s and even .38 specials you need to carefully consider which rounds give the best penetration for the 200 pound + attacker or anyone with winter clothes on. These charts help us to decide on our carry ammo.
Handgun Self-Defense Ammunition - Ballistic Testing Data (luckygunner.com)

Pocket Pistol Caliber Ballistic Gel Tests - LuckyGunner.com Labs
 

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I am going to need it not sure when but I will and lets say the person is 6 foot 265 pounds is that 22 going to do what I need it to do?
I wouldn't count on it.
 

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You can find sp101 3" in 327 federal. Can then run HR mags if needed. Charter arms has a professional in 32hrmag. I have both. Great guns.

For stopping power and reduced recoil.. A 357 mag with 38+p loaded works.
 

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A revolver is the only firearm that is not sensitive to limp-wristing. I have a Ruger LCR in .327 Federal Mag. IMHO, it's recoil is sharper than any 9mm I ever fired. I have fired the SP 101 in the same caliber & it is more manageable because it is an all metal gun & therefore heavier. So there's the rub. The felt recoil is directly proportional to the weight of the gun & somewhat dependent on the weight distribution, ie, the length of the barrel. The bottom line is, most semi's, to some extent, are sensitive to limp-wristing. You may experience FF or FE, never a good thing in life or death situations. This will not/cannot occur in a revolver. The most serious trade-off is round count. If you can live with 5 or 6 rounds, by all means get a revolver.
I used to carry a Kel-Tec P3AT. For the smallest, lightest, most concealable production semi-automatic pistol on the market, it is perhaps the most sensitive to limp-wristing. Also, because of its .380 cal capability , it is probably the worst range gun I have ever fired. A full mag will leave me with a sore thump & palm, two mags will leave black & blue marks. I can pocket carry it & forget its there & I can carry a spare 8 round mag. The best part was it is also cheaper than any other model I know of with the possible exception of some guns I wouldn't use as fishing weights. Plus, it comes with a lifetime warranty & they honor it with no problems.
As you can see, there is no perfect gun. I know this because I have a gun safe full of ones that fall short. I keep thinking the next one will be perfect. Just like holsters. LOL!
At the end of the day, I would carry the biggest gun, in the largest caliber, that holds the most rounds that you shoot the best. It's as simple as that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
I really appreciate all of your responses. I am going through a situation and every free minute I have I am working on my shooting. Just today I was at range, I am going to continue to work with my glock. Although I shot the glock 19 today, Maybe it's just me but the 19 not only did I lay my shots on target more consecutively but M went though a box and a half of ammo and my wrist did not start burning as with the 26. I like my 26 because I like the size, But I really am starting to wonder if me going for what is smaller in physical size is going to jeopardize what I need to do if and when the time comes, I know I seem picky but theres reason, I'm 4 ft 11 118 lbs. For now I will continue practicing and for back up I finally gave in and put a order in for the Syren XLR5 for my house. Growing up I was taught that a pump shot gun makes a distinct sound and if they still trying to come in start shooting, Now that I am by myself and in a situation I feel like depending on that sound will be
gambling with my life.
 

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Syren XLR5: For Women Only (range365.com) That certainly is a fine shotgun for women with some design features that make it sized properly. It looks like it is a semi auto and not a pump which is fine. The sound of the action closing will be noticeable, true. That may or may not be a deterrent. Anyone with any common sense would think twice at the sound of any action closing but I certainly wouldn't rely on anyone committing a criminal act, especially a violent one to have any common sense. You should consider that 28" barrel length. That will be a bit unwieldy in many hallways and tight spots in the home. Most of us who rely upon a shotgun for home defense make sure that it has a shorter barrel that stays within legal limits. 18 1/2 to 20" is more common. I can't find where Syren offers a shorter barrel. Their guns are designed for the shooting sports and I'm sure women love them. I don't see where they list a shorter deer barrel which would be better for your purposes.

My nearly 40 year old daughter is about your size. The last time we went to the range together she picked up my full size Colt 1911 and placed three very accurate shots into the target. To my surprise she instantly fell in love with it and now I have another firearm that I don't dare sell or trade. That seems to happen each time one of the women take a liking to one. I never would have expected her to like that large and heavy all steel pistol but I think the weight appealed to her. It made for a steady accurate platform to launch the heavier .45 round, absorb some recoil and also the 5" barrel length for accurate aiming. Surprise, surprise.
 

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Im a firm believer in 5 shot 38spl revolvers like the solid sw 36 and it's byproducts. In an adrinal moment a lot of stuff can happen that you never thought possible and dealing with if a round is chambered, is the safety on, or will it stovepipe is not what is needing to be on a persons mind or hand in a time like that (Man/Woman seasoned/green).

My wife has small hands and 38s small 380s and 9mms are all too much for her to handle even in heavier frame handguns. I got her a 6 shot 32 h&r mag from charter arms and she is pleased with it. She uses 32 s&w longs for practic and packs magnum hp rounds for defense purposes. Her mom is the same but she has a 22mag revolver that she likes.
 
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