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Discussion Starter #1
I live in Florida and when I bought my house the previous owner left her liberty safe. I have been having trouble with my softer gun stocks sticking to the bottom of the safe. I use a dehumidifier but never had this problem in South Carolina. Any help with this is greatly appreciated. The safe is a Liberty Fatboy and I use a 18 inch dehumidifier in it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited by Moderator)
Is the floor of the safe carpeted, a rubber pad, or just the steel bottom?
The floor is carpeted and I even put a shelf in the bottom that was a pressed particle board with polyurethane on it and it still stuck to it

Is it up off the floor?
? I am not sure what you are asking. The guns sit in the bottom of the safe with stock down and barrel up.
 

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Have you checked the floor of safe? Damp?
Do you have radiate heat in floor of your home? How high Temp you running this winter?

Lay a paper towel with some weight on it next to safe to check since you said it has carpet under it. Ground water level might be rising and condense in your safe.
Even here in Oklahoma we lived in house back in 80's that was slab floor but when had large rain fall several days water was flooding central air ducts in floor.

Several years ago we thought a pup was using place by closet instead of going outside. Found had leak in bathroom on other side of wall when Mama said her toilet was wobbled at times. Closet bolt had broke flange on drain.

If you have head room in safe raise secondary floor a few inches to allow air to circulate under secondary floor of safe.
If notice moisture once raised secondary floor you might consider some silica help keep dry, to go between floors of safe.
Good Luck!
 

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When we first moved to Florida over 20 yrs ago, we brought 2 metal gun safes with from central Illinois. They both had some sort of rubber pad on the bottom & on each shelf. After a few yrs down here I noticed a black gummy deposit sticking to the recoil pads of my shotguns & on a few of my hand guns that I didn't keep the boxes they came in. I found that the rubber-like pads were decomposing into a sticky mess as were the foam bumpers in the barrel groves of the rifles slots. To this day, I don't know if it was caused by the gun oil or the climate. I couldn't even get it to come completely off the shelving or bottom. I ended up purchasing a new safe completely lined with a carpet-like material & have had no problem since. We do however have a humidistat that can over ride the thermostat in the event the humidity in the house gets too high. The A/C will kick on lowering the humidity regardless of the temp setting.
 

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The gummy rubber was commonly used years ago. Over time it would turn to a tar like substance.

High end audio speaker manufacturers were using that rubber as the cone suspension system. Eventually the rubber turned to tar and the cone was no longer held to the frame of the speaker totally ruining the speaker and its sound output. It took something like a decade or more. Along those same lines I had a better older Single Lens Reflex camera with light seals on the body made of that rubber. It too eventually turned to tar. At great expense I had to have a camera repair company replace all the rubber seals in the camera.

I think some here are suggesting that the safe be raised off the floor so air can circulate under it. Sitting it on say three 2 x 4 off the floor might help.

Do not take excessive humidity lightly. It cost me two old guns when in my desert area they rusted beyond repair over a two year period. My swamp cooler was direct at the safe door (20 foot separation) where these guns were stored undisturbed for two years (two cooling seasons). Other guns in silicone impregnated "socks" survived without damage but the bare guns were lost to deep rust pits. Those two guns became wall hangers in my friends mini-ghost town in his back lot.

LDBennett
 

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A close buddy has a swamp cooler that he uses to save money instead of turning on his a/c unit which saves him a lot of money.Out here in Nevada your A/c running in July and August can easily cost $400 to $500 a month.His is $100+ running a swamp cooler.Anyway all his guns were rusted in his safe and also his steel AK mags.
 

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A close buddy has a swamp cooler that he uses to save money instead of turning on his a/c unit which saves him a lot of money.Out here in Nevada your A/c running in July and August can easily cost $400 to $500 a month.His is $100+ running a swamp cooler.Anyway all his guns were rusted in his safe and also his steel AK mags.
I call that false economy:eek::oops:
 

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The trick is not to put the safe in the same room let alone let it blow directly on the safe door. Another thing I learned is silicone impregnated gun storage socks WORK. Two other guns in that safe in those socks were fine. The safe is now moved and the other gun safes are a room away, out of the wet cool swamp cooler air flow path.

The two guns ruined were only so-so guns anyway. One was a Mosin-Nagant that was far from a favorite and the other was an inheritance from a cousin out of the blue. It was a Remington Model 11 shotgun (same as Browning Auto 5) that was completely worn out. I actually don't moss either one. After that I added desiccant canister to my three other safes, just in case.

Getting three successive month electric bills in the 3 to 4 hundred dollar range to run A/C during the summer in the desert is not in my budget. So I run a single swamp cooler at about $100 a month during the summer months. The house rarely gets above 80 degrees throughout. Want to cool a room? Just open a window slightly to get the cool swamp air flowing through the room. I have been doing it this way for 15 years. This one rusty gun episode last year was the first and only time anything has rusted from the humid swamp cooler air. And that was because the gun safe was directly in front of the swamp cooler outlet but 20 feet away). Desert dweller love swamp coolers.

LDBennett
 

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I have seen at least two people mention "swamp cooler". I looked it up and all I see are some sort of evaporator, but what do they do?
 

