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When I was younger, I would hunt from a tree stand. Now that , I am older, my legs are not what they once were. Now , I hunt from the ground. From time to time , I would make a ground blind. Getting ready to make a ground blind. I was thinking about how ,I was going to build it. Then, I was hit with a idea.( Some time the simplest of things escape me.) Build the frame of the blind, fill it in a little. Then plant a flower that has a vine to it. One that comes up every year. The flower and vine would grow, filling in the empty spots. Plus, it would look natural, and year after year, it would get better and better. Do any of you do this.
 

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For The ground blinds that i have made I use some camo burlap material. I just put a few sticks in the ground a put the camo material around them. I sit on a little stool that i made. also try to make sure i have some natural blow down limbs hiding me. But mostly i hunt from a uncomfortable ladder stand.
 

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I just use camo colored burlap and some old fiberglass tent poles. Set it up a few weeks ahead of time and leave it up until the burlap decays and do it again.
 
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I cheated. Joyce and I both have store bought ground blinds. HOWSOMEVER!!! I used to build ground blinds and Joyce killed her first deer out of one.

Now, with Joyce being an Advanced Master Gardener, Emeritus, your idea of a vining plant would appeal to her. I bet she could make some suggestions as to which vine to plant. Honeysuckle comes to mind but the deer would be dining in your lap.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
I cheated. Joyce and I both have store bought ground blinds. HOWSOMEVER!!! I used to build ground blinds and Joyce killed her first deer out of one.

Now, with Joyce being an Advanced Master Gardener, Emeritus, your idea of a vining plant would appeal to her. I bet she could make some suggestions as to which vine to plant. Honeysuckle comes to mind but the deer would be dining in your lap.
I, am looking for some ideas as what to plant. I, am thinking, something that comes up every year, and some thing that will grow in the shade. As my blind will be in the woods. Thank You for any help you can give me. I have been looking on the internet, most do not say weather plant in sun or shade. Thank You again.
 

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I'll ask Joyce when she gets up. You're in Ohio, where in Ohio? You'll have 2 or 3 different zones and she'll ask. I'd think you want something pretty aggressive to grow as much as I think it will need to. Honeysuckle does still come to mind, if it will grow in your zone and if the deer would stay off it long enough for it to grow.
 

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I'll ask Joyce when she gets up. You're in Ohio, where in Ohio? You'll have 2 or 3 different zones and she'll ask. I'd think you want something pretty aggressive to grow as much as I think it will need to. Honeysuckle does still come to mind, if it will grow in your zone and if the deer would stay off it long enough for it to grow.
Thank you. I, live in canton.
 

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Joyce asked, is your blind in the woods with full shade or mostly shade? If so, heavy, vining plants aren't going to do what you want unless you're willing to water and fertilize them faithfully. Even then it might not get full like you'd want. She said heavy vining plants want full or nearly full sun. I can see that in one of her flower beds. She has some clematis planted that's been there for 10 years and it still looks sickly...and it's in full shade. She just told me she's looked for decades for a heavily vining plant that likes the shade, unsuccessfully. You and us are in the same growing zone so she's pretty familiar with what will and won't work.

Check your local greenhouses or whatever state agency of yours deals with native plants. They might have an idea. I believe this is your best bet.

Joyce just mentioned that you might try Passion Flower. It too likes full sun and is......very aggressive but it might not do well in the woods either. She just mentioned another...as the thoughts come.....Sweet Autumn Clematis could work. The thing is with any of those you're looking at 2-3 years before they get thick and, again, soil type, how often you fertilize and water it is going to make all the difference in the world. She didn't think Honeysuckle would work at all in full shade.
 

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Joyce asked, is your blind in the woods with full shade or mostly shade? If so, heavy, vining plants aren't going to do what you want unless you're willing to water and fertilize them faithfully. Even then it might not get full like you'd want. She said heavy vining plants want full or nearly full sun. I can see that in one of her flower beds. She has some clematis planted that's been there for 10 years and it still looks sickly...and it's in full shade. She just told me she's looked for decades for a heavily vining plant that likes the shade, unsuccessfully. You and us are in the same growing zone so she's pretty familiar with what will and won't work.

Check your local greenhouses or whatever state agency of yours deals with native plants. They might have an idea. I believe this is your best bet.

Joyce just mentioned that you might try Passion Flower. It too likes full sun and is......very aggressive but it might not do well in the woods either. She just mentioned another...as the thoughts come.....Sweet Autumn Clematis could work. The thing is with any of those you're looking at 2-3 years before they get thick and, again, soil type, how often you fertilize and water it is going to make all the difference in the world. She didn't think Honeysuckle would work at all in full shade.
Thank you and Joyce. I, suppose it will not hurt to expermint a little.
 

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What about finding some type of conifer branches to lay over/around your structure? Won't grow each year, but they usually stay fairly in-tack and provide cover for a while even once dead and dry.

