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Discussion Starter #21
Can you still find "Stikeanywhere" matches?
I haven’t even attempted to look for them. I guess they are still around but can be a pain to source. I’m going to be using a product called Prime-All which is made for repriming .22LR cases but can also be used for regular primers as well as homemade percussion caps for black powder guns.
 

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There's plenty out there. It all depends on how much you're willing to spend.
Yeah... there are plenty of primers out there too o_O

And I was looking for a Kentucky or Virginia Flintlock in about a .32 or .35 caliber. Traditions, Pendersoli or Lyman. And everything is sold out or backordered. Did find one site that I could custom build a Virginian Flintlock ~$2500.
 

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Yeah... there are plenty of primers out there too o_O

And I was looking for a Kentucky or Virginia Flintlock in about a .32 or .35 caliber. Traditions, Pendersoli or Lyman. And everything is sold out or backordered. Did find one site that I could custom build a Virginian Flintlock ~$2500.
Ah, ok...I see. I've not looked at any of those in decades. Mine are a bit more....historically accurate.
 

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Years ago someone brought this up on another forum. I decided it would be good to know if a shtf happens. I did about a dozen loads, half with match heads, and half with a roll of toy gun caps. .38spcl with an indoor short range load of smokeless, tried one each with BP. they all fired. Anvils were fairly easy to get out. Right size pin punch and block to take the FP dent out, and then the anvils were a press fit. The caps were a pita to size into the primer cup, but doable.
 

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One of the things I know about primer compound is that it has to be a wet slurry when handled. When dry it is pressure or more accurately impact sensitive and it doesn’t take very much of an impact to ignite it. It is an explosive unlike gunpowder. It was mentioned about the 22LR reloading kits, but the hazmat fee I imagine would make ones head spin.

If one could find a way to disassemble a spent primer without damaging the cup and anvil, swage the dent from the firing pin, and swaging the primer cup to reduce its I.D. to hold the anvil, it could be reassembled again. The disc of paper that is in between the primer compound and anvil is easy enough to make. It is the application of the primer compound into the primer cup is the real challenge with being able to accurately meter it for any hope for consistency. The reassembly I would believe would done with an arbor press and a die to hold the primer cup and a punch to insert the anvil. I sure there is some form of curing of the primer compound. This doable, but very time consuming. If the world got hit by an asteroid to me it mite be worth the effort.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
One of the things I know about primer compound is that it has to be a wet slurry when handled. When dry it is pressure or more accurately impact sensitive and it doesn’t take very much of an impact to ignite it. It is an explosive unlike gunpowder. It was mentioned about the 22LR reloading kits, but the hazmat fee I imagine would make ones head spin.

If one could find a way to disassemble a spent primer without damaging the cup and anvil, swage the dent from the firing pin, and swaging the primer cup to reduce its I.D. to hold the anvil, it could be reassembled again. The disc of paper that is in between the primer compound and anvil is easy enough to make. It is the application of the primer compound into the primer cup is the real challenge with being able to accurately meter it for any hope for consistency. The reassembly I would believe would done with an arbor press and a die to hold the primer cup and a punch to insert the anvil. I sure there is some form of curing of the primer compound. This doable, but very time consuming. If the world got hit by an asteroid to me it mite be worth the effort.
Actually, the Prime-All compound doesn’t have hazmat fees because it is shipped as several inert ingredients which are mixed together like black powder. As long as everything is separate, no boom. After everything is mixed is when you have to be careful. I need to get some acetone as well.

You do bring up a good point about metering the compound into the primers though. There may be some trial and error here.
 
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WillieB,
OK for the hazmat fee.
I sure you know about acetones volatility, combustion and evaporation. The evaporation rate is really fast. I have used acetone in previous employments and it flashes fast and will degrade most plastics, so you cant use plastic containers, and some plastics propensity for static charge,plus as it evaporates it will build pressure in a vessel so you cant use glass. I sure you can use a metal container, but to safe it mite need to be grounded, but hopefully the primer compound will come with safety instructions.

As for metering out the primer compound, look into pharmaceutical laboratory equipment. There mite be a type of a programable syringe to dispense the primer compound slurry.

You got me thinking about this with recharging primers. A good friend of mine has a set of Corbin bullet forming dies that reform spent 22LR cases into .224” bullets for centerfire use, that I have been wanting to try.

Please keep us posted on any progress if you decide to try this.
 

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You do bring up a good point about metering the compound into the primers though. There may be some trial and error here.
As for metering out the primer compound, look into pharmaceutical laboratory equipment. There mite be a type of a programable syringe to dispense the primer compound slurry.
For repetitive consistent transfer of small quantities, I have used lab pipettes like these, available from many laboratory supply places or on ebay. You could get eyedroppers, but it would be hard to control delivering consistent quantities.
1606044693670.png
You can get them fixed volumes, or adjustable volumes. They use disposable plastic tips that you can get in bags of 500. The adjustable volume would be an advantage for moving from SPP to LRP, for example. I've used them many years with liquids; not sure how they would work with a slurry. Depends on how viscous the slurry is. Maybe cut the tip off the plastic pipette tip so it has a larger opening.
1606045103641.png

The pipette should come with calibration certificate.
When the time comes or if you think it needs to be checked, checking calibration should be easy. Tare a tip on your scales, pipette water into it, then reweigh the tip. Water is 1 gram/cubic centimeter at standard temperature and pressure.
 
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Discussion Starter #32
@BlackEagle I looked at some pipettes online. I will likely go with a fixed volume rather than adjustable because the fixed pipettes are more in my budget. I just need to figure out what the volume of primer slurry I need first.
 

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I just need to figure out what the volume of primer slurry I need first.
That will be the trick. I was also thinking you would need several fixed volume pipettes for different volumes for large pistol, large rifle, small pistol, small rifle primers. Although the variable pipettes are more expensive, I don't think one of them would cost what two fixed volume pipettes would cost, if you go for different sizes of primer.

Perhaps there is some information on slurry volume on the website that makes the kits.
 

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Discussion Starter #34
That will be the trick. I was also thinking you would need several fixed volume pipettes for different volumes for large pistol, large rifle, small pistol, small rifle primers. Although the variable pipettes are more expensive, I don't think one of them would cost what two fixed volume pipettes would cost, if you go for different sizes of primer.

Perhaps there is some information on slurry volume on the website that makes the kits.
Well, SSP is all I’ve ever dealt with since I only reload for my handguns. Although I may consider doing this with some 209 primers for the muzzleloader in the future.

As far as information from the website, there is very little info about it anywhere. The site is basically a Shopify store to sell their stuff and they have been silent on FB since sometime in 2018. There is nothing but posts from customers complaining about the slow shipping times and non responsive customer service. I may just source some cap gun caps and go that route.
 
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I'm not sure I'd fool with the cap gun caps unless there is some hotter ones than I found. They barely worked with black powder and it's a lot easier to ignite than smokeless.
 
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Discussion Starter #36
I'm not sure I'd fool with the cap gun caps unless there is some hotter ones than I found. They barely worked with black powder and it's a lot easier to ignite than smokeless.
From what little bit I’ve gathered from internet research, the Super Bang caps made in Germany work better and are hotter than the Chinese made caps. Also one mentioned putting just a tiny pinch of gunpowder between two caps.

This is all gonna be highly experimental.
 
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