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I have seen at least two people mention "swamp cooler". I looked it up and all I see are some sort of evaporator, but what do they do?
They are boxes about 3 foot cubed or even bigger. They are technically Evaporative Coolers. Usually three sides have a straw matt type filter element, about the size of the whole sides of the box, that is soaked in water from a drip system at the top of each filter driven by a water pump. The bottom of the box is a water tank fed by a float system and a water source. Inside the box is a large drum type blower that pulls air through the filters and pushes it out an opening into the house. Inside the house are the AC power cord and the fan and water pump controls. There is a grill over the house opening usually with slats to direct the air flow. There are swamp cooler that are meant to go in a window, ones that go through a wall hole, and larger ones that feed the whole house from the roof.

You never want to use these in humid climates. Desert climates are perfect for them because they raise the humidity to more acceptable levels in the dry air deserts normally have (at least in the Mojave Desert but not so much in the Sonora Desert....think Tuscan or Pheonix where summer is their hot wet season). In my CA High Desert environment my humidity with the swamp cooler running in the summer is normally about 50% while outside it may be less than 10% humidity.

They are a maintenance nightmare compared to A/C but they are extremely less expensive to buy. You have to change out the filters about every other year as they can calcified from tap water. The pumps get replaced every few years. The filters, the pump and the float vale are all very inexpensive. The blower motor is about $100and I have replaced mine. Eventually the tank rusts out if you don't keep a good tank coating on its bottom. I've done all this to mine including replacing the blower bearings a couple times but mine is about 15 years old and still going strong if I maintain it.

A/C of course is better for cooling but the costs of running it and eventually replacing it (and you will if you use it) are enormous. Mine is a house top unit, combo heating and A/C. A recent heater service revealed I may get another 5 years out of this 20 year old unit with the cost of replacement well over $6000 installed. When the A/C goes out that usually means replacing the whole unit. I don't use my A/C portion so maybe I'll be able to nurse it along for more than that. Here is a link to a typical one:

https://www.grainger.com/product/4R...ice^c-plaid^109227751077-sku^4RNP5-adType^PLA


LDBennett
 

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Thank you LD, that truly gives me a much clearer picture as to what it is, You also answered a question in the second paragraph, that came to my mind while reading the first paragraph
 

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I have a heater bar on one side of the safe that has a middle divider w/ adjustable shelves on each side and 2 reusable desecant containers (one sits on the high ledge and one sits low near the floor on the non-side heater bar). I take the desecants out every two weeks and plug them into power for a full day to dry them out before they go back in the safe. The two week was determined by the little indicators that say when to dry them out. Now it's just a task that my calendar reminds me to do every couple of weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I live in Florida and when I bought my house the previous owner left her liberty safe. I have been having trouble with my softer gun stocks sticking to the bottom of the safe. I use a dehumidifier but never had this problem in South Carolina. Any help with this is greatly appreciated. The safe is a Liberty Fatboy and I use a 18 inch dehumidifier in it.
I should expand a little on the safe location. It sits in my garage (attached) to the house. The garage floor is concrete and it is not heated or cooled. I am assuming it is because of the higher humidity being out in a hot garage. Should I purchase another dehumidifier or a different route altogether? The inside of safe has a thin carpet like material in it. Should I get safe off of the floor? Didn't want to, making it easier to tip over in the event of burglary. Hope you can help with this, and again thanks for all the help so far.
 

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Location is a huge factor. On a cement floor in a non environmentally controlled space is about as bad as it gets short of just putting it outside. Yes you can keep it in the garage but you cannot be lax in your storage protocols. Dehumidifiers are a must. Any prints left on metal surfaces will do it's evil work quicker under marginal storage conditions. Get the safe off the floor, put it on a piece of scrap plywood if nothing else. Address the humidity, either chemical absorbent or electronically. Never put a gun that has been handled back without a good wipe down. Set a schedule for inspection and routine cleaning.
One of the biggest positive steps would be to move the safe to the most environmentally stable location possible. A closet in the master bedroom is ideal. It is a area of the home that typically has a pretty stable temperature. Keep in mind the bathroom and the humidity it might add. Moving the safe to a better location will not preclude reasonable storage discipline but it will certainly make any lapses far less likely to cause harm quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Location is a huge factor. On a cement floor in a non environmentally controlled space is about as bad as it gets short of just putting it outside. Yes you can keep it in the garage but you cannot be lax in your storage protocols. Dehumidifiers are a must. Any prints left on metal surfaces will do it's evil work quicker under marginal storage conditions. Get the safe off the floor, put it on a piece of scrap plywood if nothing else. Address the humidity, either chemical absorbent or electronically. Never put a gun that has been handled back without a good wipe down. Set a schedule for inspection and routine cleaning.
One of the biggest positive steps would be to move the safe to the most environmentally stable location possible. A closet in the master bedroom is ideal. It is a area of the home that typically has a pretty stable temperature. Keep in mind the bathroom and the humidity it might add. Moving the safe to a better location will not preclude reasonable storage discipline but it will certainly make any lapses far less likely to cause harm quickly.
Yes I know the location is not ideal, but I do use a dehumidifier, always have. But don't understand about my rubber recoil pads sticking to the bottom of the safe. I will try to get it off the concrete floor but don't know why that would make much difference in regards to the stocks sticking.
 
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