I don't know enough about vines and plants, but there are several types of vines in the Virginia area that are not natural to the habitat and have become invasive. Doing more harm to trees and other plants. Joyce, referenced above, will I'm sure be able to help with that more than I could.
 

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I've never had the pleasure of using a blind for hunting, We always walk and stalk, and on occasion on horseback, the last couple of years it was on a ATV. Now I wouldn't mind putting spikes on the grill guard and run them down.
 

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I've never had the pleasure of using a blind for hunting, We always walk and stalk, and on occasion on horseback, the last couple of years it was on a ATV. Now I wouldn't mind putting spikes on the grill guard and run them down.
When I was younger, I loved to walk and stalk. However, at 72, my walking in the woods is over. Now, I go and find a place to sit.
 

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We used to set ground blinds all over the river bottom property. 6 T-Post and camo netting. Hard to explain but you make a square but the backside is an L, you drive 4 post to make the square (backside is shorter than front for entryway ,but you use the other two as a second backside to walk in-like a hallway. That way wind does not enter through the backside. Easy up-easy move. Sort of like a maze if you will. Two wraps of camo netting blocks the wind pretty well too.
 

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You might look around the woods to see if anything is growing locally that you could transpant. Just make sure it is not something you are alergic to. Seem like I start itching every time I trim those vines growing up trees. Also, most natural stuff seems to have briers and stickers like the invasive wild rose bushs we have around here. I got in the habit of bringing a long 22" machete in with me when prepping a new stand site. Anything shorter and the vine seemed to bounce back and get me.
 

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Or you could just spend a hundred bucks and buy a blind. Put it out 2-3 weeks before season and they ignore it. They're also dry in the rain and stand up to the wind pretty darn good. Ours have been out for 3-4 months through 30 mph sustained and gusts up to 40 and never moved. They take about 10 minutes to set up and about an equal time to take down. If you want to hunt someplace else you don't have to build another blind.
 

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You might look around the woods to see if anything is growing locally that you could transpant. Just make sure it is not something you are alergic to. Seem like I start itching every time I trim those vines growing up trees. Also, most natural stuff seems to have briers and stickers like the invasive wild rose bushs we have around here. I got in the habit of bringing a long 22" machete in with me when prepping a new stand site. Anything shorter and the vine seemed to bounce back and get me.
For what it's worth, I fashioned a long handled corn knife for briars. Machetes tend to bounce them around, getting them at the base has resulted in less kick back for me. Something akin to this: https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/groundwork-corn-knife. The hooked end seems to pull at them pretty good.
 

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Or you could just spend a hundred bucks and buy a blind. Put it out 2-3 weeks before season and they ignore it. They're also dry in the rain and stand up to the wind pretty darn good. Ours have been out for 3-4 months through 30 mph sustained and gusts up to 40 and never moved. They take about 10 minutes to set up and about an equal time to take down. If you want to hunt someplace else you don't have to build another blind.
Yep, except that mine were only about sixty bucks apiece two years ago. Take them down after the season is over and they will last a long time. Sat in one of mine this afternoon; no shooters, but saw six head. One little spike got close enough for me to reach out and touch. He had no problem with the blind.
 

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When I was younger, I would hunt from a tree stand. Now that , I am older, my legs are not what they once were. Now , I hunt from the ground. From time to time , I would make a ground blind. Getting ready to make a ground blind. I was thinking about how ,I was going to build it. Then, I was hit with a idea.( Some time the simplest of things escape me.) Build the frame of the blind, fill it in a little. Then plant a flower that has a vine to it. One that comes up every year. The flower and vine would grow, filling in the empty spots. Plus, it would look natural, and year after year, it would get better and better. Do any of you do this.
I tried portable ground blinds the first time about 15 years ago. About 12 years ago, I tried one of the chair blinds, they fit in a back pack that comes with them and I use one every year.. Just the last couple years I have used them 7-8 days during rain, sleet, snow and ice. Deer move in the bottoms a lot during really bad weather. A couple years ago year 2 buddies gave up and went in after about 4 hours of heavy sleet and freezing rain icing over the blind and the whole world really, they called asking if I was OK, well sure, toasty and dry. Both of them bought the chair blinds for this year and we all used them several days when a wicked ice storm hit. Then just before the second season I learned about the 2 person blind, I bought one and actually bought them for both of my buddies. You just strap them on and find a hillside overlooking a game trail and set up in one minute. Wind is not too bad because you hold it down with your body. I had both deer and coyotes within 30 yards and they do not let your smell out. One buddy used one for two days this year in bitter cold and snow and even hail and is sold on the larger one. We are getting older and while we have elevated blinds we just do not want to be up there when it gets really bad, these let us stay out there when the deer are moving on those bad days. Sitting in a tree stand during freezing rain is just no fun. The single blind is about $89 and the w 2 person was $135. Not cheap but gave us extra days in the field. They are also perfect for coyotes.

Cannot recommend them more. Here is a picture.
240675
 
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